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Meteorites in jewelry


#1

All, Has anyone that has used nickle iron meteorites in jewelry had
any problems with them rusting as they are made up of nickle and
iron?Also what type of solder methods are used to solder tham to
yellow 18k gold? Thanks J Morley
Coyote Ridge Studio


#2

I have used meteorites in a number of pieces and have never had them
rust on me. I don’t solder them to anything however. I build caps or
bezels for them.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG
Spirer Somes Jewelers
1794 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@spirersomes
http://www.spirersomes.com


#3

I have used gibeon meteorites in jewelery (which are nickel-iron
meteorites) I found out two valuable things about them while working
on them… 1st…keep away from the pickel (may be your source for the
rust) 2…do not heat the meteorites (you will loose the beautiful
etching that can be brought out with a alcohol/nitric acid combo) Have
you seen the damascus meteorite they are doing now??? FABULOUS!!!
good luck… -julia


#4

As I remember, one problem in soldering meteorites is that heating
causes the distinctive crystaline patterns reveled by etching to
disapear as the metal is heated too high. I would consider
mechanically fastening it by way of rivets . I am attaching a link
to a meitorite website. You can find examples of these patterns by
just going to eBay and searching for Meteorite - I got nearly 150
items , many with images.


#5

In the latest issue of Lapidary Journal there is a artical on how to
make a Meteorite ring by Joe Apodaca ,it may answer some of your
questions.


#6

I’ve used meteorites, and yes they will rust. I used a paste wax on
them to alleviate this problem. I’ve not soldered them, I set them
as if they were stones, in bezels.


#7
    All, Has anyone that has used nickle iron meteorites in jewelry
hadany problems with them rusting.... what type of solder methods
are used to solder tham to  yellow 18k gold? 

I soldered a slice of meteorite to silver, and used ordinary silver
solder methods. Of course when I pickled it it all turned pink, but
you soak that away with the hydrogen peroxide/vinegar solution.

To prevent rust I did the same that I do to prevent tarnish–a coat
of Rennaissance wax. I still have the first piece I made that way,
and it hasn’t rusted in the 8 or so years since I did it.


#8

Something that will greatly slow down the rusting process with
meteorites is to treat them like guns. Try going to a gunshop and
getting some gun blue or brown. After I cut/polish a meteorite I use
ferric cloride to etch it which brings out the pattern, when you apply
gun blue after the etch it creates a good effect.

cutter12


#9

Speaking of meteorites, from an English email acquaintance:

“Perseid meteors maximum should be tonight, at about 0300 UK
time…”

(so I went out to look) It’s 2:26am and I just came back from a drive
on country roads. Saw only one meteor the whole time - a bright one
however - and eventually those thin clouds I subconsciously noticed
revealed themselves to be aurora borealis! Once I figured that out the
drive was spectacular; they shimmered from faint white to slightly
orange/peach tone to the north with a bright moon to the southwest. A.

http://www.nas.com/~aheugh/


#10
   All, Has anyone that has used nickle iron meteorites in jewelry
had any problems with them rusting as they are made up of nickle and
iron?Also what type of solder methods are used to solder tham to
yellow 18k gold? Thanks J Morley Coyote Ridge Studio 

They CAN rust, if left exposed to air. Solder to 18K with the solder
of your choice, picked for the 18K, more than the iron. Use a good
paste flux, and the meteoritic iron will adhere just fine. After
polishing and finishing the iron, it etch it with an acid solution of
5 to ten percent acid, diluted with denatured alcohol, rather than
water. That helps to prevent rusting. The acid must be mixed just
prior to use, and disposed of right after etching, I think, as someone
mentioned, the last time I mentioned this recipe, that this mix isn’t
stable. I’ve never had a problem with it, but why take chances.
Anyway, after etching, dry the piece, warm it slightly, and then
protect it with a good furniture wax of some sort, to seal the surface
against moisture. I use just a good quality paste wax, well rubbed
it. the key is that the iron started out very clean and dry, and the
wax well penetrates the pores of the metal. If metal is exposed at
the surface, it’s the exterior of the grains, not the pores. So it
then doesn’t rust. At least, it hasn’t done it to me…

Peter Rowe


#11

I have been hunting for Rennaissance wax for 3 years - does any one
have an address where it can be purchased? thanks in advance. Aileen
Geddes


#12

Light Impressions sells it. 1-800-828-6216 or check out their web
site www.lightimpressionsdirect.com I just called them and told them
what I want. They were kind enough to look up the cat # and viola.
Bought the jar almost 3 years ago and not even half way down.

Barb McLaughlin


#13

Barb, Do these people sell Meterorites, I went to the website and
they are advertising archival products? Susan Chastain