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Magnetic Tumbler


#1

I am getting close to buying a magnetic tumbler, I just have to
convince myself its worth the money. The thread on this has been
interesting. I don’t think I would attempt to build one, I would
rather just buy it and plug it in. The particular one I am
looking at is the SS magnetic tumbler/polisher from Gesswein, it
runs about $3900.00. Has anyone used this particular unit? I have
had no luck finding independant sources of I would
appreciate any input.

Mark P.


#2

Mark, A friend of mine uses this tumbler and the results are
great! I spoke to a Gesswein salesman at one time about
purchasing one and he said they sell the demo models at a
discount rate $400/$500 off. You might want to ask.

Frank


#3

friend of mine is in the market for one of those…believe he
was dealing with swest…someone (reliable) told him to hold off
till the end of the year as prices will come down
considerably…i know this is third hand but am
passing it on anyway…good luck

DMorton@aol.com


#4

Mark:

I love gadgets as much as the next guy, but you could get 3
vibros that would flow thru and polish 100 rings in a day and a
half for about $2000 or less. To really “need” the magnetic, I’d
say you’d have to be doing more than that. Am I off here, or is
this an expensive toy?


#5
 Mark: I love gadgets as much as the next guy, but you could
get 3 vibros that would flow thru and polish 100 rings in a day
and a half for about $2000 or less. To really "need" the
magnetic, I'd say you'd have to be doing more than that.  Am I
off here, or is this an expensive toy? 

I just don’t have time to wait, we will cast about 12 custom
items a day, many need to be delivered that day. It is really
expensive, that is true. I do have a flow thru system and it
takes soo long that I just hand out the peices to be finished by
hand. I am leaning toward buying it because I would not be paying
people to do some of this work. In time it would pay for itself.
There are some things, like perfectly fitted wedding bands that
are tough to finish w/o affecting the fit, this would solve that
problem. And, all right, all
right…
… … MY NAME IS MARK PARKINSON AND I AM A
GADGET-AHOLIC.


#6

Mark,

Just started ‘tumbling’ … the SILVER items are polishe, but
show micro dents in all pieces to include those with polished
surfaces!!!

Should I … add more solution, less shot(steel), reduce the
time(24 hours), ANY THOUGHTS WOULD BE VERY MUCH APPRECIATED…
RIGHT NOW , I SEE NO REASON TO TUMBLE ??? EXCEPT FOR
PEICES WITH LITTLE OR NO POLISHED SURFACES…

THANKS,

JIM


#7

I have never tumbled my silver pieces that long. . . I use Rio
Grande Super Shine Descaler (sp?) and rarely tumble for more
than an hour to 90 minutes. No dents, although not all areas are
super shiny . . . but with a quick buff (bobbing compound, and
follow up with Zam) brings up a beautiful finish.


#8

Thanks for the Are u using a shot or ceramic or
both as | was advised??? I find that the shot doesn’t get into
the tiny crevious… thinking of cutting up stainless wire and
adding it??? Openion??

I guess that tumbling doesn’t do the entire job!!!.. have to do
a little polishing on the ‘wheel’. Didn’t understand that…

Jim


#9

I use STAINLESS STEEL shot . . . it comes in a mix of three
sizes/shapes. Cones, balls and something that looks like a flying
saucer. The least expensive shot that I’ve found (and it’s the
GOOD stainless steel stuff) is in the Thunderbird supply tool
catalog (back pages list new items . . . that’s where it is!)

I don’t know whether stainless wire would work! Some stainless
does rust! You’d have to get the real good kind.

Try the “razor edge” to get into the narrow spots. OR use your
Fordom tool (Drumel in my case) to reach those hard to reach
spots. You may or may not be able to get rid of all of the
"white stuff." I’ve found that using liver of sulfer (working in
Sterling) usually enhances my designs anyway. Great for covering
up those little “oops” spots. : )


#10

Those hard to get spots between stones etc, can be polished by
hand burnishing. Keep an even pressure on the burnisher and use
lubrication. The motion is a lot like “hatching” with a pencil.

Marilyn Smith


#11

Try the “razor edge” to get into the narrow spots. OR use your
Fordom tool (Drumel in my case) to reach those hard to reach
spots. You may or may not be able to get rid of all of the
"white stuff." I’ve found that using liver of sulfer (working in
Sterling) usually enhances my designs anyway. Great for covering
up those little “oops” spots. : )

Hi - you wrote about “liver of sulfer” - I get those “oops
spots” yoy write about with my dremel - yea - I’ve realised that
there are better alternatives but it is there. I work only i
Sterling so I tried to figure out what you ment with “liver of
sulfer” - living outside the english/american community I
sometimes find some expressions difficult to decypher - can you
please enlighten me? Best regards Lars Dahlberg


#12

Hi Lars, Lover of Sulfur is potassium sulfide. Some people refer
to it as “that stuff that smells like rotten eggs.”

Marilyn Smith