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Looking for higher power flexshaft


#1

Does anyone have any suggestions for higher power flexshafts? This
evening I had flames shoot out of a Foredom TX motor for the second
time. I’ve also blown up three foot pedals. Between talking to
Foredom and the two motors I’ve burned up, it is clear that the work
I am doing is too much for them. I need something a bit more heavy
duty for the non jewelry work I am doing.

Variable speed is a must. The 15000 RPM of the TX is plenty. I am
primarily running surface conditioning disks, large carbide burs and
3" buffing wheels.

Thanks,
Jason


#2

Jason sounds like you are doing some very heavy work. Have you
thought about switching to air powered tools? No neat so no burn
out. Got to keep lubed. Other then that will run for years. used
them when I was a jet mechanic…


#3
Variable speed is a must. The 15000 RPM of the TX is plenty. I am
primarily running surface conditioning disks, large carbide burs
and 3" buffing wheels. 

you might want to consider an air die grinder type of handpiece.
Runs off a compressor not a motor. Depending on type, capable of high
speeds, high torque, etc. And, especially if you already have a
compressor, they’re not really all that costly…


#4

Jason-I would recommend that you not use 3" buffs, heavy carbide
burs, and larger finishing discs on a flex shaft. That sort of
finishing work should be done with a polishing lathe.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#5

I’ve tried using an air powered die grinder and I didn’t really like
it.

The power level was really nice, but there didn’t seem to be a good
way to adjust the speed on the fly. The tool itself was cheap, but it
also takes a HUGE compressor to keep up with the air consumption.

I also have a couple of polishing lathes. I use them when I can, but
for a good chunk of the work I do, a flex shaft is either required or
makes the job far easier.


#6

A good flex shaft will last years if used correctly. I bought my
first one forty years ago and it still works. I did add another one
to it about a year ago. The need that you describe would be better
served with a polishing motor, and proper polishing wheels. Used
correctly, they will also last many years. You can vary the speed of
a polishing motor with different sized wheels. I start with a six
inch wheel and, as they wear, save them. Regardless of how you
polish, you need to make sure that you collect the debris in some
way and protect yourself with a mask and eye protection. A good
polishing motor cost about the same as a new good flex shaft. Just
some thoughts. Rob

Rob Meixner


#7
I also have a couple of polishing lathes. 

There are ways to adapt a flexible shaft to a polishing motor, but I
don’t know whether you can get the variable speed you need.

Al Balmer