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Knotting tool


#1

Just seeking opinions, from those of you who use this wooden-handled
knotting tool when stringing beads – it sells for about $40 – is it
really worth that much money? Or is it a case of a successful
patent? Thanks in advance, Judy Bjorkman


#2

Judy, The tool is great if you get the video or sombody to demonstrate
how to use it.My wife has reduced the time it takes to string a 18"
strand to around 25 minutes.

John


#3

Len and Judy, I bought one of the bead stringers several years ago.
Used it about 3 times and decided I could do just as well without it.
Haven’t used it since. It is a nice little tool for the
challanged…those who have limited strength or manual dexterity in
their fingers. Otherwise, you can knot just as fast and evenly
without it.

Cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio in SOFL where simple
elegance IS fine jewelry!


#4

I think you’ll get mixed reviews on this one. The people I’ve talked
to who’ve been stringing for years (and also bought the tool) said
they were faster useing their tweezers; so it just sits in the drawer.
But those who learn on it from the start are happy with it. I use tweezers.


#5

I use it, infact I am on my second one. I actually wore the first one
out, but repaired it and keep it as a spare. The tool enables me to
actually knot faster than it took me to string the beads. You might
want to buy the tape that is available because the instructions are a
bit confusing, and once you see it done it is easy. Good luck. Dee Garza


#6

I cannot tell you just how much I love and adore the tri-cord
knotter. It is simple to use and creates evenly spaced knots without
difficulty. I would suggest that you have someone show you the
technique, as it is not exactly self-explanatory. I do not hesitate
to recommend it. Best wishes. Batya Stark


#7

Thanks to all of you who responded, both on and off-line, to my
question about the usefulness of the bead-knotting tool! I think it
worked out to about half who find it useful and half who said, don’t
bother! I think the dividing line may be whether one uses it from the
very beginning, as Randall Brooks remarked. Personally, I’m investing
in some sharp-nosed tweezers. Orchid rules! Judy Bjorkman
Lenandjudy@acmgfcu.net


#8

Judy, the main difference, to me, was that I never cut any silk or
cord, with the tri-cord knotter! It is very frustrating to be nearly
finished with a strand of pearls and cut the cord as you tighten the
knot with sharp tweezers. Curtis


#9
    Judy, the main difference, to me, was that I never cut any silk
or cord, with the tri-cord knotter!  It is very frustrating to be
nearly finished with a strand of pearls and cut the cord as you
tighten the knot with sharp tweezers.  Curtis 

Curtis, You can use polishing paper and break that sharp edge on the
tweezers to minimize cutting without reducing the effectiveness of the
tweezers.

My problem with the tri-cord knotter is that when I examined the
knots on a strand being knotted at a trade show, they were not very
tight. It wouldn’t take much wearing for the silk to look stretched
out with floating knots between the beads. When I string pearls, I
tie very tight knots on prestretched silk.

Just my POV,
Donna


#10

Decided to throw in my $.02 as well. Donna, I agree with your
assessment of the knots made during a show demo of the Tri-Cord
gizmo. In fact, when I asked about how to make knots "snug up"
against the bead, the demonstrator ended up breaking the cord in the
effort to draw the knot tighter against the bead. We all have our
own techniques. My mentor taught me to use the next bead to hold the
knot against the bead being knotted, while maintaining tension with
fingers only. [James Cook was good! I don’t recall him ever using an
awl either… I have to admit to using one though.] Judy in Kansas
where a cold front brought cooler temps and RAIN - all the wheat
farmers are cursing!

Judy M. Willingham, R.S.
Extension Associate
221 Call Hall Kansas State Univerisity
Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-1213 FAX (785) 532-5681