Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Niello filled engravings


#1

Hello, I am an engraver who wishes to make some niello filled
engravings. I have been unable to find any commercially available
supply of the material used for niello. Do you know of a pre
manufactured source for the material? This would be a powered (or in
stick form)material of metal sulfides, much like enamels, that is
then fired into the engraving and filed and polished flush like
Champleve’. If you do, I would like to purchase some for my own use.

Thank you, Keith Cranmer


#2

from a search of the Orchid archives for “Niello supplier”

Karl Fischer GmbH at http://www.fischer-pforzheim.de/ lists Niello in
their catalogue.

Allan Heywood


#3

Keith, The only place I have heard of it commercially available is
from Fischer in Pforzheim Germany. You can order from them online at
http://www.fischer-pforzheim.de part number 7625. It is finely
powdered. I’ve never used theirs, I make my own.

Larry


#4

The only folk who I know who have done niello work recently have
made up their own using one of the ‘traditional’ recipes available
(A.K. are you out there somewhere?).

Also I just wonder how niello inlays might affect hallmarking
requirements - is it classed as ‘metallic’ (it is a mixed
silver/lead sulphide) and if so would its presence prevent a piece
being hallmarked?

Jack Ogden


#5
    Also I just wonder how niello inlays might affect hallmarking
requirements - is it classed as 'metallic' (it is a mixed
silver/lead sulphide) and if so would its presence prevent a piece
being hallmarked? 

The best way would be to get the piece hallmarked before inlaying
the niello - just as you would if you were going to enamel it…

    Freshly ground silica particles are a very serious health
hazard when respired, but "aged" particles that have been lying
around in sediments or soil dust are not.   There are several
scientific theories about why freshly ground silica should be so
dangerous whereas "aged" silica particles that have been lying
around in sediments or on the surface of the ground are not. 

A very plausible reason and one which certainly works for asbestos
which I used to have to know a lot about - is that freshly ground or
crushed particles have sharp edges which then subsequently get worn
down smooth. These sharp particles can work their way into the flesh
of the lungs and cause irritation. The small particle size is the
worst because it can get into the smallest corners of the lungs (the
alveoli) which, unlike the mucus lined larger vessels, have no
self-protection mechanism. Best wishes, Ian

Ian W. Wright
Sheffield, UK


#6
    The only folk who I know who have done niello work recently
have made up their own using one of the 'traditional' recipes
available (A.K. are you out there somewhere?). Also I just wonder
how niello inlays might affect hallmarking requirements - is it
classed as 'metallic' (it is a mixed silver/lead sulphide) and if
so would its presence prevent a piece being hallmarked? 

Jack Finally - I lurk no longer - there is something I can say
authoritatively!

I recently had a piece returned from the London Assay Office because
of the (home made) niello inlay. They were very friendly about it and
it was returned unmarked and not defaced, but the copper/lead content
was the reason. Black enamel would have been ok!

John
www.john2hud.co.uk