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Metal Tes Strainers


#1

Does anyone know if the metal mesh-spring tea strainers are
pickle-safe stainless steel? I wanted to use it for sulfuric acid
pickle, but was afraid it (or some part of it) might contaminate.

Janet


#2

I’d be careful before using metal tea strainers in pickle. You
might want to test it first by putting it in some pickle with a bit
of scrap silver. If the strainer is not entirely stainless, you
will get a copper coating on your silver. i have several strainers
which are supposed to be stainless, but notice that there is some
rust around the hinge areas. Mine are the kind that form a ball
into which one puts the tea. . This is not a stain caused by the
tea, but actual rust probably coming from the hinge pin. So do
test yours to be sure that there is no possibility of
contamination. Alma


#3
 Does anyone know if the metal mesh-spring tea strainers are
pickle-safe stainless steel?  

I know that the basket mesh and holders are stainless, but I use the
plastic tea strainer because I wasn’t certain if the rivet and spring
on the stainless were actually stainless. I did find a stainless
steel mesh basket at Starbucks to put in the pickle pot; it is about
half cup size. Donna in VA


#4
      Does anyone know if the metal mesh-spring tea strainers are
pickle-safe stainless steel? I wanted to use it for sulfuric acid
pickle, but was afraid it (or some part of it) might contaminate. 

Dear Janet I have used the tea strainer without any problems,
however I did remove the closing latch which is not stainless and
replaced it with a copper jump ring to effect the closure. Joe Dule


#5
   Does anyone know if the metal mesh-spring tea strainers are
pickle-safe stainless steel? I wanted to use it for sulfuric acid
pickle, but was afraid it (or some part of it) might
contaminate. Janet 

There are different manufacturers. Some of them might be, but I’ve
seen some where the mesh is stainless, but the frame is not, and
beyond that, not all stainless will withstand pickle. In fact, most
of it won’t stand extended immersion.without etching some. for my
money, I’d save this device for the ultreasonic and steamer. the
pickle pot, after all, seldom allows you to blast something around the
room as the steamer does, so the covered basket may be overkill. How
’bout just empty plastic container, perhaps a film can, and punching
a bunch of holes in it with a small drill. some of the film
containers are almost clear, making seeing your work in the bottom
easy, and if you do this with a small drill, it can still stop tiny
things from escaping. Might drain slower than your mesh screen, but
you don’t then risk contaminating your pickle, and it’s a lot cheaper
too. install a bit of copper wire bent into a hook through a drill
hole near the edge, and you can hang it in the pickle better than
those tea strainers too. In our shop, we’ve got a number of such
small plastic baskets, improvised from several sources. There’s the
film cans, as I noted, which have the small advantage of also having
tight covers, in case that’s needed, (drill the covers too). And
larger ones made from the caps of empty spray cans, as well as other
small plastic jars… Easy and quick to make, and free.

Peter