Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Magnetic Hematite Beads


#1

Hello Everybody

I am looking for Magnetic Hematite, sometimes called Magnetite,
beads. I need larger size square or rectangular beads for Men’s
bracelets. I currently make wrap around style ones for women, (see
pictures of similar at
http://www.magnetemporium.com/hematitebrnecklacepart2.htm ) but the
beads are too feminine for men. I need to buy them as temporary
strands or loose in packages and would need to buy quite a few them.
Thank you in advance.

Karen Bahr “the Rocklady” (@Rocklady) K.I.S. Creations
May your gems always sparkle.


#2

I don’t know where you can find magnetic beads, but I do have a
question for you. Can ordinary hematite beads be magnetized? I’ve
inadvertently magnetized my cutting shears, and every time I get
close to a pin or small metal object, it picks it up. So, can we take
ordinary hematite/hemalyke and magnetize it?

Betty


#3
So, can we take ordinary hematite/hemalyke and magnetize it? 

Um, Betty, what is hemalyke? Hematite is a natural stone, composed
of iron oxide. Is hemalyke an imitation of it? Or some odd marketing
term you’ve found? It’s not a name I’ve seen in any of the gemological
literature…

If it’s an imitation, then who knows if it’s magnetic. Depends on
what it is. If glass, then no. If pressed steel, (which can look
surprising like hematite once set in silver), then perhaps yes (not
all steel is magnetic)

As to hematite itself and magnetism, hematite is not magnetic, nor
is it attracted by a magnet. You cannot magnetize it like your
scissors. While it, like magnetite, is iron oxide, the formulas
aren’t the same. Magnetite is 46e3O4, while Hematite is Fe2O3.
Aside from magnetite, the only other mineral which is noticably
magnetic is pyrrhotite, FeS.

Peter


#4

Hello Betty I do not know. Maybe some of our more experienced
lapidarists could answer. Don, Gerry, etc.

I too would love to know. I will experiment with some of my plain
hematite beads.

Karen Bahr “the Rocklady” (@Rocklady)
K.I.S. Creations
May your gems always sparkle.


#5
Would anything here do? 

http://www.magsupply.com/TSdesigns.htm

Toodles! ~ Sherry ~
http://community.webshots.com/user/dancingfeatherz


#6

Karen, I have brought magnetic hematite beads , otherwise known as
hemalyke, locally. And most vendors won’t disclose where they get
their supply from , so I know my asking won’t get me anywhere.

Try http://www.allseason.com/bead/hem.htm … they list some round
beads only that are magnetic. www.ring-things.com
http://www.trashcity.com/magnetic.htm - they have quite a few
different sizes and shapes… and will probably be your best bet
for magnetic hematite beads. I also did a brief search on ebay and
found a vendor by the name of Kaleidoscope351 of Kaleidoscope
Crafts and Jewelry. Had a little bit of variety of magnetic beads.

Helen
where the monsoons have finally started here in Tucson


#7
While it, like magnetite, is iron oxide, the formulas aren't the
same.  Magnetite is 46e3O4, while Hematite is Fe2O3.   

Something here seems to have gotten corrupted in betwixt my sending
the message, and it’s inclusion in Orchid. What I sent stated the
formula for Magnetite as =46e3O4, with an F, not 46e3O4, with that
46. Odd…

Peter


#8

Karen, I know of a rather large deposit of magnetite. I am also a
lapidary and could cut some of this material for you, although it is
very very messy. How many beads do you need?

Best regards,
Rick Carew


#9

Betty, Hematite is one form of iron oxide, magnetite has two ions of
iron oxide in its molecular structure (Fe+2 & Fe+3) This means that
some of the iron ions have one less electron than the other and they
arrange themselves into a north-south polarity because of the
difference in charge between the ions. Hematite is non magnetic
because it has only one of these ions in its structure.

The ancient Chinese used to make compasses using the typical Chinese
soup spoon configuration and floating the magnetite spoon in
mercury. They were the first true inventors of the compass, although
they were not quite sure what to do with it. It remained merely a
curiosity for some centuries and passed away as so many things they
invented did.

Regards
Rick Carew


#10

Hello Peter Hemalyke is a synthetic material, but has the look and
feel of natural hematite. As stated in the Fire Mountain Catalogue.

Karen Bahr “the Rocklady” (@Rocklady)
K.I.S. Creations
May your gems always sparkle.


#11

Thank you Peter for the info on hematite. Hemalyke is the product
that Fire Mountain sells, and is an imitation of hematite. So with
the knowledge that you’ve given me, I now know that if a product is
advertised as magnetized hematite, it cannot be solid hematite.

Best regards,
Betty


#12

I’ve purchased magnetic hematite beads (probably hemalyke or
hematine, not real hematite, but who cares?) from Abeada, in Royal Oak
MI. They’re strictly wholesale-only to the trade w/business ID info.
They have some interesting beads, including a bunch of magnetic
hema-whatever in many different shapes They don’t have an online
catalog, but if you call the 800 number on the catalog request page,
they will rattle off what they have in stock. http://www.abeada.com/

–Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Pet Motif Jewelry
http://www.featheredgems.com


#13

Karen, Indeed, hemalyke is a synthetic hematite. It is hematite that
has been ground up and reconstituted with a binder…probably a
resin…and subjected to high pressure. In my opinion, it nearly
impossible to tell the difference, except I believe there is a slight
weight difference.

Others may correct me, but I do not believe hemalyke can be
magnitized. On the other hand, in nature, various forms of Hematite
can be mildly magnetic but it can be made strongly magnetic through a
heat treatment process. I have a couple of hundred hematite
necklaces of 6.5mm beads some of which are magnatized, some aren’t.

Cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio in SOFL where simple
elegance IS fine jewelry! @coralnut2


#14

I was looking for these once and found some when I searched “lodestone”.


#15

Hello! Just wanted to add that I had heard from a few gem sources
that where hematite is very fragile like glass and chips easily,
that some sources now use a reconstituted “stone” composite, made
from ground hematite and other glues or such - looks similar, may
have hematite particles in it, but is not a chunk of naturally
occurring stone. The names I’ve seen used for this type of product
are similar to hematite.

Sincerely,
Mary Beth in New England


#16

Hello Don

            Others may correct me, but I do not believe hemalyke
can be magnitized.  On the other hand, in nature, various forms of
Hematite can be mildly magnetic but it can be made strongly
magnetic through a heat treatment process.  

Do you know how that heat treatment is done? Is it something we can
do at home?

Karen Bahr “the Rocklady” (@Rocklady)
K.I.S. Creations
May your gems always sparkle.


#17

Hello Peter

Here is a more l write-up about Hematite and simulants.
A short story about simulated Hematite

Nearly ALL commercially available “hematite” beads are a simulated
material virtually identical to real hematite. The simulated
material is much easier to produce in detailed shapes, and looks and
feels like the real material. “Hematine” and “Hemalike” are names
you may see used for this product. If you look closely at the hole in
a molded bead of simulated hematite you will often see a smoothly
curved hole rather than the slightly chipped and sharply defined edge
of a true drill hole. The holes are usually molded into the simulated
product. Both genuine and simulated Hematite are Iron Oxide. True
hematite leaves a red streak when scratched across a piece of
unglazed porcelain. The simulated products usually leave a gray
streak. Simon & Schuster’s Guide to Gems and Precious Stones says
"Despite its modest value, it has been imitated by a ferromagnetic,
sintered product, molded to look like engraved stones." The bottom
line: Even though a few vendors still say their hematite style beads
are a natural material, we believe most mass produced hematite beads
are the simulated product. The simulated material and the genuine are
so similar in look and feel that vendors may not question their
suppliers and may inadvertently mislead the customer.

Karen Bahr “the Rocklady” (@Rocklady)
K.I.S. Creations
May your gems always sparkle.


#18

Karen,

Not completely clear but as I understand it, hematite can be made
strongly magnetic by placing it on charcoal and slowly heating with a
reducing flame. I don’t understand exactly how or why this works but
saw a reference to the process some time back. Haven’t tried it
however.

Cheers, Don.