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[Looking4] Oven or kiln for enameling


#1

Greetings Everyone!

I’m currently looking to buy an oven especially for production
enameling, but I need some help before I make a desicion. First off,
is it better to buy one that is new, or have any of you users had
luck and no problems with buying a used oven? And secondly, what
exactly is the difference between oven and kiln? Do they both give
the same results when it comes to enameling? And finally, If anyone
is interested in selling theirs, (I’m in the southwest region, El
Paso, TX) please inbox me and send me photos!

I look forward to your reply, thanks in advance!

best wishes,
Akiceri


#2

Since you appear to be starting from the beginning in enamelling, you
need to make a list of the following. IE write a proper
specification.

what metal or metals do you plan to enamel upon/?

what enamel makers products do you plan to use?

then what temperature range do you plan to work in ?

what is the largest size you envisage enamelling?

do youhave the power to run a kiln to meet the above specifications?

For example, my enamelling kiln I bought new had an internal working
size of 12 in by 12 in by 4 in high.

It used 3kw of power at 240 volts, (here in the uk) it would run
upto 1000deg C. With a proper platinum iridium thermocouple
pyrometer.

the same load in the us at110 v would be 6kw. thermostat controlled
temperature.

Had a front opening door full size with a small door in the main
door, plus peep hole Its not funny opening a kiln at 1000 dg C. to
load and unload work.

Trying to do proper production work with amateur kit will frustrate
you.

Enamelling needs an oxidising atmosphere.

To get saleable results you need to have the best enamels, metalwork
and kiln.

Solid colours as in opaque is easy on a flat surface. Transparent in
the round? is a whole lot more difficult.

you can do simple pendants in copper single sided enameled with a
1in dia propane torch, running from a 40 lb propane tank and
regulator.

You will need a proper kiln to match Faberge’s enamelled easter
eggs.

at least enamelling is quick, as in minuites not like pottery
firing, which can take days.

An oven is really what you bake bread or cakes in, ie up to say 350
deg C. Not really enamelling temperature.

Its a hard road, enamelling. I couldnt make a proper living from it,
tho had lots of fun. Never could get a true ruby red transparent on
silver. On gold, yes!.

still have all the kit and enamels.


#3

Akiceri, A kiln (or an oven) is simply an insulated box with coiled
nichrome wire to heat it. Everything else is for convenience or
efficiency.

So, a very used /abused kiln may have a shorter life expectancy. My
old Cress kiln was second hand and worked well for many years. It’s
retired now.

Re-wiring on some models is very easy and not too expensive. Kiln is
the proper term, “oven”, not so much. If you’re doing production
work, a pyrometer to measure and set temperature and a timer would be
very useful for keeping your product consistent.

It sounds like you are somewhat new to enameling? An inexpensive
kiln ( used) might be a good idea until you’ve worked out the bugs on
what works for your concept. You’ll need to figure out how many
pieces you want to fire at once. Whether they they are tall or flat
can affect your decision on chamber size.

The Enamelist Society is holding it’s conference and workshops this
August.

Aside from all the opportunities to learn, we usually have some used
kilns for the silent auction and sometimes new ones for the live
auction. It’s also a chance to talk kilns with a lot of professionals
and teachers. You might find valuable info on our website, too.

I think you’ll also find that kiln companies are very willing to
talk with you to explain their various products and how they may fit
your needs.

Good luck! Marianne
Marianne Hunter
hunter-studios.com


#4

Purchased my Paragon SC2 used on Craig’s List & have used it with no
problems for 3 years. Buyer Beware, Craig’s List is a minefield, but
if you can find one that suits your needs, and test it, I’d say go
for it. Use the savings for precious metals; they’re relatively
"cheap" now.


#5

Hi

I don’t know if this oven would work for you and it is heavy and
located in San Gabriel, CA near Los Angeles.

You can see it @ David Gellers website under things for sale.

Charles Martin