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Nest - Holding Place


#1

Materials: Sterling silver, antique ivory dice
Dimensions: 8" x 5" x 5"

sterling silver wire and die-formed base.

Photo credit: Robly A. Glover

Nancy A Slagle
Lubbock, Texas. USA

This work is concerned with function as a means of creating modern ritual. The vessel is my means of expression. The vessel is a container of space and a definition of form. Planes and curves, static and kinetic, hard and soft, yin and yang, all these questions of balance are evident in the resolution of form. Through the manipulation of these elements movement, energy, and vitality have become apparent.

I have kept the scale conservative to promote an intimacy of relationship with the object. The approachability of the object supports the functional aspects of the work, making the use understandable and desirable. The scale and texture welcomes close inspection, which invites the viewer to pick it up and consider its use.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#2

Materials: Silver, steel ,cidar wood.
Dimensions: H 22cm x 14 cm

An old silverware was cut in pieces and then the pieces were formed into a new object.The bowl is supported by steel rods and the base is made of coloured cidar wood.

Photo credit: The artist

Akis Goumas
Athens-N.Ionia, Greece

I am metal artist from Greece and also a researcher in ancient metalsmithing and jewellery techniques of the Aegean region.
I am inspired from natures forms and structures.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#3

Materials: Silver, Red Macaw feathers, egg sulfur oxidation
Dimensions: 4.8 cm length x 4.3 cm width x 18.5 cm high

Macaws (Ara macao, Ara ararauna) are considered in Europe and USA as exotic birds by the beautiful colors of its plumage, so are subject to an intense manhunt for illegal trade, most of the specimens that are kept as pets are wildlife trafficking proceeds. Tropical forests that are their natural habitat are becoming more scarce. Macaws are endangered and this box is for me a reminder of this reality, it represents a strong desire to keep them safe.

Photo credit: Ana Catalina Lizano

Ana Catalina Lizano
San Francisco de Dos Rios,
Costa Rica

Jewelry is an intimate space that allows me to be alone with myself, I enjoy it and need it. My subjects are scenes, stories or events represented in a descriptive and literal way, sometimes ludic, sometimes graphic but always concrete. Anything can be an inspiration: a personal experience, a picture, television news, a poem, a character, a landscape, a material just found. The color of tropical Latin America is everywhere, for me it is very difficult to scape this reality and I manifest it using stones, patinas, paint, textiles, paper or any other alternative material that contrasts with the neutrality of the noble metals. I’m also interested in re-used objects. My quest is not complex, my pieces are what they are, plain and bare, words, feelings, memories and stories to be worn.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.