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Lime Sulphur Production


#1

I am currently producing my own lime sulphur for use on peach trees.
I am doing it in bulk for I’m farming with peaches and the prices of
this product in South Africa is unaffordable. My problem is that I
don’t have a detailed recipe and am struggling to get the sulphur to
desolve. Is there something I can add or do to solve this? Can you
help me with the recipe for lime sulphur?

It will be greatly appreciated!!
Talita


#2

Here is a “recipe” I found and posted on Orchid before:
You can change the amounts in proportion to you batch size.
If you need help ask me… This is from an agricultural source.
jesse

A combination of hydrate lime (CaO) mixed with sulfur. Lime sulfur
is extremely water soluble, but incompatible with other pesticides
due to it’s alkaline reaction when diluted with water. It should be
used by itself.

Lime sulfur can be made by combining 20 pounds of rock lime and 15
pounds of flowers of sulfur with 50 gallons of water. Place in a
large iron kettle or boiler outside (this stuff smells!) and boil for
one hour. Allow to cool and settle. The clear, amber fluid
remaining after filtering is lime sulfur. It’s probably cheaper and
easier to purchase a prepared product. This stuff is a pretty
plant fungicide .

My comments; The “recipe” may be a little confusing … I take rock
lime to be calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) Kilned lime or burnt lime
will be calcium oxide ( CaO ) which becomes slaked lime - calcium
hydroxide - hydrated lime (CaOH) when mixed with water. I don’t see
any “magic” in the chemistry although I would be most likely use a
burnt or kilned lime which is more alkaline. All components
available either at a garden supply or in the concrete materials
area for the hydrated lime. A 50 # sack is about $4.50. Excesses
can go thinly on the lawn or garden especially east of the
Missisippi river in the US. DO NOT ACIDIFY as this makes hydrogen
sulfide (H2S) Rotten egg smell. This is a toxic gas.

Like everything be careful. And the Recipe is scalable - a batch
doesn’t have to be that big!

Jesse


#3

I purchased a small bottle of lime sulfur from a garden store years
ago for under $10 and the stuff has lasted forever. I dilute it down
with some water and it works every bit as well as liver of sulfur, it
just stinks, use it outside or your spouse may not be to happy with
you.

LOL
Tom


#4

Recently I have been battling ringworm in my two cats. My vet sold
me a bottle of Lime Sulphur to dip them in once a week. She warned me
about it turning my silver jewelry black.

I purposely didn’t remove my silver ring and Wow, what an easy and
nice reaction it had! If very diluted, and stopped by rinsing, the
color is the same beautiful purplish/brownish you get with very light
LOS. Of course the heavier is the standard black. This was done with
just barely warm water in the dilution. Not sure how long it will
stay potent, but is sure alot easier to use than the usual LOS which
always goes bad on me after it is stored awhile, even with all the
precautions.

Not sure where else to buy, and not interested in making in large
quantities. It is labeledd LymDyp from a vet supply company called
DVM.

Diana Alexander


#5

Not sure where else to buy, and not interested in making in large
quantities. It is labeledd LymDyp from a vet supply company called
DVM.

Go to a garden supply store and you will find it. The bottle I have
was produced by Ortho and I still have the price sticker on it for
$7.99.

Tom


#6

Continue from:
https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/lime-sulphur-production

Hello Orchidians,

Diana Alexander wrote about a cat dip for ringworm that contained
lime sulpher and caused silver to tarnish. FYI, there are some
dandriff shampoos that contain sulpher compounds. Their use will
also tarnish silver. I suspect some customer complaints about
silver tarnishing are related to the customer’s use of dandriff
shampoo! There can be just enough residual left on the neck and
ears to darken silver jewelry.

Judy in Kansas


#7
I suspect some customer complaints about silver tarnishing are
related to the customer's use of dandriff shampoo! There can be
just enough residual left on the neck and ears to darken silver
jewelry. 

This is a really great observation! I had a customer whose necklace
kept darkening, no matter what I did. One more thing to check–
Thanks!

–Noel


#8

Another thing to check is if your client uses some sort of facial
scrub for a skin condition - some of them contain sulfur. It has
done an amazing job of oxidizing a gold ring over time.


#9
    This is a really great observation! I had a customer whose
necklace kept darkening, no matter what I did.

Sometimes it’s the person’s skin – because of diet. Of course that
smacks of blaming the customer, and no one wants to do that.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#10
    Sometimes it's the person's skin -- because of diet. Of course
that smacks of blaming the customer, and no one wants to do that. 

Sometimes the truth hurts. I’m a high-sulphur person. I like foods
rich in garlic, onions, and the like, and various peppers are second
nature to me. I just have to make a point of giving my jewelry a
wipedown with a polishing cloth, as needed, and the drawers they are
kept in are lined with silver cloth.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL
@Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org