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Neat new addition to the bench


#1

Hi All;

Don’t know why I didn’t get this before, but I’ve found it really
handy to have a can of compressed air at the bench, you know, the
kind camera stores and such sell. It should come with a little
plastic tube to create a fine point of air. I use it to blow wax dust
off waxes while I’m carving, to blow metal chips out of stone seats,
and to cool down articles I don’t want to quench. Try it!

David L. Huffman


#2
Don't know why I didn't get this before, but I've found it really
handy to have a can of compressed air at the bench, you know, the
kind camera stores and such sell... 

A goldsmith friend brought me a couple of cans last year and I’ve
been use them for the same things you do David. I particularly like
to use them to dry off pieces with thermal shock sensitive stones
after rhodium plating rather than steaming to remove any water
spots. I just back off the can a little bit for that because the air
comes out pretty cold. It’s handy to have in the shop for sure!

A new addition to my bench that I love is Kate Wolf’s EcoFlex LED
bench light. I use it primarily when I’m using my scope on my
micro-ball. I have a ring light on the scope and bring my 3 tube
bench light down as well, but the LED light can be positioned right
where I want it and gives a bright, adjustable light right where I
need it.

Mark


#3

I have been using them for years. As a mechanic I used to rely on
compressed air from a big compressor. I buy them by the three pack at
the big discount stores. The pressure is not so great that it blows
everything around, but strong enough to blow dirt and dust off of
items when I have a mask on and want to blow with my mouth and find
it hard blowing through the mask.

Ken Moore
970-493-6971
www.kenworx.com


#4

I use an air compressor to power my GraverMax and have a air nozzle
nearby to blow off debris. I use the canned air upside down to
quickly set up Thermo-Loc.


#5

Hi David,

Yes, the can of air is a good tool, but really it’s a bit too
overkill. Also, once you run out of the compressed air, you have to
replace the whole thing (and recycle???) Here are sites for a much
simpler tool, Bulb Dusters, to use for the same tasks, less
expensive and just as effective:



I’m guessing there are many other sites where these can be purchased
(camera shops, computer suppliers, etc.).

Hope you find this useful info,
Linda Kaye-Moses


#6

Hi all,

I don’t normally get on a high horse about such things but I would
have to say that it is very irresponsible to suggest using canned
air or canned dusters. Most of these products are difluoroethane,
trifluoroethane, or tetrafluoroethane. Not only can these be
flammable under certain conditions they are green house gases that
should not be released into the atmosphere. Beyond the environmental
problems, these gases often contain bitterants that can irritate the
skin…not the best thing to leave on a piece of jewelry.

I would suggest getting an old blow pipe to concentrate your own
breath, or alternatively an aquarium air pump. Connecting a hose to
the exhaust port of your wet dry vacuum with a concentrator tip
produces a nice blast. Home Depot sells a $25 wet dry vac head that
fits on a 5 gallon bucket. These are super useful as one can have a
different bucket for different applications. Other options include a
compressor, bellows or a hand pump. Personally I use a brush 90% of
the time.

Ok, I hope to not step on any toes. But in this case, just because
one can readily buy these cans, doesn’t mean that they are in any
way a consumable that any of us should be using.

Scott Garrison
Oakland, California


#7
I don't normally get on a high horse about such things but I would
have to say that it is very irresponsible to suggest using canned
air or canned dusters. Most of these products are difluoroethane,
trifluoroethane, or tetrafluoroethane. Not only can these be
flammable under certain conditions they are green house gases that
should not be released into the atmosphere. Beyond the
environmental problems, these gases often contain bitterants that
can irritate the skin...not the best thing to leave on a piece of
jewelry. 

Scott, thank you for the I probably would not have used
this trick, but I was not aware of all the consequences of using
canned air, so thank you. That is what this board is for, to pass
along knowledge, it does not help to just say “work smart” if you
don’t know what that entails.

Roxy


#8

I use a Paasche type H airbrush connected to an extra port I
installed on my airgraver manifold. Better and cheaper than canned
air. Steve Lindsay at airgraver.com has the quick release
connectors, they’re the same ones he uses to connect his airgraver to
the manifold or you can find suitable hardware at most art supply
stores or paint houses that carry airbrushes.

Dave Phelps


#9

trichlorofluroethane has to be gotten by prescription from an MD and
is used as a freeze spray for sprains, sports injuries when they
happen and other related uses…The govt. has begun to regulate sales
of “canned air” to some degree, but those less toxic, and harmful
types are clearly touting their superiority on the labels- the
telling sign of a “bad” brand is the residue it leaves if sprayed
too close to a surface, and the warning on the packaging about
avoiding contact with skin and/or ‘frostbite’… Nonetheless, canned
air is flammable particularly if you have one of those " always on"
pilot torch lighting things on your bench, and is an expensive way to
go. A good, or even decent air compressor has many uses in the
studio, and can be less noisy than a wet-dry vac if you are using it
to collect dust, solder fumes, grinding bits etc…and is on for
extended periods of time…Then there are tanks that store compressed
air without any greenhouse gasses. The downside of these is they have
to be refilled more or less frequently depending on their capacity
and how much or what one uses them for…so if you want canned air at
the bench this seems to me, the safest option… then there’s the
question of unnecessary electrical usage…I am all for the brush. In
fact a teacher i had many years ago passed out unused mascara brushes
that were wrong for the company that had intended to use them in
their wand manufacture and were sold by the thousands for a buck as
surplus…I still have 10 or so, the other 5 lasted over 30 years…
great simple solution to removing bits and powder from the bench
pin, handpieces, etc… I save my canned air for stopping my dog’s
barking when it has gone too far ! Since I made my own hydro power
for more than 25 years and have solar power I can rationalise the
occasional spurt of convenient behaviour modification ( or lampshade
dusting- which, trust me, only happens once or twice a year) !
Everything is a trade-off no?..rer


#10
Nonetheless, cannedair is flammable 

Me? To paraphrase LaurenBacall - I just put my lips together and
blow… Too many gadgets already…


#11
Nonetheless, canned air is flammable 

Not all “canned air” is flammable. Read the label.

There are products which do contain nothing but compressed air. They
are refillable with a hand pump or compressor. Seems to me that a
small shop compressor with a small storage tank under the bench would
work nicely.

Al Balmer
Pine City, NY


#12
trichlorofluroethane has to be gotten by prescription from an MD
and is used as a freeze spray for sprains, sports injuries when
they happen and other related uses.. 

Trichlorofluroethane is a refrigerant. I have a license issued by the
EPA to buy, sell and transport refrigerants so I don’t need a
prescription. But my compressor is one of those enormous things they
sell at Home Depot and it lives in it’s own little semi-air
conditioned room outside my workshop and it’s always on. It’s
powered indirectly by coal. Thanx TVA for making my air so dirty & my
bills so high!