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Kerosene & polishing compounds


#1

O Wise Ones,

A couple years ago, I saw various tips on Orchid regarding using a
drop of kerosene in conjunction with polishing compounds. At the time
I didn’t have kerosene handy and used lighter fluid instead (just a
drop or two). I just realized that I’ve continued that practice
without even thinking about it. Now I wonder if there are benefits to
be gained from switching from lighter fluid to kerosene.

Thoughts?
Jamie


#2
Now I wonder if there are benefits to be gained from switching from
lighter fluid to kerosene. 

Jamie I’m not sure it’s fair to say you’ve been wasting your time,
but probably. Aside from the fire hazard (just to mention it…), the
two things are like night and day. Lighter fluid is most always
naptha - a light mixture of fairly highly refined HC’s. Kerosene is
much father down the food chain in the refining business. Meaning
that naptha is more solvent or fuel, kerosene is also a fuel but it’s
more closely related to oil. This is a deeper way of saying that if
you rub naptha between your fingers it will feel like gasoline, and
quickly evaporate. Do the same with kerosene and it will feel
slightly oily, and linger for a long time…Kerosene has long been
used as a light lubricant in many fields for that very reason - it’s
like a very very light oil.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#3

John,

OMG(osh)!!! Thanks for the thorough explanation. I guess that I’ll be
purchasing some kerosene soon. I assume that an "approved container"
is required - I wonder what they’ll say when I show up with my
5-gallon container, and only purchase 2-3 ounces of kerosene :wink:

Thanks,
Jamie


#4
OMG(osh)!!! Thanks for the thorough explanation. I guess that I'll
be purchasing some kerosene soon. I assume that an "approved
container" is required - I wonder what they'll say when I show up
with my 5-gallon container, and only purchase 2-3 ounces of
kerosene ;-) 

I don’t know what you’re polishing, and what polish you use, but if
kerosene works, chances are that WD-40 will work, or lamp oil, both
available in small quantities.

Al Balmer
Sun City, AZ


#5
I don't know what you're polishing, and what polish you use, but
if kerosene works, chances are that WD-40 will work, or lamp oil,
both available in small quantities. 

WD 40 is mostly Stoddard Solvent (similar to kerosene but a little
more volatile) and light mineral oil and 10% inert ingredients. Lamp
oil is “odorless” kerosene basically a highly refined kerosene. I
would stick with the lamp oil.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#6

Why not try Brownpolymer it not flammable and leaves a protective
film it would be safer

Randy
AKA Enjen Joes


#7
I wonder what they'll say when I show up with my 5-gallon
container, and only purchase 2-3 ounces of kerosene ;-) 

You can purchase pints or at least quarts of kerosene at OSH, Lowes,
Home Depot etc…

Dan


#8

FYI, lamp oil is a further refined version of kerosene. It’s readily
available in smaller quantities in the candle section of department
stores. Buying a small bottle of lamp oil might be easier than
dragging in your giant container.

Judy in Kansas, where our first real winter storm is supposed to
blow in tonight and leave us with snow tomorrow.


#9
but if kerosene works, chances are that WD-40 will work, or lamp
oil, both available in small quantities. 

Those are considerably higher viscosity, but Al’s right, they might
work. Just to confuse the issue, here’s Enco’s lubricant portal:
http://www.use-enco.com

Just a few of the lubricants in the world to choose from - kerosene
is old-school, from back when light was kerosene and heavy was lard.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#10
Those are considerably higher viscosity, but Al's right, they
might work. Just to confuse the issue, here's Enco's lubricant
portal: http://www.use-enco.com

OK, OK, I give in.

Work for what? Why do you need kerosene or equivalent? It has
something to do with buffing, but…

Noel


#11

Noel asked why one would want to use kerosene in polishing. Well, I
wouldn’t… Anyway, the original question referred to the archives.
I searched them, and without studying all 150 hits, I found this,
for one:

My polishing teacher simply said ‘If it’s not hot, it’s not
polished’. And so far it has seemed to be true, that was 10 years
ago. I find the heat reassuring and frequently feel as if I’m
actually trying to evenly cook the piece. The downside is you’ll not
be able to trust the first two fingers or thumbs on either hand to
tell you how hot your coffee is.

I did work with a guy that moistened his polishing compound with
kerosene, and it did seem to polish things up a little faster but you
wouldn’t believe the mess. Not sure if it cooled anything much. It
did leave me with the distinct urge to stay away from any open flame
(but in a jewellery studio? HA!).

And as has been discussed on this thread, kerosene has long been
used as a very light lubricant, especially by machinists,
watchmakers (turning, not watch lube) and the like. It’s probably
the lightest lubricant I know of in it’s natural state. I personally
have no use for it in the shop, but that’s pretty much the
story…It has long been replaced in industry by safer and more
effective lubricants - soluble oils…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#12
OK, OK, I give in. Work for *what*? Why do you need kerosene or
equivalent? It has something to do with buffing, but....

I packed up my studio in the 1980’s and didn’t unpack it until a
couple of years ago. When I did, the rouge and the tripoli were hard
as rocks. With a drop or two of kerosene (or in my case I’m now using
ultra-pure lamp oil) on the compound sticks prior to touching it to
the buffing wheel, the compound applies evenly. As John mentioned,
there are probably much more modern lubes. But since I only need a
few drops, this is handy and it works.

Jamie


#13

for a light, fast drying lubricant, rust preventative and even to
pre-charge a lap, or other studio uses I have become fond of
"extreme graphite"- from the makers of spackle-in-a-can…it preforms
beautifully in any application I have used any oily stuff on in the
past with the added benefit of microfine graphite that doesn’t pool,
or cake or otherwise collect in a mass and seems to enhance polishing
when the material being polished (metals to rough cabs, to pricey
precious stone rough for fine faceted gems) requires any slurries.
The scent is no more offensive than "brown polymer (- in fact less
so!) which has a number of cons, or wd-40 with its distinct solvent
scent that lingers. It dries faster than the dry-spray lithium lubes
and lasts perhaps 4 times longer than anything else I have
tried.


#14

The company i work for manufactures many compounds and finishing
materials with the correct consistency to do the polishing job as
fast and cool as possible Stoddards solvent is used exstensively as
you mentioned. Machine types and speeds do the rest.

The only time we found when you need heat during polishing is with
stainless steel.Itseems you are actually moving the metal- leveling
it out rather than abrading it so you need heat When making stainless
pots a lot of heat is generated during the polishing operation
-actually smoke is visible. The only reason one would use kerosene is
to dilute the polishing compounds this would result in the abrasive
particles being less concentrated then you would have to polish
longer and push harder.

In Ghana they use kerosene to sand Aliuminium to prevent it clogging
the abrasive paper / cloth.Thats the only reason to use kerosene to
prevent clogging??

Frank


#15
It's probably the lightest lubricant I know of in it's natural
state. 

Nothing natural about kerosene, just another refined oil product.
Sure doesn’t come out of the ground as kerosene. All of my polishing
compounds are basically metal oxides mixed with wax and other
petroleum products, throw in some buff fluff and it is flammable
(especially with the forced draft of the suction). I don’t think
that a few extra drops ( or ml) are going to make that much of a
difference other than the mess potential.

Jeff
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand