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Lapidary Equipment Care


#1

All, One problem I have always ran into on lapidary equipment is tear
down to replace parts. I have been experimenting with ways to make
shaft spacers, bearings, screws, pulleys, etc easier to remove.
Today I had to tear down my 4 station grinder for maintenance. The
machine was last tore down 18 months ago. Everything went very
smooth. Before I reassembled the machine 18 months ago I had applied
a layer of wheel bearing grease on the shaft and inside all the screw
holes. This tear down was the easiest I have ever done. In less than
one hour I was back in business. In the past I have tried silicon
oils that did not work near as well. I also put wheel bearing grease
on the outside of the sealed bearings. Hopefully to stop the water.

Gerry Galarneau


#2
All, One problem I have always ran into on lapidary equipment is
tear down to replace parts.  I have been experimenting with ways to
make shaft spacers, bearings, screws, pulleys, etc easier to remove 

The answer to this is at your local hardware store. It is called
Anti Seize compound. It comes in a small tube that will last you
forever. I can’t locate my tube just now to give the ingredients but
it is a silver colored past that is metallic looking. There is also a
copper colored past that is not as good. I have used it for years
now with never a failure. When I had my lapidary store, I always put
a coat on the spindle and nut of every saw I sold, because I knew the
new owner would likely forget and have troubles later. I have an old
Hyland Park 6" that was really rusty on the inside when I got it.
Once I got every thing off the saw, a single application of the anti
seize has lasted for about 8 years now and has outlasted several
blades. I only cut with water and sometimes forget to drain down the
sump after cutting and I am constantly destroying blades due to rust
on them. However I never have a problem in getting the nut loose or
the blade off. One point with the compound though, if you leave a
spot of it on your hand, it will be all over everything shortly. It
is difficult to clean up after so be careful when you apply in. As
the old ad said, “just a dab will do you”

Don


#3

Gerry have you ever tried a product called never seize? its a grease
based product that has copperdust in suspension to make all threads
stay free. my uncle a car mech. swears by this stuff and admittedly
I’ve seen ancient lug nuts spin off with ease. this was on a trailer
of his that had sat for about twenty years, it even had a fair sized
tree growing through the hitch brace that we had to cut down. ever
since then I’ve used this stuff on any threads exposed to weathering
or hostile conditions with excellent results. Talk to you later Dave Otto


#4

Don and Dave, I have tried several never seize compounds that work
well on threads, but did not work to stop bearings and spacers from
seizing on shafts. Bearings and spacers are constantly exposed to
misted water droplets that work their way into every opening
available. Have you tried this compound under bearings and spacers?

Gerry Galarneau


#5

Hello everyone,

I’m am currently testing a method to stop lapidary saw blades from
rusting when using water as a coolant.

I am using a Diamond Pacific Genie for this test. The saw blade has
been in the water for a week now, with out any sign of rust. Before I
started the test, it would rust in a day if I forgot to empty it.

I have attached sacrificial aluminum anode to the motor housing with
a piece of copper wire. The anode is resting on the bottom of the saw
tray.

I do not know if this type of protection has been used in lapidary
saws before or not. It is used for protecting water heaters and
underground pipe.

I used aluminum for the anode because I happened to have some scrap
1/4" sheet laying around my shop. Magnesium is another metal that is
commonly used as an anode in water heaters. Zinc is commonly used as an
anode in outboard motors.

The metal that is less noble (on the periodic table of elements) in
the circuit will be the one that is sacrificed.

Have I stumbled on to something that has been overlooked or am I just
reinventing the wheel?

Timothy A. Hansen

TAH Handcrafted Jewelry
web-site: www.tah-handcrafted-jewelry.com
e-mail: tim@tah-handcrafted-jewelry.com


#6
 Bearings and spacers are constantly exposed to >     misted water
droplets that work their way into every opening >     available.
Have you tried this compound under bearings and spacers? 

Gerry, I have and it is great. The brand I use is Dynatex
Anti-seize & Lubricating Compound, PN 49501. It comes in a 1oz tube.
I’ve still got around 9/10’s of an ounce left after four years. It
goes a long way. This is the aluminum colored compound. I like it
better than the copper compound as it seems to last longer.

When using a compound on bearings and spacers, make sure you have
cleaned most all the rust off the shaft and the inside of the
spacers and bearings. It will continue to grow if you don’t get
most all of it off. A quick trip to the wire brush usually works.
Then put a thin coat on both pieces, rubbing it in with your finger
to make sure you have a good coating, then assemble. Just remember
that the stuff migrates like crazy. If you don’t clean your hands
right after applying it, it will be all over everything within a
stones throw within minutes.

Don


#7
Have I stumbled on to something that has been overlooked or am I just
reinventing the wheel?

Timothy, I doubt that the aluminum is doing much for you if
anything. The sump in my saw is made of aluminum so that would
accomplish the same thing as your anode. My blades still rust if I
don’t drain down the sump after every use.

Don