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LED for jewelry


#1

Hi all; I am interested in constructing several pieces which can be
internally lit using a LED… It seems to be a fairly simple
electronic set up using a LED, a resistor, a watch battery and an
off/on switch. Does any one know if there is a source for this ready
made or must I build it? Any info pointing me in the right direction
would be appreciated.

Dave Owen


#2
I am interested in constructing several pieces which can be
internally lit using a LED.. It seems to be a fairly simple
electronic set up using a LED, a resistor, a watch battery and an
off/on switch. Does any one know if there is a source for this
ready made or must I build it? 

You might try Edmund Scientific for components, or X-Treme Geek for
finished examples like the Flipo Fuze quartz necklace.

Lorraine


#3

Hi Dave: I’m trying to figure out how to do this as well. I found
this neat firefly pendant & you can take a look at the video on
constructing it. Looks like you can get the supplies at Radio Shack.
I’ve also thought about buying ready made Halloween jewelry w/ leds
& switches (really cheap at “5 Below”) & just taking it apart to
incorporate the parts I need. – Trish


#4

Dave,

I think my first approach would be to head for the local Dollar ( or
Pound ) store and buy one or two of the many toys /novelties/ badges
there that use this technology. Then I’d tear them apart and see how
well I could adapt them into my design. This would probably be
cheaper than buying the parts separately…

Best wishes,
Ian
Ian W. Wright
Sheffield UK


#5

Checkout coolight, they offer electroluminescent wires:
http://www.coolight.com


#6

I can’t help with parts sources, but there was a necklace on the
market about 3 years ago that used this technology. The battery was
housed in one half of a clasp (magnetic, I think), and it appeared
that the maker used regular nylon coated beading wire as the lead.
The LED was in the center hole of a large Swarovski crystal cube
bead, and the bead glowed when the clasp was hooked together,
closing the circuit. When it was unclasped, the LED went off. A
friend was selling these for a while, so I got to play with one until
I figured it out.

Kathy Johnson
Feathered Gems Jewelry
http://www.fgemz.com


#7

Hi Dave,

This is what my husband (Master Electrician) had to say when I asked
him your question:

The LED voltage drop is about 1/2 volt per LED. Practical
applications would be for broaches or pendents. The typical circuit
current would be 10 to 20 Milliamps depending on how bright the
intended LEDs are to be. I would suggest using several LEDs in series
so their combined voltage drop is slightly less than the battery
voltage. I suggest you do not use a voltage dropping resistor in
series as this wastes your available battery life. The LEDs are a DC
device so for your tests, make sure you have all LEDs connected
properly for polarity or your circuit will not operate. Switches for
low voltage applications fail to operate properly when they get even
slightly dirty. I would suggest using a sealed, miniature magnetic
reed switch. This is impervious to dirt and moisture and will close
or open with a small magnet which could be part 2 of your artwork.
When it is removed, from back or front, the circuit will shut off for
storage.

Finally, do use a voltage dropping resistor and a Milliammeter to
check current. Test different combinations of LEDs until the right
amount and type of LEDs are found so a series resistor is not
required while not exceeding the current specifications of the LEDs.
If you do exceed the current spec. you will burn out at least one LED
and damage some of the others in the circuit.

Karen Bahr - Karen’s Artworx
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
http://karensartworx.ganoksin.com/blogs/