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Most popular women's ring size


#1

Howdy Jewelers!

I’m seeking insight into what you have experienced as your most
popular women’s ring size.

I am going to make several 18k stackable rings for a show in April.
I do not want to resize these specific rings later, so I would like
to make them in a size that is likely to fit the majority of women
who try them on. They will be fairly narrow bands, approximately 2 -
2.5mm wide. Any advice will be much appreciated!

Thanks,
Alexis
Alexis Romeo Jewelry
www.alexisromeo.com


#2

My boothmate and I don’t make a lot of rings, but we have noticed one
thing. We tend to sell the sizes that are not easily available,
elsewhere. I you work in the normal sizes 6-8, there is a lot more
competion for those sales. They can buy rings, almost anywhere. If
you work in the larger sizes or even slightly smaller sizes, those
folks will be more likely to buy, because they can’t find any rings
that fit. I wear a 9 on my ring finger and my boothmates
stepdaughter, at 17 wore a size 9 and a half. She isn’t especially
tall nor fat. You will find a lot of ladies that might try them on,
but will they buy. I love to find the niche markets.

Cairenn, the Howling Artist
www.howlingartist.com


#3

I’d say size 6 to 7 1/2. I don’t like re-sizing rings either once
I’ve made them. I’ll offer to custom make one to size first.

Kenton


#4

Alexis - depending on who you talk to, ladies stock size is 6 (US),
but 5 1/2 to 6 1/2 is the range you’ll find. Gents is 9 or 10
dpending on who you talk to even more. Always easier to stretch them
up a bit than to cut them down.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#5

Hi, I am speaking as a larger sized finger person who loves rings, I
can’t tell you the amount of times I would have bought a ring if it
just slipped on my finger.

People with slim fingers have endless rings to choose from, and if
you are smart enough to make larger size rings and advertise it on
your booth or wherever you market your pieces I can almost guarantee
that you will always sell the larger sized rings. And remember bigger
ladies don’t always like big garish rings.

I went searching Tucson one year for a ring for a friend of mine who
has the same sized finger as me and as soon as I happened to stumble
upon a booth holder who had one to fit I bought it, didn’t even
bargain the price.

Plus you can always market the larger sized ones for the middle
finger which is very fashionable for the larger stones to be set
into. I see a lot of people wearing one large ring like this and a
big chunky cuff.

The same goes for necklaces or those cords some are just that little
bit too small and if you have a few at least in the larger sizes I
think you will sell them as quick if not quicker than the small ones.
Ditto for those cuff bracelets that are all the rage, go and look and
see if anyone is making larger ones you will have to search around
for them.

So please consider the larger framed people out there, they are
usually better customers to boot. They are so happy that something
fits right off the rack, I think there is more money to be made out
there if you have some of your range in the larger sizes.

Very few watches are made with that extra inch or so on the band
either unless you go into the men’s sections of watches.

Any one have any feedback on this? It would be interesting to hear
your experiences on this size issue.

I know it works in the clothing industry, I worked in retail and if
we had larger sized clothing these customers would always buy more
than one of items that fit, same goes for ladies larger sized shoes.
You will find the shop owner will only get a couple of sized 10 and
10.5 in a whole box of shoes and they are the first to go.

Sorry to ramble on but I think this is a subject that is not
broached often

Christine in the Ridge.


#6

I make most of my rings size 5 to 9 for women. . I am a ring person
and love to have a good selection.

I don’t make a lot of the same. I guess you could say my selection is
wide but not deep, in that I have many varieties but not a complete
size run in a particular style. They are one-of-a-sort-of-a- kind
rings.

Susan
www.ThorntonStudioJewelry.com


#7

I have noticed this, too. There is also the market for the lady that
wears a smaller than normal size. One of my friends, was trying to
use up the ends of some strands of beads and she made up some small
bracelets, maybe 5 and half or 6 inches. She thought that someone
might buy one for a child. She was doing a show, a lady with a small
wrist, discovered them and bought all of them. I really wish that
more folks and companies thought about those of us whao aren’t a
standard size. Have you ever seen a size 5 and half very wide shoe?
The extra wide widths, often start at around #8. When I find shoes
that fit and they are suitable for my use, I buy them, even though,
in general I wouldn’t pay that much for an item.

Cairenn, the Howling Artist
www.howlingartist.com


#8
Any one have any feedback on this? It would be interesting to hear
your experiences on this size issue. 

I like to make larger rings because I like to try them on, and I
wear a 9 or 10. I also occasionally make tiny rings, because fingers
come in all sizes.

I always offer to make rings to size, and sometimes people take me
up on it, but of course everyone prefers to just have it fit.

I have not found that the larger rings necessarily “sell right
away”, but my styles are, as they say, “not for everyone”. I do get
a lot of expressions of gratitude that the rings are not just in
size 6 or 7, even from people who don’t buy them. At shows, my rings
are set up so people can play with them, which everybody seems to
like to do-- especially if they fit.

I recently got an order for a man’s ring in size 17, with a 37mm
square turquoise. I have seldom seen a more thrilled customer.

Noel