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Lacquer


#1

Hi, Orchid Mentors!

When I started out in metalworking, I thought I would progress from
copper/brass to silver. Well, now that I am doing more silver I find
there is a constant, although smaller, market for the copper/brass. So
since I am not going to drop this line, here’s my question…

I have been lacquering these pieces to protect the patina. I have tried a
liquid and a spray. Both are okay, but I think there is room for
improvement. Does anyone have a lacquer he/she is particularly satisfied
with?

Thanks,
Candy Glaze


#2

I have used PRO-CRAFT Lacquer (No. 45.650). It applies easily, dries
quickly, and seems durable. Rio Grande’s 'Clear Lacquer Tarnish Inhibitor’
may be the same product. (Pg. 205, 1997 tool catalog)


#3

Ok, I’ll let you in on a little secret. There’s a product out there we used
in the restoration of antique autos, for preserving the finish on polished
aluminum, plated parts, etc. It’s called Nyalic, you can get it in either
aerosol, or a quart can. It’s heat resistant, and it stands up well to
chipping cracking (when you apply it right) And it won’t yellow. If you
would like to try this stuff, you can get it through the Eastwood Company,
in Malvern, Pa. Call them up, all of you and requst a catalog :
1-800-345-1178. They also carry a whole line of metalworking / auto
restoration tools.

TimGoodwin
@tmn8tr


#4
I have been lacquering these pieces to protect the patina.  I have tried a
liquid and a spray.  Both are okay, but I think there is room for
improvement.  Does anyone have a lacquer he/she is particularly satisfied
with?

The strongest finish I have found is “Powder Coating” , this is not
something you would do yourself. Look up metal finishers in your area and
talk to one that does powder coating. This is a very tough finish it will
hold up to some hammering and bending, but you might be in trouble when a
piece does eventually chip. Ask the metal finisher if the coating can be
removed for repair work. I have only used it on sculpture.

For jewelry I use a low copper alloy brass - in the mid 50% range, it
doesn’t tarnish too fast. For the copper I usually heat patina to a dark
red, then there is no tarnish problem.

Doug Salmon


#5

Does anyone have a lacquer he/she is particularly satisfied with?

I would recommend the spray lacquer made by G.J. Nikolas & Co. It is
called “#2105 Clear Lacquer”. It costs about $40.00 for a case of ten cans.
Alot of production jewelers use this lacquer with good results. It is easy
to use, dries really quickly, does not yellow and does not have that
"plastic-ey" look that alot of lacquers seem to have.

G. J. Nikolas & Co.
2800 Washington Blvd.
Bellwood, Il 60104
1-708-544-0320

Kim
@Kim_Keyworth


#6

Candy, I use plasti-kote hi-performance classic fast dry lacquer. I get
it at Pep Boys auto supply store in a silver spray can. I’ve been using
it for years and it’s the best I’ve found. Just like the finish on a car.
Wendy Newman


#7

Have you tried Renassance (sp?) wax? It was referred to as
Museum Wax when I learned to work with metals. I recently asked
if anyone else had ever heard of this product, I’ve been told
that it can be found at fine woodworking suppliers.

When we used it in class, it covered brass, copper or
nickel-silver with a hard coating, helping these metals not to
discolor and patinas didn’t seem to wear off either.

Have fun!


#8

I have used lacquer # 2105 from G.W,.Nicklaus outside of Chicago. (I don’t
have their number here) This clear lacquer is non-yellowing, and produces
a beautiful finish on bronze or silver. They make many different products
for spraying, dipping, brushing, and are very helpful on the phone. They
also have sample sizes available. I only use lacquer on my small
sculptures that aren’t handled alot. I also use it for small bits of brass
in my silver jewelry. If used on the whole piece, it will eventually wear
off and the piece will look worse than if if was just tarnished.

I use Eastman color metal dyes, and various patinas and dyes from
Sculpt-Nouveau. I(on bronze) need to lacquer these pieces, but so far,
when I dip them, the colors are dissolved and run together, or over the
areas I wish to keep as bright bronze. Sculp N told me to spray first with
a urethane, and then dip in the lacquer, but the dipping still causes the
above disaster. These are on pieces that go outside. Someone suggested I
thin the lacquer with acetone instead of lacquer thinner. Would this make
a difference? Does anyone have a suggestion?

Ruth


#9

On 11-Apr-97, Foxymom123@aol.com wrote about Lacquer:

F> I use Eastman color metal dyes, and various patinas and
dyes from F> Sculpt-Nouveau. I(on bronze) need to lacquer
these pieces, Someone suggested I F> thin the lacquer with
acetone instead of lacquer thinner. Would thismake F> a
difference? Does anyone have a suggestion? ******************
G’day; I doubt that this would make a difference. I suggest you
could try first sealing with white shellac (shouldn’t produce
yellowing,) and then use your usual laquer. Shellac is alcohol
based, not acetone or petroleum solvents. Or you could try first
spraying with the fixative artists use for fixing pencil or
charcoal drawings, then when dry, use the laquer. But it is
essential that you get fun out of doing it. Cheers,

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)