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Master Jeweler


#1

To All:
I keep seeing local advertisements listing the jewelers with having XX
number of years experience and calling themselves MASTER JEWELERS. Can
anyone tell me what the qualifications for being a MASTER JEWELER are?
I grew up in the industry and have been a professional bench jeweler for
more that 28 years. Does that qualify me to be a MASTER JEWELER?
Thanks in advance for the clarification.
Regards to All,

Roger W. Kitchens

Home Page: http://web2.airmail.net/rogerk


#2

Rodger-

In some European countries where there are craft guilds such as Germany
and England, etc. they have a pretty strict system. I isn’t like the
USA where any one can hang out a shingle and say they are a “Master
Jeweler”. From what I understand, there is a system of training that
starts when you are in high school, you become an apprentice jeweler.
As you progress with your teacher you move up the ladder till you are a
master.

I dunno this make any sense, or it’s getting late :slight_smile:

Peter


#3

I keep seeing local advertisements listing the jewelers with having XX
number of years experience and calling themselves MASTER JEWELERS. Can
anyone tell me what the qualifications for being a MASTER JEWELER are?
I grew up in the industry and have been a professional bench jeweler for
more that 28 years. Does that qualify me to be a MASTER JEWELER?
Thanks in advance for the clarification.

Seems to me that in the really old days, after one served an

apprenticeship, he went on the road for more training and/or experience.
These guys were called journeymen. When one pretty well had his craft down,
he would put down roots, hang a shingle and become a master. That is, he had
learned virtually as much as he could as a student and was now really on his
own with all of the responsibilities.
There are schools in Europe where one can be certified as a master,
but I don’t think that it really means the same thing. I’ve been working on
the bench for 26 years. The only certificate I was ever offered was the one
I got after aserving a 4 year apprenticeship that called me a jewelry
repairman.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.


#4

Roger,
Hello how are you? I guess you are new here. Welcome… Anyway, after 28 years
at the bench i would probably consider you to be a master jeweler by this
time. However I do not know exactly what constitutes one as being a master…
Have you heard that (I beleive it is GIA ) there is now a qualification exam
one can take in the U.S. that qualifies a bench jeweler in one of many
catagories… Off hand I beleive the first catagory would be "Benach Jeweler"
the second is “Senior Bench Jeweler” and the third is "Master Bench Jeweler"
all being qualified on the basis of how well you do in the exam. This is only
what I have read. I do not know for sure really how it works… Check it out,
if you find anything interesting let me know, please. On the subject of what
people consider themselves, well I tend to get really annoyed when a Jewelry
Store owner advertises that they are Master jewelers… this drives me nuts, as
I have seen the work these people are putting out. Their work is terrible! I
take an extreme amount of pride in what I do as a Jeweler. I never let
anything out of my site until I would let my own mother wear it. And I am very
picky. There are very few good jewelers who care about what kind of work they
do for their customers around here. Sometimes I really think as long as they
get paid, they don’t care. The way I look at it when my work goes out the
door, I make sure that if another jeweler who knew what they were doing looked
at it, they would find no faults with it. I also realize that a jeweler NEVER
knows everything and that there is always room for improvement… I wish the
other jewelers in my area would learn to take the pride in there work that I
do.
Well if you ever do find out when one is considered a “Master Jeweler”…let
me know…
Marc Williams
tdwgold@msn.comFrom: owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Roger W. Kitchens
Sent: Monday, October 07, 1996 9:20 PM
To: orchid@ganoksin.com
Subject: Master Jeweler

To All:
I keep seeing local advertisements listing the jewelers with having XX
number of years experience and calling themselves MASTER JEWELERS. Can
anyone tell me what the qualifications for being a MASTER JEWELER are?
I grew up in the industry and have been a professional bench jeweler for
more that 28 years. Does that qualify me to be a MASTER JEWELER?
Thanks in advance for the clarification.
Regards to All,

Roger W. Kitchens

Home Page: http://web2.airmail.net/rogerk

procedures


#5

At 01:20 AM 10/8/96 +0000, you wrote:

To All:
I keep seeing local advertisements listing the jewelers with having XX
number of years experience and calling themselves MASTER JEWELERS. Can
anyone tell me what the qualifications for being a MASTER JEWELER are?
I grew up in the industry and have been a professional bench jeweler for
more that 28 years. Does that qualify me to be a MASTER JEWELER?
Thanks in advance for the clarification.

Regards to All,

Roger W. Kitchens

Roger, believe it or not, the term “Master Jeweler” is meaningless. Forunately,
the Jewelers Of America in conjunction with the GIA and the Texas Institute
of Jewelry Technology in Paris Texas are developing a new certification for
bench jewelers.
There will be different levels of certification. First is certified bench
jeweler technician, second is bench jeweler, third is senior bench jeweler,
and fourth is master bench jeweler. The JA is accepting applications, you
can call at (212) 768-8777. Hope that helps some! Richard Laspada


#6

I’ve been following the Master Jeweler thread the last few days. As Richard
Laspada indicated there is a plan by GIA, JA & Paris JC to provide a series of
tests qualifying one as having some defined set of skills.

What I’d like to see is a publication of those skills required for each level of
expertise. It seems they should be published in all the jewelry industry mags.
That’d give them broad exposure and may even enccourage some folks to sharpen
their skills. The other question that needs to be answered is: Is there a ‘hands
on’ test or is it just a multiple guess written test? Where does one go to
apply?

An honest classification system, controlled by craftsmen, not marketeers can
only help the industry in the US.

Dave


#7

David D. Arens wrote:

I’ve been following the Master Jeweler thread the last few days. As Richard
Laspada indicated there is a plan by GIA, JA & Paris JC to provide a series of
tests qualifying one as having some defined set of skills.

What I’d like to see is a publication of those skills required for each level of
expertise. It seems they should be published in all the jewelry industry mags.
That’d give them broad exposure and may even enccourage some folks to sharpen
their skills. The other question that needs to be answered is: Is there a ‘hands
on’ test or is it just a multiple guess written test? Where does one go to
apply?

An honest classification system, controlled by craftsmen, not marketeers can
only help the industry in the US.

Dave

orchid@ganoksin.com

I agree that a qualifying test for necessary skills to be called a
goldsmith, would weed out the scammers that are giving the rest of us
goldsmiths a bad name. I’ve seen alot of garbage out there created by so
callesd “goldsmiths”. This is a bit discerning for us old timmers.


#8

The other question that needs to be answered is: Is there a ‘hands
on’ test or is it just a multiple guess written test? Where does one go to
apply?

Dave, the test is proctored at YOUR workdesk if you so desire, it is a PRACTICAL
exam you must do actual goldsmithing. To apply call the phone number on my
first
letter (I’d have to go look it up again and I feel lazy :>)

                Richard Laspada

#9

David D. Arens wrote:

I’ve been following the Master Jeweler thread the last few days. As Richard
Laspada indicated there is a plan by GIA, JA & Paris JC to provide a series of
tests qualifying one as having some defined set of skills.

What I’d like to see is a publication of those skills required for each level of
expertise. It seems they should be published in all the jewelry industry mags.
That’d give them broad exposure and may even enccourage some folks to sharpen
their skills. The other question that needs to be answered is: Is there a ‘hands
on’ test or is it just a multiple guess written test? Where does one go to
apply?

An honest classification system, controlled by craftsmen, not marketeers can
only help the industry in the US.

Dave

procedures

Dave,
Where did our apprentice system go anyway.I find it sad that the U.S.
no longer encourages apprentice programs in fact quite the opposite.The
cost of insurance and other expenses necessitated by government
regulations make apprentices very costly.At least this is the way I see
it…Gavin


#10

Gavin Gilmore wrote:

David D. Arens wrote:

I’ve been following the Master Jeweler thread the last few days. As Richard
Laspada indicated there is a plan by GIA, JA & Paris JC to provide a series of
tests qualifying one as having some defined set of skills.

What I’d like to see is a publication of those skills required for each level of
expertise. It seems they should be published in all the jewelry industry mags.
That’d give them broad exposure and may even enccourage some folks to sharpen
their skills. The other question that needs to be answered is: Is there a ‘hands
on’ test or is it just a multiple guess written test? Where does one go to
apply?

An honest classification system, controlled by craftsmen, not marketeers can
only help the industry in the US.

Dave

procedures

Dave,
Where did our apprentice system go anyway.I find it sad that the U.S.
no longer encourages apprentice programs in fact quite the opposite.The
cost of insurance and other expenses necessitated by government
regulations make apprentices very costly.At least this is the way I see
it…Gavin

orchid@ganoksin.com

OK, OK. Having just done time as a jeweler in Sacramento, CA, I feel
confident in imparting the qualifications there to hang out the " MASTER
JEWELER" tag.

  1. No chain solder can consist of less than 1/2 dwt of solder, nor span
    less than one inch of chain.
  2. Any sizing must deplete the overall width of the ring shank by no
    less than 1mm.
  3. One must develop an extremely condescending attitude towards all
    others in the trade and treat them accordingly.
  4. As opposed to presenting facts to your clients, you must try to
    baffle them with techno-jargon BS.
  5. Never, but NEVER, do a repair either to the best of your ability, or
    in less than 5 minutes!

Ok, so we may never hang out our shingles as masters, but we may,
possibly, retain just a bit of pride and/or dignity. Mike


#11

Dave,

Where did our apprentice system go anyway.I find it sad that the U.S.
no longer encourages apprentice programs in fact quite the opposite.The cost of insurance and other expenses necessitated by
government regulations make apprentices very costly.At least this is the
way I see it…
Gavin

Gavin,
Must be we are looking through the same loupe, Cause that is the
way I see it also…Was a point in time where apprentices were
incouraged and accepted by business, Cheap labor in return for a
education and those who completed a full apprentiship were in most
likelyhood guaranteed a job. With the changes to the employment laws,
Apprentices had to be treated as equals,Like you said same med ins, life
ins, disability, unemployment, workman comp etc…So for a little bit
more in salary why, why not hire a person that makes fewer mistakes, and
can operate without supervision…I remember when The gov. gave tax
incentives, paid part of salary, and so on. What we had then was
people wanting to learn and we could afford to teach… no more…
In respect to the master Jewelers certification…I think it is
a great idea and will qualify myself… but for another perspective…
in the litegious society in which we live the use of the word "master"
with in most likely hood lend those who flant it to a stronger
possibility of suscessful litigation against them… I believe that the
courts will view the elite of any field as being more responsible than
the rest.? " Masters donot make mistakes "
Just my unsoliciated two cents…
Thanks and best wishes
cj
G.B.A. Ltd.
Gemstone Brockerage Associates Ltd. Telephone (518)
438-5487
P.O. Box 8930
Albany, New York 12208

INTERNET ADDRESS Http://www.bizpro.com/gba
Http://www.polygon.net/~3576
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Mike Rogers wrote:


#12

Hi Gavin,

I don’t know about the rest of the world, but the I think the thing that’s
caused the biggest problem in the US is our litigaous society & penchant for
’easy money’. The best thing that could happen here is all law schools would be
closed for at least 10 years.

I could never understand why the world is better off because we have so many
lawyers. A good craftsman, jeweler, carpenter, mechanic, plumber, whatever, does
more to benefit the human race in 1 day than most lawyers do in a lifetime.

OK, I’ll get off the soap box now.

Dave


#13

Please review the profession of ‘Accountant’ … a position the creation
of which was caused by OUR government … due to taxes… my guess is that
prior to the federal tax revenue there were no accounts… yes bookkeepers,
financiers… but not accountants as they do and exist today!

Jim

At 11:29 PM 10/9/96 EDT, you wrote:

Hi Gavin,

I don’t know about the rest of the world, but the I think the thing that’s
caused the biggest problem in the US is our litigaous society & penchant for
’easy money’. The best thing that could happen here is all law schools would be
closed for at least 10 years.

I could never understand why the world is better off because we have so many
lawyers. A good craftsman, jeweler, carpenter, mechanic, plumber, whatever,
does