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Motorized jeweler's saws & cutting damascus


#1
I am looking for anyone who has had experience with a motorized
saw that uses standard jeweler's sawblades, or a similar saw
capable of cutting heavy stock.

Bob, Try Lee Marshall at Bonny Doon Engineering. I know he was
working on one. He has a great web page also (about hydraulic die
forming). http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com/ Sorry don’t know
how to make that a link. He’s in Santa Cruz, CA. and is a
wonderful man. Hope this helps!

Good Luck, Jerry Scavezze


#2

Hi Robert,

I have a lapidary diamond band saw and that’s what I would try.
I think anything running a jeweler’s saw would take positively
forever to get through a billet of steel!

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#3

Jerry, I have an RBI scroll saw that is great for pierced work,
however, if I haven’t used it for while, and I often don’t, I
have to relearn, and practice, as I easily lose the touch. Once
I do, it’s a great worksaver and arm saver.

Ruth


#4
Jerry, I have an RBI scroll saw that is great for pierced work,
however, if I haven't used it for while, and I often don't, I
have to relearn, and practice, as I easily lose the touch.  Once
I do, it's a great worksaver and arm saver.

Ruth - I bought a craftsman scroll saw at a pawn shop some time
ago thinking maybe I could use it. I’ve only tried once on
metal, but it clattered so much I quit trying. Is this part of
the “touch” you meant? Do I just keep on practicing? Thanks.

Merry Holidays!

Nancy
Bacliff, TX USA
@nbwidmer


#5

Nancy, Regarding the scroll saw, the clatter you mentioned may
just be from using too heavy a blase for the thickness of the
metal you were cutting, and then not holding the metal down
securely. Any of the scroll sawing magazines, books give the
number of teeth recommended for the job at hand. The “touch” I
was referring to is actually getting the blade at the right
tension, to avoid breaking it. Once that’s done, it is a dream
to work with; of course, success might also have something to do
with the quality of the machine you are using. I used it once
to do a “papercut,” on 20 gauge sterling, 6" x 18", and then
formed it into a crown. I believe I had to drill well over 200
holes for the pierced work, but the cutting was so precise and
fine, that I had no filing to do afterwards. I also recall that
I glued it to a piece of wood, perhaps 1/8" thick before cutting.
I used Elmer’s Gllue. Isoaked dthe wood off, dissolving the glue
in water. In order to polish it, I fastened it again to a
thicker board, and held it up to various buffs on my machine.
The wood backing kept it from catching it on the wheels, and
tearing my fingers off. I still have the wood pieces, they have
the outlines of the design in tripoli! If you are cutting very
thin metal, you can actually make a sandwich between 2 pieces of
wood, drawing the design easily on the wood. You can sandwich
many pieces of metal together, just adjust which blade you use
accordingly. I think that there is no harm using a finer blade
than is recommended, even though it will be slower, it will
produce a fine edge.

Hope this helps,
Ruth


#6

I bought a craftsman scroll saw at a pawn shop some time
ago thinking maybe I could use it. I’ve only tried once on
metal, but it clattered so much I quit trying. Is this part of
the “touch” you meant? Do I just keep on practicing?

I have a Craftsman scroll saw, too, and use it for metal. The
clattering might be that you didn’t have the tension on the saw
blade tight enough. Try adjusting the knob set back on top of the
arm. Hope this helps.

Jill
@jandr
http://members.tripod.com/~jilk


#7
Nancy, Regarding the scroll saw, the clatter you mentioned may
just be from using too heavy a blase for the thickness of the
metal you were cutting, and then not holding the metal down
securely.  . . . . . . 

What kind of blades do you use? Regular jewelers blades, and if
so how do you attach them – or – regular scroll saw blades?
I only found two different blades at Sears.

What’s a “papercut” (besides that thing on the finger that
hurts)???

Thanks Ruth. I’m as excited about trying to do this again as I
was when I first brought it home from the pawn shop. January is
beginning to look almost as busy as October, November and
December with all the great things I’ve learned here.

Merry Holidays!

Nancy
Bacliff, TX USA
@nbwidmer


#8

What kind of blades do you use? Regular jewelers blades, and if
so how do you attach them – or – regular scroll saw blades?

I use the regular jeweler’s blade and attach it with the thumb
screws and clamps, like on a regular saw frame. Not all of the
Craftsman scroll saws have this feature. Some are only equipped
to take the scroll saw blades with the pins on them.

Jill
@jandr
http://members.tripod.com/~jilk


#9

Hi Gang,

A couple of ideas for you folks wanting a saw to do 'piercing’
with. Use a blade that has fine enough teeth that there are
always 2 teeth in contact with the metal. This will make the saw
work much smoother & reduc e vibration to almost nil. Lub the
blade with some type of oil (eg. oil of wintergreen, 3 in
1,etc). If possible rig up a small piece of felt to rub against
the blade. Soak t he felt with the oil. Attach the metal to
backing if doing small pieces, (double stick scotch tape or
glue). If cutting alot of the same pattern, make a stack of metal
sheets, glue o r scotch tape them together.

FWIW

There’s a scroll saw (Cuti Pi) made by Taylor Mfg, PO Box 1826,
Rialto CA 92377-1826, Fax 909-820-4860, E-mail
taylormfg@juno.com. I’ve seen it demo’d at Tucson & it does a
very good job. The saw can be used for metal or stone with the
installation of the correct blade. I’f I remember, it’s about
$300.00. They run an ad (2x2") in Rock & Gem. Usual disclaimer,
not connected with the co, don’t own the saw, just saw it demo’d.

HTH

Dave


#10

Nancy, A “papercut” is a folk art form, seen in Jewish art
work, that I know of," that involves cutting a continuous design
from white paper. An Exacto knife and sometimes a fine manicure
scissors are used. The paper left is the design, rather than what
you cut out, somewhat like a doily. I have seen papercuts, with
entire verses in Hebrew, names, dates, and either symmetric or
asymmetric designs covering over 36"x48", all cut from one
piece. Soemtimes they are layered over colored papers, and
embellished with calligraphy, illuminations, etc. In Jewish art,
these are used as wall decorations, and are commonly seen in
wedding contracts, call “Ketubahs.”

I tried a much simpler version of this, using the silver sheet
to substitute for the paper. Of course I use a fine jeweler’s
saw instead of the Exacto knife. If you’d like to see examples
of papercuts, go to a friend’s site, www.dbandart.com

Ruth

Thanks everyone for your suggestions on how to set the stone in
the pearl. One other question? Which bur should I used to grind
a seat in a tube setting? Ruth