Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Microscope source


#1

Orchid friends-- There has been discussion of binocular
microscopes. I know absolutely nothing about them, or what they
should cost, but I see in my newest American Science & Surplus
catalogue three binocular microscopes,two fancy ones for $595, and a
simpler one for $199. The item #'s are 89971, 90197, and 90313 (there
may be others). Anyone out there who doesn’t know this catalog should
definately check it out. Great fun, and some great deals, though,
as always, it pays to know what you’re doing. You can find them at
www.sciplus.com. Hope this is of use! --Noel


#2

Dear Orchidians

Noel Yovovich was so kind as to refer to a source for microscopes,
but may I as an old microscope salesman put in a word of warning
here.

What you as a metalsmith/jeweller probably will be needing is a
stereoscopic microscope, i.e. a microscope where the right and the
left light path are not the same, but slightly angled to one another.

This means that your right eye will not see exactly the same picture
as the left and this again gives you the feeling of the depth of
field in the microscopic picture, thus the name ‘stereoscopic’.

A ‘binocular’ microscope just means that you use both eyes to see
normally the same picture and therefore you will not be able to see
where you are in the horizontal plane - the depth.

However, a special binocular (or for that matter monocular
(one-eyed)) microscope might be of use to certain gemmologists, that
would be the polarization microscope. This allows you to measure some
optical properties of certain minerals, but again this is another
speciallity.

Before you invest heavily in a thing like this, please check what
your needs are.

I’ll finish just like our grand old John Burgess from NZ and say:
'Just trying to be helpful and not wanting to confuse the issue.
Cheers, –

Kind regards
Niels L�vschal, Jyllinge, Denmark
@L_F8vschal