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Non GIA Color Grading


#1

Hi Folks, Have several questions: I’ve seen references to a AAA,
AA, A system of colored stone grading. How does it compare to
the GIA systems? Where did it originate? How widespread is its
use?

Thanks for the opportunity to learn more!
Carol


| Carol J. Bova @Carol_J_Bova |
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’’


#2

In my grandfathers time, the salesman who put the most A’s in
front of the diamond supposedly had the best stone !! The GIA
decided to start with “D”, in order to distance their grading
system form the others. The AGS also has a grading system, as do
many independants. The truth of the matter is that whenever an
expensive stone is sold, GIA grading & certification is the way
to go!!!

Rob Ringold
RIngold’s Jewelers Since 1908


#3
       Hi Folks, Have several questions: I've seen references
to a AAA, AA, A system of colored stone grading. How does it
compare to the GIA systems?  Where did it originate? How
widespread is its use? 

Hi Carol:

The “AAA” etc “system” isn’t really a system at all. It is
based on nothing more than subjective opinion. Thus, it is only
as reliable as the individual dealer using it. At best, an
"AAA" grade means “this is really nice stuff – the best I
have”. At worst, it means “this isn’t as horrible as the other
junk I’m selling.”

Of course, the GIA systems are completely incomprehensible to
the average consumer, so where does that leave us? IMHO, the
best we can do is to describe the gems we sell as accurately as
possible, and let the customer know that she can have her money
back if she doesn’t like them.

Tom


#4

I would love to learn more about that grading also (since those
are usually the stones I use . . .) Thanks!


#5

Tom said,

 Of course, the GIA systems are completely incomprehensible to
the average consumer, so where does that leave us?  IMHO, the
best we can do is to describe the gems we sell as accurately
as possible, and let the customer know that she can have her
money back if she doesn't like them.<<

Couldn’t agree more!

However, it shouldn’t be incomprehensible to anyone buy/selling
colored stones. It’s a very good system to get close to what you
want when orderi ng without seeing the stone. It’s also a good
system to use for defining the color on an appraisal form. Not
being able to do a good job defining color within the industry
makes me tend to question someones expertise.

My $.02 worth.

Dave


#6

Greetings Orchids,

It occurs to me that this thread brings up a really important
aspect of our art/craft i.e. being a business, whether we want it
to be or not!

GIA does an awesome job in TRYING to bring some reliability and
repeatability to products that are by their very nature
UNIQUE…The is only as good as the communication
between the student and teacher and the seller and buyer.

I have been to and in the mines in Asia,bought rough and
finished stones, EVERYBODY has THE BEST THERE IS AT THE BEST
PRICE!

If you don’t know what you are looking at or for well you will
find out when you return and try to sell your product. A
gamble!!!

This is why our commercial gem merchant friends on the list are
so good at posting what they will have shortly!!! Creating that
demand is an art!!!

This is one reason why in diamonds at least, DeBeers is a
cartel, to control the illusion of scarcity in diamonds and
artifically prop up their value. Like any pyramid of sales it is
great if you are at the top! But there are many levels to make a
living at as well.

“Diamonds are a girls best friend” what an awesome bit of
promotion!!!

How many times does a customer in a time of need or distress,
want to sell diamond or colored gem jewelry only to find that it
is valued just slightly above or below the cost of the metal?

We are in the trade of selling illusions; beautiful, exotic,
unique, unusual, cool, far out, sensuous, erotic, desireable
illusions…

Most customers are INTIMIDATED by microscopes! They don’t have a
clue what they are looking at or for!

It is for the illusion of reassurance more that scientific
rigidity, that these instruments are so proudly displayed. It
even says so in the trade literature!

I love all the different sources and opinions expressed here on
Orchid, I especially appreciate the stone dealers who offer their
goods for our inspection and purchase! And the artists willing to
share their awesome creative spirits and boundless experience and
knowledge!

I would like to suggest that we share more about how to create
the ILLUSIONS that SELL and still remain honest & successful
merchants!!!

BRAVO TO ORCHID!

Wm.

             Mystical Grits
         Wm. Augustus Mason
url: http://www.concentric.net/~lightone/               

Metaphysical Art Jewelry, Lapidary, Energy Tools
Crystals & Gems, Food Design & Creation
Original Spiritual Space Jazz Heart Music
Furniture Design
Ideas, Fantasies, Visions, Conscious Creations
Feel Good, Be Happy, Enjoy LIFE!
Easley, South Carolina USA


#7

Dear William Augustus Mason, AKA: Mystical Grits, Just for fun,
(if you already haven’t), you should read, “The Last Empire, De
Beers, Diamond, and the World”; by Stefan Kanfer, The Noonday
Press. Oh…Make sure you’re sitting down. Lisa Bialac-Jehle
Topanga, CA


#8
  Most customers are INTIMIDATED by microscopes! They don't
have a clue what they are looking at or for! 

I’m going to assume that some of us don’t have a clue as to what
we are looking at /for either! : )


#9

Dave, since I’ve started buying stones I’ve noticed quite a
difference in Color. I’ve come to the conclusion that when
you’re willing to pay a few extra bucks the colors are much more
vivid than when you’re looking for the “bargain” prices. I’m
assuming that “deeper color = better quality” but , I could be
totally mistaken.

One other thing to mention, I’ve noticed that artificial
lighting enhances the color of stone, I’m not sure how that can
be avoided.


#10
 I'm going to assume that some of us don't have a clue as to
what we are looking at /for either!  : ) 

Fishbre, it’s a good idea to know what you are looking at for
your own sake. But if you are working with customers’ stones, I
strongly encourage you to take some basic gemology classes.

Karen