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Making Hercules Knot


#1

I am trying to find instructions on how to make the "Hercules Knot"
in chain making. Can you tell me how to make this
Greek-style chain link or do you know of a source?

Thank you.


#2

“Making Silver Chains” by Glen F. Waszek has a chain called “Knotted
Link Chain.” It links what I would call Hercules knots together with
jump rings.

marilyn smith

Making Silver Chains: Simple Techniques, Beautiful Designs
By Glen Waszek


Price: $14.95

Media: Paperback
Manufacturer : Lark
Release data : 30 June, 2001


#3

I looked in my chain books, but did not find a style with that name.
I’m sure I’ve seen it somewhere, but I can’t remember what it looks
like. Can you provide us with an example, description, or picture of
some kind? It may be in the books, but under another name.

M’lou Brubaker, Jeweler
Goodland, MN
www.craftswomen.com


#4

I was looking yesterday also for the Hercules knot. I think that it’s
also known by the name ‘love knot’. It’s the two interlocking pieces
of wire.

Patti


#5

I googled “hercules knot” and found theres quite a few references to
the knot from ancient times, and some jewellery examples using
beads, however the instructionals required the purchase of various
books, but the is there.

One link i found which has a picture of a hercules knot is at:

http://www.mmmbeads.com/herculesknot.htm

The picture indicates that a Hercules knot consists of two rope loops
which come together by threading over each other. with ropes it could
be achieved by taking two pieces of rope (for arguments sake 1 foot
long), folding each to make a loop. hold the loops so that they
overlap, with the ends being at opposite ends, so that you could hold
the ends and let the loops dangle from the centre. Then take the loop
belonging to the left rope, and feed the loop beloning to the right
rope through it so that only about 2 or so inches or loop is through
the hole. and then feed the rope ends up through that second loop
(the one belonging to the right rope) and pull the ends of the ropes
away from each other. This way you can see how a hercules knot gets
its name. No matter how much you pull, (or conversly how much torque
is on the rope) this knot will never loosen, and it does not matter
if the knot loosens too much as the loops are bound, not the rope.

In jewellery applications it is a pretty knot which could have
ancient, or celtic appearance and could be made to bind sections of
jewellery together.


#6
One link i found which has a picture of a hercules knot is at:
http://www.mmmbeads.com/herculesknot.htm

That looks like what I’ve always called a reef knot.

Sojourner


#7
 http://www.mmmbeads.com/herculesknot.htm 

The Hercules knot pictured is in fact the well known square knot.

Jerry in Kodiak


#8

Hi,

The book, ‘Chain Making Link by Link’ has instructions for making a
Heracles Knot chain on page 6 of the 1st section. The book is
available from Rio Grande & I’m sure from other suppliers as well.

Basically the chain is made of links that have been soldered & then
formed into a shape with one large round end & one small round end.
The small end of 1 link is inserted through the large part of the
other link so that the small part of each link are at the extreme
right & left ends of the assembly…

Dave


#9
   That looks like what I've always called a reef knot.

You’re correct, it is a reef or square knot. Different name, same
knot. The reef knot has been used from the early days of sailing
vessels to the present to tie in the reef points in a sail. The knot
is easily “upset” so that when it comes time to “shake out” a reef
it can be done quickly and easily. If you pass one of the working
ends back through the knot you have a "slipped " reef knot which
makes it even quicker. An earlier post mentioned the possibility
that the Hercules knot was also called a “love knot” . They must
have been referring to what is called in common usage the “true
love” or “true lover’s” knot. This is a knot used for many years as
tokens of everlasting love between the sailor who spent much of his
life at sea, and his wife or sweetheart who spent those long lonely
days and nights (the sailor hoped) without him. The knot is two half
hitches tied with their loops or bights intertwined and the standing
parts joined to form two ring shanks. Thus, while the knots stay
locked together (the couple), the shanks (the two individuals) are
apart… If you tie the two knots together properly and draw them
taught they appear to become one.

Jerry in Kodiak (a sailor who has “swallowed the anchor”)


#10
I googled "hercules knot" and found theres quite a few references
to the knot from ancient times, and some jewellery examples using
beads, however the instructionals required the purchase of various
books, but the is there. 

It’s a classic “square” knot, or “reef” knot. Right over left, left
over right. It just looks different when it’s done in a wider
material and flattened out.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL
@Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org


#11

If you have access to the April, 2005 copy of JCK, part 1, check
page 102. The second, third and fourth bracelets from the top are
made using the “Hercules knot”. The method of construction is
obvious.

Jerry in Kodiak


#12
   It's a classic "square" knot, or "reef" knot.  Right over left,
left over right.  It just looks different when it's done in a wider
material and flattened out. 

But when you translate the reef knot to metal how does one go about
it. The metal isnt soft enough without breaking to just tie as you
would with a rope.

Trevor from australia


#13
When you translate the reef knot to metal how does one go about it.
The metal isnt soft enough without breaking to just tie as you
would with a rope. 

Actually, you can tie it as you would a rope, especially if you use
high karat wire. You have to work it a bit but it can be worked down.
A better way is to make two loops or rings of the wire. Place a rod,
a drill will do, of the size you wish the larger loop to be in your
bench vise.Place the loop over this rod. Using a smaller rod, insert
it in the other end of the loop and pull taut (Taught?). I forget.
Anyhow, do this with both loops. You now have two elongated loops,
each with one end larger than the other end. Feed the small end of
each loop through the larger end of the other and pull tight. (Same
thing just different spelling). You may have to work this a little
bit too, but it goes easier if you grease it a little bit. Patroleum
jelly works for this.

Jerry in Kodiak


#14

Hi Trevor,

 But when you translate the reef knot to metal how does one go
about it. The metal isn't soft enough without breaking to just tie
as you would with a rope. 

Typically, when used in a chain, the ‘knot’ is made from 2 individual
links. The links are formed similar to a tear drop that has had a
neck formed into it a little way from the small end… The small end
of 1 link is inserted through the larger end of the 2nd link. Since
the links are all the same size, they won’t slide through each other.
Obviously, all the links need to be solder/fused prior to forming if
this is a handmade chain.

Dave