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Making chain bracelet pattern


#1

I’ve been asked to make a bracelet for a friend (his birthday is
next Sunday and he imagines I can have this done for him by then.
Ha!) Anyway, here’s a picture of what he wants. Hopefully one of you
smart folks has a recipe for me.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1aa


#2

Jean Reist Stark Classical Loop-in-Loop Chains


#3

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1aa

I think it’s called a wheat chain. If maybe someone can suggest a
book, I’d appreciate it.


#4

I don’t know if this will be of any use or not but hopefully it
helps:


#5

Thank you everyone who replied both off and on-list. A few people
have suggested this is a loop-in-loop chain, but (if my terminology
is right,) that’s what I made him a couple years ago. Picture:
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1at

I’m still searching.


#6

Does anyone have pattern for the wheat chain?


#7
I think it's called a wheat chain. If maybe someone can suggest a
book, I'd appreciate it. 

It looks to me much more like a variation on the classic foxtail
structure. That is, “loop in loop”, made by making a whole bunch of
round rings, soldered closed before assembling into the chain, in
your choice of wire (in this case, flat strip), then mostly
flattening them to long thin ovals, folding the first in the middle,
and from there, inserting a link into the two loops formed, folding
that link, and repeating. With most, it’s straightforward, being
round wire. With this pattern, you’ll have to pay close attention to
how the flat wire nests into the prior and succedding links in order
to get a uniform pattern.

The middle photo in the second row in this page shows a bracelet
made with this structure in a very open, easy to see how it’s made,
version.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1ax

The main difference with the flat strip wire is that both where the
link is compressed going though the prior link, at at it’s opened /
folded up ends, the wires need to be staggered, first one, then the
other, rather than side by side as is common with round wire. I
suspect that when you compact this chain after weaving (weave the
chain then gently mallet it, or draw through a wood drawplate, to
compress to a uniform tight structure) it will tend to do this
automatically, but you’ll want to check and make sure everything is
falling into the right places.

Peter


#8

Jean Reist Stark’s book “Classical Loop in Loop Chains” is the best
book on this subject in my opinion. I too was looking for
instructions on a specific chain and couldn’t find it anywhere free
on the internet. Ended up buying the book. Glad I did.

Jamie


#9

I may be way off base with this, but I showed the picture to a
friend and he suggested that it is a loop-in-loop chain that has been
put through the rolling mill to flatten it a bit. Not sure if his
analysis is correct, but thought I would pass it along.,

Alma


#10
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1at 

Try foxtail or wheat chain.


#11

Thanks, Alma.

I may be way off base with this, but I showed the picture to a
friend and he suggested that it is a loop-in-loop chain that has
been put through the rolling mill to flatten it a bit. 

Others have suggested its a one-way double loop-in-loop. I assure you
all it is not. I’ve cut the bracelet in half (with a saw) and had to
remove the remnants of 4 separate links (long flat jump rings). I’ve
also added some pictures to that webpage of a loop-in-loop I made
previously for the same guy.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1aa


#12

I think Peter is right on the money with this one. Having looked at
wheat chains, where there are twisted oval links interwoven into
plain oval links, and having made the classical loop in loop chains
as per Jean Reist Stark’s book, this definitely looks like the
classical loop in loop or foxtail chain but made with flat strip
instead of round wire.

The issue, as Peter said, is that the “ends” of the closed links
will not lie next to each other as they do when made with round
wire. So they have to be slightly offset so that one “end” sort of
nestles into the other “end”.

It doesn’t appear to be anything more complicated than a loop in
loop - the only complication being the flat strip vs round wire.

Helen
UK


#13

Well, Paf, I haven’t looked at this much because I don’t know a lot
about chain making. I looked at the link just now and I can offer
some tidbit, I guess. That is, indeed, a rather crude example of
"wheat". I don’t know how to make it, though.


#14

If anyone is looking for a chain pattern these guys have a pretty
extensive library and some good tutorials:

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1bm


#15

Did anyone in the group have directions for the wheat chain? If so I
would also appreciate the directions

O M


#16
Did anyone in the group have directions for the wheat chain? If so
I would also appreciate the directions 

I have had few private emails on this subject, and it came out that
another name for this pattern is Russian Weave. I inquired some
russian goldsmiths if they knew what is it. None have had a direct
experience with it, but consensus was that it is not a chain in =
traditional sense, but a variation of a technique known as “Viking
Knit”, but in this case it is done with loops instead of continues
wire.

Just to take a stub in the dark. It probably starts as regular four
or five loop base and chain is built by successively engaging
neighboring loops. I also have a strong suspicion that the third
loop would engage the second and the base loop, and the fourth would
engage the third and the second, and so on. Anyway, few experimental
runs should reveal the mystery.

Leonid Surpin
studioarete.com


#17

Not sure what pattern you are talking about but check out “Classical
Loop-in-Loop Chains & their Derivatives” by Jean Reist Stark &
Josephine Reist Smith. Excellent book with wonderful illustrations.

Diana Keenan


#18

Did not think the Wheat pattern was in the Stark book, but dug it
(the Stark Book) out anyway, and the wheat pattern is not in the
book. Any other suggestions?


#19

i am not an expert in any jewelry matter, certainly not chain. but
to me your bracelet looks like it was braided. i know you said that
you cut the sample and found 4 loops, but maybe you should research
braiding. i have seen a few braiding books in the crafts section of
bookstores. why don’t you check the libraries and the stores and see
what you can see?

jean adkins


#20

Have you tried the international organization that collects and
creates chain maille patterns? A great resource. If you don’t find
what you’re looking for in the “Library” and “Weaves”, consult them
through their membership blogs. Go to
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/cv