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Masking sandblasting


#1

Does anyone have a paint-on masking that will mask when
sandblasting. I have tried fingernail polish and the like but
have only found tape to be reliable, but not fuild enough for
curves unless I cut it. It would sure be nice to paint on
something. Mark P.


#2

Mark said,

Does anyone have a paint-on masking that will mask when
sandblasting.

Try rubber cement, the kind used for gluing paper together.
Office supply stores carry it.

Dave


#3
Does anyone have a paint-on masking that will mask when
sandblasting. I have tried fingernail polish and the like but
have only found tape to be reliable, but not fuild enough for
curves unless I cut it. It would sure be nice to paint on
something. Mark P.

Try Plastidip. It’s used for coating tool handles. You will have
to be careful about how you apply it so that it is easy to
remove when you are done.

Brett


#4

Hi Mark,

Reactive Metals Studio (reactive@sedona.net) has just what
you’re looking for! I was “conversing” with Bill Seeley about
it, and their blasting unit, a few months back.

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#5
Does anyone have a paint-on masking that will mask when
sandblasting. I have tried fingernail polish and the like but
have only found tape to be reliable, but not fuild enough for
curves unless I cut it. It would sure be nice to paint on
something. Mark P.

Mark-

There is a photoresist that is used in the engraving industry
that works well, although it is not a paint on type like you
asked. Don’t know of any of this type, but I have used this other
with excellent results. You take this film and like say a drawing
or photocopy, put the artwork on top of the resist and expose it
to UV (sunlight will also work, but pure UV works better). After
doing this, you rinse the sheet of resist off in water and the
dark areas of your artwork become voids or blank spaces in the
resist. You then apply this resist to your subject piece, it
adheres without glue or any other adhesive. You then are ready to
blast, the dark areas of your artwork becoming the blasted
portions. Afterwards you peel off the resist. Curved, round or
irregular shaped objects are no problem for this stuff. It
adheres well to most anything except porous surfaces. Here are
some companies that carry it:

Photoabrasive Systems@ 800-643-1037
www.photoabrasivesystems.com 4832 Grand Ave. Duluth, Minn. 55807
Rayzist Photomask @ 800-729-9478 955 Park Center Drive, Vista,
Calif. 92083

Cooper Graphics @800-996-6276 156 Thomasmill Rd. Holly Springs,
NC 27540 (DuPont RapidMask)

This DuPont one is a new one, supposedly very good. Most of
these companies will even send you a free sample and instructions
on how to use it or send them the artwork and they will make the
masks for you for a small charge.

I want to say $0.11 a sq. ft. is what this resist costs, but it
could be SQ. IN. I think I’m getting dyslexic or something! Must
be all those cadmium fumes or hydrocyanic gas we’re breathing
doing this dangerous jewelry work.[grin] Hope this helps you. Ricky
Low Jeweler and Engraver Houston


#6

PLEASE NOTE! I DON’T KNOW FOR SURE THIS WORKS!

Sorry to yell…just wanted to make it clear off the bat that I
was told about this by a source but have never tried it myself as
a mask…rubber cement and or elmers glue. Something about the
cements tackiness keeping it in place and gathering the particles
being shot at it protecting the glue, no idea if it’s accurate. I
have no idea about the thick coat of Elmers but was told it
works…no idea of how to remove afterwards.

Besides tape, a good stick on is contact paper…

Have a great labor day…for me it will be just like it sounds,
down in the studio working (albeit a labor of love) (Hey…anyone
an English major, my dictionary has two spellings for
labor/labour)

Karen
@Karenworks


#7
an English major, my dictionary has two spellings for
labor/labour)

G’day Karen. The “correct” spelling is ‘labour.’ Then there is
’jewellery’, ‘aluminium’, ‘colour’ … heaps of others. My
son reckons that Americans can’t spell! :slight_smile: No, I’m not what
you call an English major, but Mr Major Boyce, also on this list,
is. However, I do happen to be English. Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#8

Elmer’s Glue is water based and should wash off with water. I
don’t know about the others . . .

I use elmer’s for glueing paper patterns to sheet metal for saw
piercing. I put the piece in the ultrasonic and it dissolves the
glue.

Rick
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#9
  Try Plastidip. It's used for coating tool handles. You will
have to be careful about how you apply it so that it is easy to
remove when you are done.

Great idea Brett, Thanks Mark P.


#10
Low Jeweler and Engraver Houston 

What an unusual solution, Thanks alot. Mark P.


#11
 Elmer's Glue is water based and should wash off with water. 
I I use elmer's for glueing paper patterns to sheet metal for
saw piercing. I put the piece in the ultrasonic and it
dissolves the glue.

I use a product called “sticky back” paper. It is a type of
contact paper available at a copy center. It is clear and
adhesive backed. I can run it through the copy machine for exact
duplicates and multiples, or just trace or draw on it. Saw
through it and peel off…pretty simple and inexpensive. A sheet
runs about a dollar, but lasts for a long time.

Karen


#12

You can look at hobby shops for masking materials, there are
several some of which come in designs you peel & stick and also
for liquid mask. A hobby shop which sells R.C. &/or RR models
should have them.