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MEK safety issues


#1
MEK =  methyl ethyl ketone 

Are there any safety issues with having MEK around the studio? These
days everything seems to have a warning or some safety thing you
have to comply with.

Jerry


#2

MEK or 2- butanone is not nice stuff to just keep around and use
indiscriminately.

UK msads:
http://ptcl.chem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/BU/2-butanone.html

US msds
http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/m4628.htm

jesse


#3
    Are there any safety issues with having MEK around the studio? 

Absolutely. Here’s a good link to some info that includes an MSDS
sheet on MEK (AKA acetone):
http://www.seahawkpaints.com/msds/methylethylketone.pdf

You’ll need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it.

James in SoFl


#4

Hello Jerry and Orchidians,

Jerry wondered about MEK safety issues. The Agency for Toxic
Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), part of the U.S. Dept. of
Heatlh and Human Services, has online answers for such questions. I
think everyone should add this website to their favorites
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov

Whenever you wonder about some chemical exposure, search on the
ATSDR website for answers.

Judy in Kansas, where I’ve got the first outdoor show of the year
tomorrow - hoping it’s a nice, sunny spring day!!


#5

Judy,

Thank you, as that I was exposed to a couple of nasty chemicals
earlier in life, I try to be aware of what is in my shop, it’s
dangers and also what my people are doing with such materials.

Again thanks,
Jerry


#6

Hi Jerry:

I believe that the faceters have found that having M.E.K. around
can do two things–when heated, it lets off a gas that causes instant
pnemonia. I have also heard that getting a drop in your eye causes
almost instant blindness–there is no antidote to my knowledge. I’m
sorry I don’t have the research article at hand–the the red flags
started waving when I read the initials. Maybe others will have
more info.

Vi Jones rocks1x1vi.george (at) verizon.net

Where spring is beautiful in the Pacific Northwest and we’re
getting ready to host the International Jewelers Workshop on May 14 &
15. Hope to see some of you here!


#7

Jerry,

MEK had been taken out of the aeronautics manufacturing arena, and
probably for good reason. The first that comes to mind is
flammability. That could be followed closely be cancer causing fumes
and liquids when used and/or spilled or splashed on any part of the
hand/arm/body. Talk to your chemical supplier (or one of the ones
listed here) and request the MSDS for MEK. After carefully reading
(or studying) that document, you just might want to find another
solvent to help in your shop.

Just thoughts from a former aircraft worker (now retired). Jim Good
(@James_E_Good1)


#8
    Absolutely. Here's a good link to some info that includes an
MSDS sheet on MEK (AKA acetone):
http://www.seahawkpaints.com/msds/methylethylketone.pdf 

Hey James Acetone is a totally different beast. Acetone is (CH3)2CO
and MEK is C4H8O .

Jim Binnion

James Binnion Metal Arts
Phone (360) 756-6550
Toll Free (877) 408 7287
Fax (360) 756-2160


@James_Binnion
Member of the Better Business Bureau


#9
    I believe that the faceters have found  that having M.E.K.
around can do two things--when heated, it lets off a gas that
causes instant pnemonia.  I have also heard that getting a drop in
your eye causes almost instant blindness--there is no antidote to
my knowledge.  I'm sorry I don't have the research article at
hand--the the red flags started waving when I read the initials. 
Maybe others will have more info. 

You are referring to Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide which is a totally
different chemical. It is used as a catalyst for curing polyester
(polystyrene) resin. It is known to cause blindness if immediate and
through eye washing is not accomplished. It is a highly reactive
compound and should be handled with care. I could not find any
references to pneumonia symptoms from breathing it. I have used a
lot it in one of my first jobs many years ago. We had more health
problems from exposure to styrene vapors than the MEK Peroxide.

Jim
Jim Binnion

James Binnion Metal Arts
Phone (360) 756-6550
Toll Free (877) 408 7287
Fax (360) 756-2160


@James_Binnion
Member of the Better Business Bureau


#10
    MEK had been taken out of the aeronautics manufacturing arena,
and probably for good reason. The first that comes to mind is
flammability.  That could be followed closely be cancer causing
fumes and liquids when used and/or spilled or splashed on any part
of the hand/arm/body. 

It has a flash point of 19 F or -7 C so it is very flammable and
can easily lead to explosions if the vapor is allowed to collect
anywhere.

It is not listed as carcinogenic on any of the MSDS I looked at. It
is however teratogenic (Embryo or Fetus death or development
abnormalities) and mutagenic (reproductive chromosome damage) so I
would not want it in my shop.

Jim
Jim Binnion

James Binnion Metal Arts
Phone (360) 756-6550
Toll Free (877) 408 7287
Fax (360) 756-2160


@James_Binnion
Member of the Better Business Bureau