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Making a Russian Wedding Ring


#1

Hello all,

I’m a complete newbie to jewellery making but have been fascinated
by the idea for years (thank the local craft fair for that).

Having just quit my job I’m looking at all my opportunities and this
is one of them.

I have starter books and am reading before I even start to practise.

I am really wanting to know one particular (and probably difficult)
thing - how to make a russian wedding ring. My partner and I both
love them and both want to use them when we get married. Can someone
please let me know how to do this or point to a book or resource that
tells me?

I would be eternally grateful.
Thanks in advance.
Meg


#2
Can someone please let me know how to do this or point to a book or
resource that tells me?

Hello Meg,

Have a look at THE RINGS BOOK by Jinks McGrath, pages 43-44 (A&C
Black Pub., 2002). Since you’re starting out you’ll likely find the
rest of the book quite useful too.

The Rings Book
By Jinks McGrath

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0713653930.htm
Price: $28.90

Media: Paperback
Release data: 31 July, 2002

Cheers,
Trevor F.
in The City of Light
www.touchmetal.com


#3
how to make a russian wedding ring. My partner and I both love
them and both want to use them when we get married. Can someone
please let me know how to do this or point to a book or resource
that tells me? 

They are really quite simple to make. Cut and form 3 rings the same
size. Solder the first one shut. Pass the second through the first
and solder that one shut (like a chain). Pass the third ring through
both soldered rings and solder that one shut. Donna

SilverSorceress Designs
Unique, handcrafted Silver and Gemstone Jewelry
http://www.silversorceress.com/


#4
Have a look at THE RINGS BOOK by Jinks McGrath, pages 43-44 (A&C
Black Pub., 2002). Since you're starting out you'll likely find
the rest of the book quite useful too. 

The Rings Book
By Jinks McGrath

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0713653930.htm
Price: $28.90

Media: Paperback
Release data: 31 July, 2002

HA!! I JUST bought that very book and really like it. But then, I
think Jinks McGrath’s books are very detailed and easy to understand
with pictures alongside the instructions. Hats off to you, Jinks!

Polly Spencer
Mary Amalia Jewelry
Portland, Me.


#5
They are really quite simple to make. 

Hi Donna;

Yes, simple to make, but to get the size right is a bit more
problematic. And I’m afraid I don’t have a formula. What am I saying?
Well, suppose you want a size 6 ring. Make three rings, each a size
6, and assemble them as you say, but you certainly won’t have a ring
that fits like a size 6 when you’re done, more like a 4.5. And the
ratio of individual ring size to final size will vary depending on
thickness and width.

So how about Orchidians? Anybody have some input on this. I’ve got
one of those to size right now and the best I can do is use diffent
parts of my various fingers for a mandrel, find a place that fits,
mark my finger with an ink pen, and then measure that part of my
finger with ring sizes, then add or subtract accordingly. As for
making one up, I’d have to use trial and error.

David L. Huffman


#6
Yes, simple to make, but to get the size right is a bit more
problematic. And I'm afraid I don't have a formula. 

FWIW, Jinks McGrath (The Rings Book, P. 43) has the following to say
on the subject (she’s assuming D-section wire 2mm high by 4mm wide):

  "The sample measurements are for finger size'O' [slightly less
  than American size 7.5], but they can be applied in exactly the
  same way for other sizes. The length for O is 58mm and 4mm is
  added to this length to allow for the height (2mm) of the D
  section which makes the length approx. 62mm. 

  "A further 2mm plus 2mm is added to allow for the thickness of
  the two other rings which is 66mm. This means the length of
  each ring is 66mm." 

Cheers,
Trevor F.
in The City of Light
www.touchmetal.com


#7

Hi David,

Yes, simple to make, but to get the size right is a bit more
problematic. And I'm afraid I don't have a formula. What am I
saying? Well, suppose you want a size 6 ring. Make three rings,
each a size 6, and assemble them as you say, but you certainly
won't have a ring that fits like a size 6 when you're done, more
like a 4.5. And the ratio of individual ring size to final size
will vary depending on thickness and width. 

Yes, that is a problem that I haven’t solved yet either. I made a
set of Russian wedding rings for a couple recently and I told them
they would probably have to be sized after I made them because I
couldn’t guarantee they’d be the right size without a little trial
and error. As is was, they fit correctly without sizing, but that was
just dumb luck on my part! And I found that they didn’t shrink a size
and a half - closer to a size, but I, too, would like some formula.
Hope someone can help. Donna

SilverSorceress Designs
Unique, handcrafted Silver and Gemstone Jewelry
http://www.silversorceress.com/

Visit my studio/gallery in Bangor, Maine
19 Bomarc Rd.
Bangor, ME 04401
207-947-6200


#8

Hi there, to make a Russian wedding band you want to start out with
three rings 1.5 sizes bigger than you want the ring to be. Make each
ring separately, solder, and shape, then cut two open, thread the
fist thru, solder shut, then do the same with the next. You’ll have
to fiddle a bit with the placing of the rings when threading thru, to
get the right pattern. The reason you want to do it this way, is to
keep the work hardness of the made rings as much as possible, so
they’ll keep their shapes. Smaller ring thickness and diameters work
better.

STAY HUMAN
Namaste, Ande
Andes Cruz Designs


#9

I have found that for 10 ga. half-round wire, making the individual
rings 2 sizes larger than the desired end size works perfectly. I
believe that the difference depends both on the size of the stock
and the number of rings used, so I doubt that 2 sizes would work for
all examples.

The Russian wedding ring is the first project I teach my beginning
jewelry students, so I’ve seen easily a couple of hundred of them
over the years, and 2 sizes larger for 10 ga. half round has been
very consistent.

I generally have them make all 3 rings separately, solder them
closed, size them to be round and the same size (these ARE
beginners!), then cut through the 2 least-perfect seams, weave the
first through the intact ring, solder it, then weave the second ring
through both of the others and solder. The trick is to do the
re-soldering without changing the round shapes, or flowing the
solder to attach all 3 rings together; a bit of careful placement
before soldering helps with that.

At the end of their second 2-hour class, they all have a very cool
ring they can show off! Plus they’ve soldered 5 times, which makes
them more confident.

It’s a fun project and I love the look. Plus it’s great to fidget
with!

-Amanda Fisher


#10

Check out a good beginners book called “Two books in One Jewelry” by
Madeline Coles. That book has step by step instructions on how to
fabricate a Russian wedding band. The project is on page 20. A few
good libraries local to me carry this book.

As for how to size the rings, the above book says “To allow the
rings to interlock, they need to be three sizes larger than the
finger size.”

Jewelry Two Books In One: Projects To Practice & Inspire *
Techniques to Adapt to Suit Your Own Designs

By Madeline Coles

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0806948221.htm
Price: $16.47

Media: Spiral-bound
Manufacturer: Sterling
Release data: 28 June, 1999

Jim