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Lalique style work tutorial


#1

Greetings Metal Wizards: I’ve took one silversmith class and the
rest I try to fill in by Internet tutorials and crafts books. The
books and tutorials are usually very low level and the workmanship is
often “organic” or downright sloppy. Does anyone know of a Lalique
style tutorial on the Internet or in a book? Sally Parker


#2

Dear Sally

I suggest you do some research on Rene Lalique he was a one of a
kind genius. No one has every come close.

Perhaps you could look at Murrle Bennet or Rene Macintosh. The
original Art and Craft Movement has a lot to teach all of us.

Unless of course you are skilled enough to make your own own enamels
from scratch. And are a master sculptor.

Personally Lalique is the standard we should all aim for.

RIchard


#3
Those names are new to me. Personally I think that Lalique touched
some nerve and also had great PR. I think, myself, that Georges
Fouquet was both a better jeweler and finer craftsman, overall.
Check him out.... 

Dear Sally I suggest you do some research on Rene Lalique he was a
one of a kind genius. No one has every come close. Perhaps you could
look at Murrle Bennet or Rene Macintosh. The original Art and Craft
Movement has a lot to teach all of us. Unless of course you are
skilled enough to make your own own enamels from scratch. And are a
master sculptor. Personally Lalique is the standard we should all aim
for.

RIchard


#4
I suggest you do some research on Rene Lalique he was a one of a
kind genius. No one has every come close. Perhaps you could look
at Murrle Bennet or Rene Macintosh. The original Art and Craft
Movement has a lot to teach all of us.

Thanks, Richard. Do Murrie Bennet and Rene Macintosh publish
"How-to’s"?


#5

Just checked out Georges Fouquet truly amazing but he did not invent
his own enamels, a bit technical. Also he did not have the PR Sarah
Bernhardt as a customer nor a backer like the oil magnate “Mr
Millions”

Just another master to make me feel humbled and inspired.

Richard


#6

Not to be condescending, but you would profit greatly from courses
in the history of art and design. I’d start with visits to every art
or design museum in your area. Also there are Art History videos
available at Khan Academy which may be of interest.

Also this book, The Design History Reader, seems to be an
interesting compilation of design writing through the last couple of
centuries.

Designers don’t generally do how-to’s, as design is not the sort of
mechanical process that lends itself to step by step demonstration.
There are many books on the techniques of rendering jewelry, but
that is different than a how-to on design itself.

Occasionally a designer may publish a pattern book, Thomas
Chippendale’s The Gentleman & Cabinet-Maker’s Director comes
immediately to mind. And several 20th century designers have
published design manifestos, most notably Le Corbusier and
Buckminster Fuller. But the only jewelry designer I know of who has a
reproducible method of design, that is, one that can be taught as a
sort of step-by-step, is Omar Torres. While he was the head designer
at Bulgari he taught his method of designing via motifs to his
students at FIT. But as Maurice Galli, head designer at Harry Winston
and professor at FIT, says, “A designer thinks with his pencil.” Pick
up a pencil and draw, draw, draw.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh was an important architect and furniture
designer working in the Arts & Crafts style. Here’s the Wikipedia
entry:

Murrle Bennett & Co. was a 19-20th century firm whose designs seem
primarily to be in the Aesthetic style. At least, those of which one
can find photos on the Web.


#7

oops wikipedia no thanx Sorry for my misspelling of Rennie but he
was a quality jewellery designer as well.

The point is that one should look at every well designed piece, no
matter what and gain inspiration.

our aim is to enrapture our clients is it not?
richard


#8
Not to be condescending, but you would profit greatly from courses
in the history of art and design. I'd start with visits to every
art or design museum in your area. Also there are Art History
videos available at Khan Academy which may be of interest. 

Dear Elliot and others: I don’t regard anyone’s tutorial suggestions
as condescending. So far my jewelry education has been a course in
casting and course in fabrication. All other suggestions are
welcome. Sally