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Mitsuro formula


#1

I saw some jewelry over the weekend and it was created using the
Mitsuro technique. This is method of mixing wax, bees wax, with
resins (maybe pine) until the mixture becomes like taffy, then
pulling the wax and getting a texture on the surface called ‘hikime’.
I would like to try this process. Does anyone have the formulas or
recipe for this mixture? I found in Orchid that it is discussed in a
book " Practical wax modeling - advanced techniques " by Hitsuro
Tsuyuki and Yoko Ohba. ISBN 4-87790-004-7 but it appears to be out
of print.

Also any ideas on where to buy the different ingredients such as the
rosins would be appreciated.

Thanks
Love and God Bless
-randy
http://www.rocksmyth.com


#2

I got a copy of that book on ebay last year. You might also find it
at http://www.abebooks.com

–Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Jewelry
http://www.featheredgems.com


#3

Randy, I don’t know about the material you are talking about, but it
sounds very interesting and a lot like proto-plast. The plastic made
by aquaplast. I use it to make models for casting in much the same
manner as you described. You heat the plastic in hot water and it
becomes soft like taffy. You can then pull and shape it and it
hardens when it cools. It burns out very clean and I have had great
results casting it. Might be worth a look if you don’t find the
stuff you are looking for. If you findwhat you are looking for let us
know, sounds like it might be very interesting to play with.

Frank Goss


#4
 Also any ideas on where to buy the different ingredients such as
the rosins would be appreciated. 

I just puchased the book from
http://www.tsijeweltools.com/books/htmls/instruction11.html they
only had 4 copies and now they have 3! Good luck.


#5
Also any ideas on where to buy the different ingredients such as
the rosins would be appreciated.  

Randy, check the archives and look under Rosin. There was a
discussion about making the different waxes found in the book. Michael
Michael@MichaelKnottDesigns.com


#6
This is method of mixing wax, bees wax, with resins (maybe pine)
until the mixture becomes like taffy, then pulling the wax and
getting a texture on the surface called 'hikime'. 

I am not familiar with the ‘hikime’ technique in particular, but I
think I can help you with the wax mixture. I studied lost wax
casting in Nepal and this sounds similar to the wax mixture we were
using. It was beeswax mixed with the resin of the sal tree (a local
pine). There is no indoor heating, so they mix it depending on the
season to get different melting temperatures. So the hardest
mixture would be a 1:1 ratio of wax to resin and a softer mixture
would be 1 part resin to 4 parts wax. A small amount of vegetable
oil is added, about 1 to 11/2 parts oil to 12 parts of the wax/
resin mixture. This wax is heated gently over smouldering soft
charcoal to work it. It is almost like modeling clay when heated,
then becomes hard and durable when cold. I haven’t devised a way to
heat it here in the US, but then again my only outdoor area is my
fire escape. I am sure you can come up with a way.

The mixture must be heated carefully at a very low heat. I think a
double boiler for a few hours would be the best strategy. In Nepal,
the mixture is heated over an open fire for half a day. The time is
reduced if the resin is pulverized before heating. I got a nasty
burn the first time I tried making it here on my gas stove, so I
must emphasize caution while making this mixture.

When I left Nepal, I brought a large burlap sack of this resin with
me. I would be willing to part with some of it, if you would like
some. Contact me off-list if you would like some of the resin.

Have a look at www.artnatasha.net to see some of the sculptures I
made using this traditional lost-wax technique. Also, I am happy to
announce that my jewelry website was launched this week
www.natashajewelry.com

I hope I have been of help to you.

Natasha Wozniak
@Natasha_Wozniak


#7

I have made mitsuro following the instructions in the Tsuyuki book
Basic wax Modeling. Here is the formula which he gives. Using a
scale, weigh out equal amounts of beeswax and pine resin. then
weigh out paraffin to equal 5-7% of the total weight of the resin
and beeswax. This will take some arithmetic. Melt the beeswax and
the resin in a pan over very low heat.—warm very slowly. allow it
to “cook” slowly, on low for 30 mins. to 1 hr. Be patient and
don’t overheat or you will ruin it. when all melted stir in
the paraffin. check the mixture. If it sticks to your fingers add
more paraffin. Test for hardness in small bit or water. If it is
too hard, add more beeswax, if too soft add more resin. You are
looking for it to be stretchy. When it arrives at that point,
strain the mixture through several layers of gauze onto a sheet
of aluminum foil. You can cut it into smaller pieces to store.
Beeswax and paraffin are easy to obtain. I got my resin from a
music store as string instrument players use it on their bows.
However, this is quite expensive, and I understand that you can get
suitable resin more cheaply from a sports place as baseball players
and other sports use it. Also, I have been told, but have not
verified it, that you can use the pitch sold by Northwest Pitchworks
for repousse work. If you need any more just let me
know. Also, have you checked Amazon for the book? That is where I
got mine not too long ago… One last suggestion. I heated the wax
in a small can placed in a pan of water. If you do this, you will
be less likely to overheat the mixture. However, be careful not
to let the water get into the wax mixture. If you have an
inexpensive double boiler you can use it—but remember that it
will be hard to get all the residue out of the pan when you are
finished, so it may be unsuitable for cooking purposes. Hopes this
helps. Good luck. Alma


#8

Hi Randy, As I learned from the book you mentioned; (I haven’t made
it but the recipe is like that) Equal weights of yellow impression
wax (It is refined beeswax) pine resin, soft wax (paraffin wax)
should be 5 - 7% of the total weight of the other two waxes. It is
advised in the book to use more resin in summer less in winter.
Using very low heat (it is very important to use low heat, otherwise
it will be ruined) melt the impression wax and the pine resin in a
flat pan. After it is melted mix the soft wax slowly. If the mitsuro
sticks to your fingers you should add more soft wax. After it is
mixed let it cool. To test it pour a spoonful into a pan of water.
When it is melted completely test it, if it is too hard add more
impression wax, if it is too soft add pine resin. When you stretch a
piece of mitsuro if you see lines and little depressions in the wax
then you are succesful. Pour the mixture in a flat pan full of water
through several layer of gauze. When it is solidified cut it into
small pieces and save it to use to make beautiful jewellery models.
Kind regards from Ankara, Turkey Oya Borahan


#9
Also any ideas on where to buy the different ingredients such as
the rosins would be appreciated. 

Allcraft has pine resin imported from Japan. I got some a few months
ago, but haven’t had time to mix up a batch. Allcraft: 135 West 29th
Street, Suite 402, NY,NY 10001 (800)645-7124 HTH, Kate Wolf in
Portland, Maine- hosting quality workshops.
http://www.katewolfdesigns.com


#10

Anyone else looking for the book that contains the Mitsuro technique,
I found another dealer that has 5 or so copies of Practical Wax
Modeling Advance Techniques for Wax Modelers available. Part #BK201
$34.95 http://www.armstrongtool.com/Books.htm The other site has
sold out and is not sure when they will get more copies in.

Terri Collier
Terri’s Place
Dallas, TX
@Terri_Collier