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Last word on Gesswein Colorit enameling unit


#1

Main Entry: 1enam=B7el
from websters dictionary…

Pronunciation: i-'na-m&l
Function: transitive verb

Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French enamailler, from en- + esmai=
l
enamel, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German smelzan to melt
1 : to cover, inlay, or decorate with enamel
2 : to beautify with a colorful surface
3 : to form a glossy surface on (as paper, leather, or cloth)

from dictionary.com
e=B7nam=B7el (-nml)
n.
1 A vitreous, usually opaque, protective or decorative coating baked on=

metal, glass, or ceramic ware.
2 An object having such a coating, as in a piece of cloisonn=E9.
3 A coating that dries to a hard glossy finish: nail enamel.
4 A paint that dries to a hard glossy finish.
5 Anatomy. The hard, calcareous substance covering the exposed portion of=
a
tooth.

tr.v. e=B7nam=B7eled, or e=B7nam=B7elled e=B7nam=B7el=B7ing, or e=B7nam=B7=
el=B7ling e=B7nam=B7els or
e=B7nam=B7els
1 To coat, inlay, or decorate with enamel.
2 To give a glossy or brilliant surface to.
3 To adorn with a brightly colored surface.


#2

I`m not sure a few of you completely understood the post of the
dictionary definitions of the word enamel . Yes vitreous enamelling
is an extremely fine art and some of the work done by the
enamelists who regularly comtribute to this forum is very beautiful.
BUT nowhere in any dictionary, either book or internet version does
it say that enamel is glass. Yes we have come to know it as glass.
It seems the dictionarys definition of enamel refers to the process
of application , layering or inlay. In my opinion someone has been
unfairly accused of making a false statement. If someone can find an
alternative dictionary definition I would love to hear it . If
Gesswein had used the word vitreous then there might have been some
reason to point fingers.

vit=B7re=B7ous   Pronunciation Key  (vtr-s)
adj.
Of, relating to, resembling, or having the nature of glass; glassy.
Obtained or made from glass.
Of or relating to the vitreous humor.
n.
[From Latin vitreus, from vitrum, glass.]