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Kiln Soldering


#1

In reference to making mokume in a stainless steel bag (?),
there is a most excellent video on the process by the
Pijanowski’s who I believe are out of the U of Michigan. They use
a clamping fixture and a coke furnace and bring the metals up to
white hot temperature for positive fusing.

I have made small pieces, 2x2 inches in 16 layers of fine silver
and copper, following the instructions in Robert von Neumann’s
book “The Design And Creation of Jewelry” (an excellent text).

I would be most interested in more specifics of the use of the
stainless and the kiln.

Bill
Ginkgo Designs
@WILLIAM_I_EISENBERG


#2
I have made small pieces, 2x2 inches in 16 layers of fine
silver and copper, following the instructions in Robert von
Neumann's book "The Design And Creation of Jewelry" (an
excellent text). 

You’re right, I have that one too!


#3
   In reference to making mokume in a stainless steel bag (?),
there is a most excellent video on the process by the
Pijanowski's who I believe are out of the U of Michigan. They
use a clamping fixture and a coke furnace and bring the metals
up to white hot temperature for positive fusing.

hi bill, a few years ago i took a class from james binion. he has
written an excellent text about the process on our own ‘tips
form the jewlers bench’. he uses the stainless(?) steel tool
wrap.

best regards,

geo fox


#4
I have made small pieces, 2x2 inches in 16 layers of fine
silver and copper, following the instructions in Robert von
Neumann's book "The Design And Creation of Jewelry" (an
excellent text). 

Back in 1978, I was in the jewelry department as a student at
the University of Illinois. Robert von Neumann was the head of
the department and his book was our text. I still refer to it
now and then. It is fun to see his name circulating here. It is
a great reference!

Karen


#5

Hi,

In-furnace soldering is a technique used quite a bit by dental
techs to join bridge work after the porcelain has been applied
and glazed and it will not tolerate a direct flame. The pieces
are joined with stickey wax or Duralay (dental acrylic),
invested in soldering investment, and slowly brought up to
900-1000 degrees F. which burns the wax or plastic off
cleanly(let it heat soak for about 10 min.) Solder which is
fluxed is placed in position (the areas to be joined should have
flux applied before they are covered with the wax or Duralay).
The object is then slowly brought up to soldering temp. If the
solder is reluctant to flow, a gentle tap with a solder pick
on the investment will usually do the trick. Large flat pieces
can be set on a piece of fire brick with the fluxed solder
already stuck in position.

Duralay is a marvelous product. It is a powder(polymer)/
liquid(monomer) plastic that is dimensionally stable. It can be
carved with burrs at slow speed and can also be used to make a
single sided mold to reproduce single sided pieces. Any
mistakes in the carving can be fixed with wax. If anyone wants
more info they can E-mail me directly.

Skip

                                  Skip Meister
                                NRA Endowment and
                                   Instructor
                                @Skip_Meister
                                09/04/9713:46:58

#6

I was just wondering if anyone out there uses a kiln instead of a
torch for soldering. Any tips on what temperature, how long to
leave the metal in the kiln, warm the metal before hand, or ???
would be greatly appreciated.

Susan