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Making odd shaped jump rings


#1

I realize that making jump rings is very basic, but 3 questions I
need advice:

  1. How do you make different shaped jumps, like ovals, squares, etc?

  2. How can I look at a piece and determine the size of jump ring to
    make? I can’t tell if you measure the mm from the inside of a
    drilled hole to 2nd drilled hole, or from edge of piece to edge of
    piece. Does my question make sense?

  3. what is the best way to cut a coil into jumps and not
    crush/deform the rings? Can you cut them from the inside out by
    sliding the coil onto the saw blade? Or is is best to cut them from
    the outside/top?

thx!
brenda


#2
1. How do you make different shaped jumps, like ovals, squares,
etc? 

Different shaped mandrels if you have them… pliers/freehand if you
don’t

2. How can I look at a piece and determine the size of jump ring
to make? I can't tell if you measure the mm from the inside of a
drilled hole to 2nd drilled hole, or from edge of piece to edge of
piece. Does my question make sense? 

Not really, I presume you are adding a jumpring through a drilled
hole so that a bail can be attached or a chain run through it. The
hole will determine the gauge of wire to use. If the hole is drilled
1 mm down from the edge of the piece, you need to figure that
measurement if you want anything that is attached to free flow within
the ring. For examplee: Say you are connecting 2 24g copper discs.
Each disk has a 20guage hole drilled .5 mm from he edge. you will
need a jumpring with at least a 1 mm inner diameter. This ring would
tightly press the edges of the discs together… so figure an
additional .5 to 1 mm on the inner diameter of the jumpring, and it
should swing nicely. It depends on what you’re after. Always work
with inner diameter when it comes to jumprings… whether its for
chainmaille or just connectors. this will make your life much easier.

3. what is the best way to cut a coil into jumps and not
crush/deform the rings? Can you cut them from the inside out by
sliding the coil onto the saw blade? Or is is best to cut them
from the outside/top? 

Short answer is whatever wrks for you. I have heard threading a
sawblade though the could make cutting easier, but I just don’t see
it. I firmly hold the coil between thumb and forfinger resting it
inside the cup of my hand, and let the saw do the work. The blade
usually only contacts/cuts 2-3 rings at a time, the top activly being
cut through, and the next two having a guiding grove cut for the next
complete cut.

There is no need to hold the coil in a deathgrip. If you find
yourself having to do that, chances are the blade is dull, or has
insufficient lubrication.


#3

Brenda,

You can purchase oval jump rings from MS Company in Rhode Island.
Very high quality. I have purchased square jump rings, I think from
Rio.

Best, MA


#4

Making oval, square, triangular or diamond shaped jump rings of
various sizes and wire diameters is easy if you have a genuine Jump
Ringer. All you need is a set of Jump Ringer assorted sized mandrels
of the desired shape to wind them. The rings are then cut while in
the mandrel for removal. These are available from your tool supplier.

Ray Grossman


#5

I have either the square or triangular mandrels and can’t get my
wire off after it was wound. Any suggestions?

Francesca


#6

Francesca,

The reason wire has a difficulty getting off of odd shaped mandrels
is normally due to the fact that it unwinds a bit and binds agains
the edge of the mandrel. If you anneal the wire it should lose it’s
tension and you’ll be able to push it down the spindle. If you
continue to have trouble wrap the mandrel with a layer of paper
spiraled around in an even manner. Then when you anneal the wire it
will burn away leaving you with extra space to move the coil down and
off of the spindle.

Scott
in Oakland, CA
where the weather is cooling although still quite beautiful.


#7

Wrap your mandrel with a piece of paper before you wind the wire. It
works for me, however, I’m using fewer and fewer odd shaped rings
because I have trouble getting them to lay smoothly when a necklace
containing them is worn.


#8

Yes very true, wrap tissue paper around an oval or square mandrel
before putting your wire around for oval or add shaped jump rings.
Once you burn off the tissue paper you will be able to slide off the
spiral of wrapped wire due to the extra space that was created by
burning off the tissue paper. When cutting the spiral into individual
jump rings, I always thread my saw blade inside the spiral and slowly
saw through the first ring and then next etc. works very well. Sigi

Sigi Eurich


#9

Hi Francesca!

I have either the square or triangular mandrels and can't get my
wire off after it was wound. Any suggestions? 

Wrap a few layers of paper around the mandrel. After wrapping the
wire around it, heat it to burn the paper off. You should then be
able to slide your links off easily. You will probably want to
experiment to see how thick a layer of paper you need. For round
links, very little will do the trick, but I reckon that for a
triangular rod, you may need a few layers.

Janet in Jerusalem


#10
I have either the square or triangular mandrels and can't get my
wire off after it was wound. Any suggestions? 

If you have a GENUINE Jump Ringer you can cut them while still on
the mandrel using its circular saw and depth of cut adjustment. They
will then come off the mandrel easily.

Ray Grossman


#11

I’ve browsed home depot or lowes finding steel rods in different
shapes and thicknesses. Anneal your metal and wrap it around for how
many rings you need. Then use a saw blade or cut off disc to make
them individual.

Have fun! Kim


#12

If you use wooden dowels (local DIY stores can supply a surprisingly
large assortment) you can cut the jump rings still on the dowel so
they retain their shape.


#13

Hi Francesca One idea I tried for oval rings was to wrap a length of
thin paper - like tissue paper - around the mandrel first, then the
wire.

After you finish wrapping your coil, just heat the wire with a
torch, the paper will burn off and release the wire, it should come
off easily. Best wishes, Philip in sunny Nelson in early spring !