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Microfold brake or industrial tube wringer


#1

I want to purchase a tool that will make corrugations in sterling,
and fine silver. I checked the Reo Catalog and find that they carry a
rather expensive Microfold Brake, as well as a rather inexpensive
industrial tube wringer. The difference in price between the two is
almost $200. The major difference that I see is that one will take
much larger sheets of metal. Both will handle metal no thicker than
24 ga. I will probably be working with 26 ga–well within the limits
of both tools.

My question is this. I will be using it only for small items—mostly
earrings, and it will not be getting any heavy use. Will I be making
a mistake to get the less expensive industrial tube wringer instead
of the expensive Microfold Brake?

I am easy on my tools, and never stress them. However I need to be
sure that the smaller model is not just a “toy,” and that I can rely
on it. Thanks for your suggestions.

Alma Rands


#2

Hi Alma,

I have both and if you are just making earrings then the small tube
wringer will work just fine for you.

Another option: the scrapbook stores sell a handheld plastic casing
(metal roller) paper crimper in different designs. I have those also
and they are not very expensive.

I looked them up for you. they are Fiskars wavy paper crimpers and
the online address for them:

http://tinyurl.com/5qfznj

These are $17.99

There are other styles available also: this company sells a 4.5"
http://www.scrap-masters.com/mini-paper-crimper-45wave-p-15669.html
for $5.99

Have fun,

Jennifer Friedman
Ventura, Ca


#3
My question is this. I will be using it only for small
items---mostly earrings, and it will not be getting any heavy use.
Will I be making a mistake to get the less expensive industrial tube
wringer instead of the expensive Microfold Brake? 

I have both of these. The difference is the size of metal you can put
through it. With the tube wringer, you will be able to do very small
pieces, so maybe just earrings. Also, you will not have as much
flexibility in terms of putting metal through in different directions
(say, diagonally).

Also, with the tube wringer you may not be able to “double
corrugate.”

Yet another advantage of the big one is that you can put it in a
vise, so if you’ll be doing production, you’ll want that.

The small one is cheap enough, you could buy it, try it, and upgrade
to the larger if desired.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#4

Alma,

I attended a metal corrigation workshop with Trish McAleer. She had
used an industrial tube wringer. She said it worked well but the
bottom (part that goes into the vise) had collasped over time and
use. I looked at it and thought a body could put a small wooden piece
between the aluminum halves to give it more stability in the vise and
extend the life of the tool. I tend to start with less expensieve
tools and find out if I really would use it enough to justify the
expense. I’ve got some silver foil that I want to try. Let me know
how your earings turn out

Jo T


#5

Alma

I have the industrial tube wringer (25US), a Microfold Brake
(250US), several plastic Paper Crimper and Corrugators (15US) in
straight and wavy patterns that work for well annealed thin metal and
a tool (a 5 blade pipe crimper, 35US) sheet metal workers use to
crimp the ends of large air handling pipe to fit the together. I used
the crimper to good effect before the other tools were popularized.
Then I bought the industrial tube wringer and lusted after the larger
ability of the Microfold Brake, so I bought one. I use the tube
wringer most often (for its intended purpose of squeezing tubes of
glue and for bending metal). I find I can put a deeper crimp in metal
faster with the tube wringer. I only use the Microfold when I need
big sheets, a rare occurrence. Now I am lusting after one of the gold
smithing, small multi size wringers (Cavallin Corrugation Rolling
Mill) that cost 160US. You can also corrugate using a hydraulic press
and pattern sheets, or evenly spaced wires.

I also highly recommend Patricia McAleer’s booklet on Metal
Corrugation, and Repetitive Micro-Fold Forms Using an Industrial Tube
Wringer by Jack Berry.

Be careful, it is addictive.

The bottom line is -go for the tube wringer first, it is
inexpensive, it works, and is useful.

Marlin - in oh so hot Denver with no decent rain for a loooong time.