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Making earring backs?


#1

Hi,

I found this article about making your own earring posts:

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to mention anything about making the
backs for them! Any ideas?

Thanks!
-m


#2
Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to mention anything about making
the backs for them! Any ideas?

The way those are made is:

Imagine taking a store bought earring back and flattening it out –
see that shape? That’s your shape, now saw it out, drill a hole in
the middle, and roll up the two sides to the middle.

I’m sure this is covered in a book somewhere, for more detail.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#3
Imagine taking a store bought earring back and flattening it out
-- see that shape? That's your shape, now saw it out, drill a hole
in the middle, and roll up the two sides to the middle. 

Oh, are we talking about the clutch? To me, the earring back would
be the post, so I didn’t get it.

If you mean the clutch, there is a really nice, clear video among
the ones that have accumulated here on Ganoksin.

Noel


#4
If you mean the clutch, there is a really nice, clear video among
the ones that have accumulated here on Ganoksin. 

I had no luck finding the video on the site. If you have a link that
would be great!


#5

Another thing to be concerned with in making these is the metal
itself…It should be made of a different alloy to get the
tension…

Russ Hyder
www.thejewelrycadinstitute.com


#6
Another thing to be concerned with in making these is the metal
itself....It should be made of a different alloy to get the
tension... 

Depending on the metals used and the chemistry of the wearer, this
can cause problems with galvanic reaction.

I can’t count the times I had sore or raw earlobes as a young woman.
(I do not have a nickel allergy.)

For years I “solved” the problem by using sterling silver shepherd
hooks or gold posts with gold clutches. It wasn’t until years later
that I found the true cause was using earring backs (often nickel or
"stainless") that were of different metal than the posts and that the
naturally moist, salty environment of the skin completed the
requirements for a “battery”.

I believe that work-hardening the sheet for the clutch and
adjustment of the coils can create sufficient tension for the clutch.
I like to have a groove around the post for the clutch coils to
"snap" into for added security.

HTH
Pam
Pam Chott
www.songofthephoenix.com


#7

That particular vid is by Giacomo who goes by the name “skilman”.
He’s got a bunch of vids on the site and each one is worth watching.
His photography is first rate and his skills are amazing. Have a
look, you won’t be disappointed.

Ski