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Jump ring problem


#1

I am hoping someone on the list can point out some obvious
solution to a problem I am having. I am constructing a necklace
out of pieces that are patinaed (sp?) and then layered together
with rivets. I am trying to connect these elements with large
sterling jump rings, maybe 5/8" or so in diameter. My problem is
that I can’t solder the jump rings closed because it will ruin the
other elements and the rings want to open when I put any stress on
the piece at all. The only solution I could come up with was a
heavier gauge jump ring but this would change the looks of the
piece. Let me know if you have any other solutions.

While I’m asking questions, does anyone know of a good way to make
jump rings from square wire without having the wire twist as you
wrap it? I seem to be able to get around my dowel about 2 or 3
times before it starts to twist.

Thanks all - Deb … in the finally sunny midwest


#2

Hi Deb

It seems to me that you should be able to solder a jump ring
larger than half inch diameter and pickle the solder joint without
disturbing a patinaed piece if you can use a small, hot flame. But
if that can be done perhaps the ends of the jump ring wire could be
joined with a squash tube or bead. The scale’s large enough.
Another option is a split ring (the small, key ring style jump
ring) but they are rather cheesy. If the holes in your patinaed
pieces are near the edges you might try making a jump ring that
goes around twice or more and thread them on. A third option would
be to use wire fine enough to twist the ends closed. Hmmm???
That’s all that comes to mind.

Re: square wire jump rings.

Square wire wants to naturally wants to bend on its diagonal.
When it bends on a diagonal smaller volumes of metal on the inside
and outside of the bend are being compressed and stretched. That
makes the diagonal the bend orientation of least resistance.

I’ve let the wire feed through a square drawplate held against my
jump ring mandrel. Try the hole one size larger than the wire was
drawn through, it should be close enough to the size of the wire to
keep the orientation square. That should do the trick. Good luck.

Dick Caverly


#3

Greetings Deb

Re the problem you are having with the jumprings. Would it up set
the design if you made the jumpring like the ring used for keys,
that is two turns of the jump ring coil and then cut emery down
each face till they are flat then thread them on as if putting a
key on a ring. Wire would need to be hard drawn so they spring back
in place.

As for the problem with winding square wire into jump rings I use
a ring clamp that has leather faces and clamp this on the wire
tight while winding the wire on to the mandrel. This gives a nice
tight coil on the mandrel and with square wire will stop it from
twisting.

Just some thoughts Deb. Hope it helps in some way.

Best wishes.

Major

Major Boyce @pyramid

The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.

EVERYBODY has a talent. What is rare is the courage to follow that talent to
the dark place where it leads.


#4

Hi Deb,

  My problem is that I can't solder the jump rings closed because
it will ruin the other elements and the rings want to open when I
put any stress on the piece at all.  The only solution I could
come up with was a heavier gauge jump ring but this would change
the looks of the piece.  Let me know if you have any other
solutions.

You didn’t say what kind (material & shape) & guage wire you’re
using for jump rings. Assuming it’s round wire,the wire could be
work hardened befo re winding into coils to make the rings from.
Rings made from hardened wire resist opening much better than those
made from dead soft or half hard wire. Here’s a method to work
harden any wire.

  1. Clamp 1 end of the wire in a vise or twist it around a secure
    object.

  2. Clamp a hook in the chuck of a portable electric drill (a
    manual one will work, but it takes lots longer).

  3. Secure the other end of the wire to the hook in the drill.

  4. Draw the wire taut with the drill.

  5. While holding the wire taut, turn on the drill.

  6. Let the drill tun, twisting the wire about it’s own axis, until
    the wire breaks, usually at one of the ends.

  7. The wire is now as hard.

Coils wound from hardened wire tend to open up (become a larger
diameter)

after winding. However, all coils wound on the same mandrel from
the same wire supply will be the same size. If the size of the jump
ring is critical, a little experimentation will help determine the
size mandrel t o wind the coils on to acheive a given size. If
you’re making coils of a non-ferous wire shape (other than round)
that can’t be twisted, The coils may be heat hardened. Place the
coils in an oven or kiln at about 600F for about an hour. Turn the
oven/kiln off & leave the coils there until cool enough to handle.

  While I'm asking questions, does anyone know of a good way to
make jump rings from square wire without having the wire twist as
you wrap it?  I seem to be able to get around my dowel about 2 or
3 times before it starts to twist.

The following describes making & using a tool to prevent other
than round wire from twisting when winding it into coils. The size
of the tool & the material it’s made from can be changed to suit
the material at hand. However, these sizes have worked
satisfactorily in the past.

Tool manufacture.

  1. Cut aprox 4 inches from the end of a flat wooden paint stirring
    paddle Any suitable piece of wood aprox 1 1/2 in wide & 1/4 in
    thick will work.

  2. Draw a line the long way in the center of the 4 inch piece.

  3. Mark the centerline 1/4 inch from each end.

  4. Place the 4 inch piece on top of the remainder of the paint
    paddle so the cut ends & both sides are flush. If making the tool
    from a piece of wood, the 2nd piece of wood should be about 8
    inches long to afford a handle.

  5. Tape (masking tape) the two pieces together. Leave the marks
    visible.

  6. Drill a 3/16 inch hole through both pieces where the top piece
    is marked.

  7. Insert a suitably sized round head machine screw (eg. 8-32 X
    1in) in each hole.

  8. Secure the screw with a matching wing nut. A flat washer under
    each wi ng nut may aid adjustment.

Tool use.

  1. Loosen both wing nuts enough to allow the wire to pass between
    the woo d.

  2. Insert the wire from the handle to the front, to the right of
    one screw & left of the other, so about 1 inch protrudes from the
    front. Insert the wire so the side that is to be on the inside of
    the coil is on the bottom of the tool.

  3. Tighten the screws just enough to put a slight drag on the wire
    when it’s pulled. The front screw should be tighter than the back.
    Some adjustment may be required when coil wrapping begins & after
    the wire has worn a groove in the wood.

  4. Attach the end of the proturding wire to the mandrel & beging
    wrapping the coil. Resting the end of the tool rest against the
    newly wound coil will aid in guiding the wire onto the mandrel. The
    tool can be turned like a screwdriver to guide the wire on to the
    mandrel in the correct orientation.

Contact me off list if you’ve got any questions.

Good luck!

Dave


#5

Deb - What about flattening the jump rings. You could then overlap
the ends and rivet them closed. As for your other problem, I belive
Dave Arens (David D. Arens" <GEMSTONES_ETC@compuserve.com) makes a
guide for making jump rings with square or half round wire. Send
him a request for his price list.

Steven Brixner - Jewelry Designer - San Diego CA USA
mailto:brixner@compuserve.com
http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/brixner


#6

Hi, Deb,

Another option would be to use a heat sink. It might be worth a
try to cover your patinated pieces with a couple of layers of wet
cloth or paper before you solder the jump rings. That should
protect the patina from the heat, and in my admittedly limited
experience a little moisture does not hurt a patina.

Lee
Dos Manos Jewelry
Phoenix, AZ


#7

D eb, Don’t know what sort of torch you are using, but if you have
a Little Torch, using a #5 tip with a large flame, place the part
to be protected in a dish o water and solder the joint holdin the
ring out o water with tweezers , third hand or whatever. I use
this technique occasionally on j-rings much smaller than the ones
you have. Hope this helps Jerry in Kodiak


#8

Thanks to all who responded to my jump ring problem. I have lots
of ideas to try. The hints on wrapping square wire were extremely
helpful. - Deb


#9

Well, Tripps Manufacturing (Socorro, NM) has a jump ring that is
like a key chain; I’m assuming other companies have it too.

It is tricky to create jump rings from square wire, but it is
possible. I’m a wire-wrapper and I have made quite a few :slight_smile:

The solution for me was to completely straighten the wire before
starting. Also, once it is straight, I insert the mandrell/stick
into my Dremel or a small collet added to a power drill. For some
strange reason, the wire seems to “feed” onto the coil better at
high speeds.

Sometimes, I “borrow” my hubbys hands and I work the Dremel as he
guides the wire.

'Sure hope this helps! (SE Iowa–where the April showers that
bring May flowers just won’t stop dumping their bountiful blessing)