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Korean black copper patina recipe


#1

Looking for help with a patina recipe that colors copper black, but
not silver. For a marriage of metals project. Have yet to find a
suitable one.


#2

Liver of sulphur!! Pure silver does not rally patinate, it is the
copper in sterling that “works”.

John Dach


#3

In his 1985 work “Patinas for Small Studios” Charles Lewton-Brain
gives a recipe for Korean Black-C.

I’d be happy to share it here but don’t want to infringe in any way
on Charles’ copyright.

Does anyone know if it is appropriate for me to post the recipe
here?

Elizabeth Johnson


#4
Liver of sulphur!! Pure silver does not rally patinate, it is the
copper in sterling that "works". 

Sure it does, silver sulphide is produced on the surface when fine
silver is treated with liver of sulfur. The reaction is slower but
it still happens.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#5
Liver of sulphur!! Pure silver does not rally patinate, it is the
copper in sterling that "works". 

Have you never oxidized fine silver?


#6

Check out these patina formulas:

Jamie


#7

I just ran test of our Antique Patina on fine silver bezel. This
solutions contains a little selenious acid. The silver must be very
clean and warming under hot water helps. Colors a nice charcoal grey
to black.

Bill


#8
Does anyone know if it is appropriate for me to post the recipe
here? 

As a general rule, recipes are not protected by copyright as long as
they are effectively just a list of ingredients and basic mixing
instructions (and maybe safety instructions) with no author artistic
"expression" in them. A whole book of recipes or a book that
includes many of them may or may not be actually protected by
copyright. Big publishers all add various front matter, transitions
between sections, etc., to at least make mere copying of a whole
recipe book a copyright violation however anyone is still free to
copy straightforward recital recipes just as they are to copy all the
listings in the phone book. Even if the recipe is the author’s own
creation the rule holds based on the fact that they have put the
recipe out there in a published book for the public to use (unless
the book is sold under some type of contract such as market
statistics books often are). If the author of the book did NOT
create the recipe and hasn’t revamped it with any of their own
artistic expression and it has no unlawfully copied artistic
expression then there is absolutely no doubt that it would fall into
the “sweat of the brow” rule (the book author merely assembling it
into their book) that would let anyone republish it.

That said, if I were to post my recipe for chili, its mixing
instructions do fall under copyright protection because they have
quite a bit of artistic expression in them as they take you through
the process with a variety of asides, expressive flourishes,
observations, etc., that have no necessary relationship to the mere
list of ingredients which would not be protected by copyright and
from which any reasonable cook could create the result without
reading the instructions.

And also, when posting a recipe, it would be fair and proper to cite
the source such that anyone that might want to get the whole book
would have sufficient to do so. The odds are that a good
technical recipe posted from a quality book are more likely to induce
additional sales than to reduce them.

I haven’t seen the specific recipe in question and IANAL so take the
above for what it’s worth.

James E. White
willitsell.com