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Jury photographs of your booth


#1

A couple of months ago there was a lengthy discussion about jury
quality photos. I had written about my troubles with a photographer,
and after reading my post, Beth Rosengard contacted me off this forum
and generously offered to help. I had no idea who she was, nor that
she’s had many of her pieces published including the piece on the
Inaugural cover of Jewelry Artist magazine. Beth took my
"professionally" taken photographs and fixed them so that now I have
pictures that I feel confident submitting to a jury. I know this is a
little delayed, but a huge thank you to Beth for your kindness and
helpfullness.

I am starting to look at art shows for the spring and summer, and
many of the shows require a photograph of your booth. I have
scattered pictures that I have taken of my booth as it has evolved,
but I don’t think these pictures are good enough. Now that I have
great photos of my work to submit, what does a jury look for in a
booth photo? Quantity of goods? Space to move around? Setup and
displays? I have some nice display busts and other things to display
items on, but don’t have glass or plexiglass cases. I think I display
my work tastefully, but what might the “WOW” factors be for booth
photographs?

Thanks for any thoughts.
Priscilla Fritsch
LuckyDog Designs


#2

Most shows, unfortunately, don’t tell us how they are using the jury
photos. Is it part of the jury process? Is it to see how we will
look at their show? What?

Put your best foot forward here. I assume they will jury my booth
with my work. I want the work and booth to look good together. I
once helped jury a small show in the NW. We had accepted a 2-d artist
who did large abstracts. Her booth slide showed small fussy paintings
of flowers. There was much concern which art would show up at the
show, or a mish mash of both. She was in a tie with some other 2-d
artists. I think she was juried out.

Then there was the booth shot, done on a hot day. The sides of the
tent were rolled up to let the breezes thru. The most prominent
feature of the image were the brite blue porta potties behind the
booth. And I could go on.

Our favorite booth shot was one that had been set up in a foot of
snow. Obviously it was not at a show. But the artist had given us a
great booth shot, he was in. Porta potty man was out.

You are displaying your business to the show. Present your booth as
it will look at their show, and make it look as professional as
possible.

hth
Carla
www.carlamfox.com


#3

I would love to also have a section with booth photos, as we have a
section with bench photos. Those of us living in the “boonies” have
a hard time getting places to see really well done booths.

Beth in SC


#4

may I direct you to an excellent resource
www.luannudell.wordpress.com which has answered every question I had
about booths and booth photos.


#5

I’m not sure what they are specifically looking for other than
wanting to see a professional display…that you are not going to
show up with a camping table and beach umbrella etc type set up. They
like to keep some uniformity in appearance and the one thing I’ve
heard in particular, is that you need to have a white tent…most
markets want that.

Jeanne


#6

Priscilla,

I can pass along the tips from a PA State Guild of Craftsmen
workshop on jury photos, specific to booth shots. Hopefully, these
will help and are general enough to point you to good choices for
whatever show you’re applying to:

  1. Crop the clutter - make sure your shot is targeted on your booth
    display only, and is cropped to eliminate distractions such as the
    side of your neighbor’s booth, the ceiling lighting, etc.

  2. It’s far better to crop the shot to a portion of your booth than
    to make it too wide or too far back. The goal is to show how
    professionally you display your work, not the comprehensive
    documentation of the entire setup. A detail shot of a single wall or
    a partial angle of one side of the booth may be perfect. The shot
    should focus on your best display features - the case or shelf with
    your best busts with pieces on them, for example, and should give the
    "feel" of the booth.

  3. Make sure there are NO IDENTIFYING SIGNS and no people visible in
    the booth. Most juries are processing work “blind” - there should be
    no signage visible in your booth shot. However, if you have posters
    of your work (without identifying words), they can be in the picture.
    You should NOT be in your booth shot, and there should be no
    customers in the shot, either. I also tend to remove my “credit card
    logo” sign and such before taking a booth shot.

  4. Focus on clean, professional presentation, well-lit and well
    planned. Less is more (don’t think you have to put ALL your work into
    the booth before shooting… or for a show, for that matter). Make
    sure there is no “sales clutter” in the shot (your business card
    rack, pen holder, computer, stack of sales slips, trash can, etc., do
    NOT need to be in the shot) and no trash.

Hope this helps!

Karen Goeller
No Limitations Designs
Hand-made, one-of-a-kind jewelry


#7
I think I display my work tastefully, but what might the "WOW"
factors be for booth photographs? 

For sample pictures, see the blogs of Luann Udell and Noel Y.

To see a lot of really not so great booth shots, see the Flikr group
for craft fairs. There may be some great booths there, but there are
1000s of pictures and I got bored before I found one.

For a ton of excellent, specific, extremely helpful articles on booth
design, plus sales stuff, see Luann Udell’s blog. Just do a google
search, her artist website comes up first, then her blog. Or there’s
a link on my blogroll on my blog.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#8
Setup and displays. 

I think they are looking for an attractive display that will add to
their event, not detract from it. They don’t want to see jewelry
simply put on a folding table with a cloth thrown over it. Have you
seen the event? How did it look? Is your booth going to fit in well
there? At many shows, cases are not necessary, but I think you
should have a display with fitted table covers, several levels of
display area, and an otherwise professional look.

M’lou Brubaker
Minnesota, USA
http://www.craftswomen.com/M’louBrubaker


#9
I think they are looking for an attractive display that will add
to their event, not detract from it. 

Exactly. And enhance the jewelry without detracting from it. I went
to a group show last weekend in Chicago and saw a great booth, I
keep trying to remember it so I can describe it, but I can’t.

It was such a good display that it was invisible. All I know is that
it was black and made the jewelry stand out.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#10
the one thing I've heard in particular, is that you need to have a
white tent....most markets want that. 

Even more important is that any other color tent will not show your
jewelry well - blue or green reflections are so misleading. Judy in
Kansas, where the weather forecaster says we will see colder temps
and ice/snow! Brrrr.


#11

I applied for a show which didn’t allow draped tables at the show. I
had to send in a photo of a “custom” booth. Having never used
anything but a draped table, I sent in sketches of what I was going
to do with an explanation as well as photos of the shelving units I
was planning on using.

Worked for me in that case.

Amery
Amery Carriere Designs
Romantic Jewelry with an Edge
www.amerycarriere.com


#12

My booth mate and I have been working on our booth setup, this fall.
It is looking better, but I still think it could be improved. If I
posted a link to some pics of our booth, at various shows, would
some of you’ll be willing to critic them? We make a combination of
forged and formed work, some seed bead work and some 'straight’
stringing (it only goes out at some shows–where that is what folks
are looking for). It will probably be first of the week before I can
get some pics up and organized, since I’ve got a show this weekend.

Cairenn, the Howling Artist


#13
My booth mate and I have been working on our booth setup, this
fall. It is looking better, but I still think it could be improved.
If I posted a link to some pics of our booth, at various shows,
would some of you'll be willing to critic them? 

Sure. Just post the link here and I have no doubt you’ll get tons of
feedback :-).

Beth