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Micron gold plating on silver


#1

Hi

I want to do 2 micron yellow gold plating over a silver ring.
However the vendor tells me that the color of the yellow micron
plating is going to be like 22K gold (which is too yellow). I want a
color closer to the 14K gold (Hamilton). The vendor says that he
will do the flash plating on top of the micron plating to give the
14K color. Is this normal ? Cant we get a 14K color from a micron
plating bath ?

It sounds that after a while when the 14K flash gold plating color
wears off from the surface, all the dark yellow plating color of 22K
will reappear.

Please help
Best Regards,
Dinesh


#2

Dinesh- I hope this is for display only pieces.

No matter the karat or color, gold plating will wear off on a ring
in short order unless it’s only in recessed and protected areas. 2
microns is not a lot. Just google images for “how big is a micron”.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#3

May I expand this a little?

I want to plate very thin gold on ceramic plates. I have a saucer
here from China and a cup from Germany which are completely coated in
gold. It is striking. How is that done?


#4

Hi

call me a moron but I thought you could only plate in pure gold. I
am not an expert in electroplating so I could be wrong. Not the first
time LOL.

Now there will be platers on Orchid who really know, how to do this.
2 microns seems a little thin.

Interested to see what those who know more than me think.

all the best
Richard.


#5

Hi Jo,

I understand that the plating will wear off over a period of time. My
jewelry is for sale and not just for displays (commercial volume
orders). But my question is still can one get a color of 14K gold
from a micron plating bath ? Is it normal to plate 14K flash plating
color over the micron plating ?

Best Regards,
Dinesh


#6

Peter, if it is porcelain clay the gold is most likely fired on in a
kiln as the last part of the process. I used gold on my porcelain
sculpture in the 70’s. The gold comes in a brown liquid form and is
painted on with a sable brush. I believe it is fired at 900 degrees.
I used an 019 pyrometric cone to determine when to shut the kiln
down. Has been a long time since I used that material. Hopes this
helps.

Best,
Chris Hierholzer


#7
I want to plate very thin gold on ceramic plates. I have a saucer
here from China and a cup from Germany which are completely coated
in gold. It is striking. How is that done? 

These are not electroplated. These are glazed in the kiln with a
metallic overglaze.

Elliot Nesterman


#8

These are not electroplated. These are glazed in the kiln with a
metallic overglaze.

Thanks for the Do you know what the composition of the
glaze is other than gold or who supplies it? I do have a kiln and I
would like to try it out.


#9

I want to plate very thin gold on ceramic plates. I have a saucer
here from China and a cup from Germany which are completely coated
in gold. It is striking. How is that done?

It’s not done with an electro-plating process. Instead, you paint a
"luster," which is a liquid suspension of gold in an oil base, over
the already-fired glaze. When re-fired to a fairly low ceramic
temperature (cone 018, which translates to about 1323F) the gold
reverts to its metallic state. Of course, this stuff isn’t cheap -
figure on paying about $60 for a little bottle containing a couple of
grams of the liquid luster.

Andrew Werby
Juxtamorph.com


#10
if it is porcelain clay the gold is most likely fired on in a kiln
as the last part of the process. I used gold on my porcelain
sculpture in the 70's. The gold comes in a brown liquid form and
is painted on with a sable brush. I believe it is fired at 900
degrees. I used an 019 pyrometric cone to determine when to shut
the kiln down. Has been a long time since I used that material.
Hopes this helps. 

Yes it does, thanks, especially on cone number for firing. I just
replied to Elliot and aked about what goes into the glaze other than
gold and who supplies it. If one knows the composition of the glaze
then I guess it would be possible to buy gold powder and make your
own glaze.


#11
I thought you could only plate in pure gold. 

Plating solutions for gold are putting down a layer that is roughly
23k or better. Plating alloys is very difficult to accomplish. So
the lower karat gold plating is actually a coloring agent to make
the plating look like it is the specified karat material.

James Binnion


#12

Hello Peter

You can google gold ceramic glaze and you will find that Duncan
makes a glaze. I believe Dogwood Ceramics sells it amongst other
suppliers. It comes in 2 gm bottles - tiny. I use it to highlight
some of the ceramic OOAK buttons I make.

Best regards
Barbara


#13

Thank you and others for the on gold ceramic glaze and
suppliers, Barbara. I did a little googling too and found that there
are other gold-coloured glazes which are not Au gold. So we get back
to a long-standing Orchid thread about the philosophy of gilding.

I expect that most of the gold colouring on ceramics which I have
here is only a gold colored glaze and not Au gold. On beauty
criterion there is no difference and on durability the non-Au glaze
is more durable and who cares about “rarity”, the other member of the
3-word mantra? Flesh easting disease is rare.


#14

Peter, I personally don’t care what gilding is sold as long as it is
disclosed to the buyers as what it is. The tiny bits of gold that I
put on the ceramic buttons is au. The good dishes that I have are
also decorated with gold and thanks for bringing up this notion
because I think I am going to use them more often from now on before
passing them on to someone in the next generation who will likely
only sell them! Good luck in making your own little vials of gold.
I’ve been using the little one I have for more than two years now and
it is almost full.

Barbara where the tulips are 4 inches above the ground - finally -
even though there is a couple of feet of snow around the property