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Johnson's paste wax


#1

I was told recently that you could use Johnson’s paste wax to coat
copper and prevent it from tarnishing.

A) Is this true? I don’t want to use clear nailpolish.

B) I’m having a hard time finding Johnson’s paste wax. Would another
paste wax work, or is there something about Johnson’s paste wax that
works?

Thanks,
Miachelle


#2

Try a Mom and Pop hardware store. I use it for my bench top, if you
buildup a nice thick coat, boric acid residue wipes right off.

Robert L. Martin
Goldsmith/platinumsmith
Diamond setter


#3

Miachelle,

Regarding your inquiry about paste wax being used to prevent copper
from tarnishing, I can tell you that I used it on my first project
for school almost four years ago and it’s been tarnish-free ever
since. However, I don’t wear the item. If this was something that was
to be worn, you’re probably better off with some sort of lacquer. I
don’t recall if I used Johnson’s Paste Wax specifically, but I’m sure
a visit to Lowe’s or some home improvement store would give you a
similar item.

Good luck. Hope that helps.

Tammy Kirks


#4

Miachelle,

There are other paste waxes that should do just as well as
Johnson’s. One that comes to mind is called Butcher’s Bowling Alley
Wax, available at a good hardware store. I have had good long term
success with Krylon Clear Acrylic spray on some large copper fold
form wall relief sculptures. It is available in both matte and gloss
finishes.

Joel Schwalb
@Joel_Schwalb
www.schwalbstudio.com


#5

Hi Miachelle:

I'm having a hard time finding Johnson's paste wax. Would another
paste wax work, or is there something about Johnson's paste wax
that works? 

I used Renaissance Wax on a neckpiece a while back and it has held
up really well. The appearance of the silver is somewhat “white” or
"cloudy" however. I think I needed to buff it more than I did. You
can find this wax at www.woodcraft.com (it’s where I got it). It’s a
supplier for woodworkers.

Good Luck
Kim Starbard
Cove Beads


#6

Miachelle

I'm having a hard time finding Johnson's paste wax. Would another
paste wax work, or is there something about Johnson's paste wax
that works? 

I think it may be the carnauba that is the workable ingredient, I
have used it on steel but not jewelry. Might try it though and it
should be safe, the FDA lets them use it on candy.

Terry


#7
I'm having a hard time finding Johnson's paste wax. Would another
paste wax work, or is there something about Johnson's paste wax
that works? 

Sure it’s true, works great. Just go down to your favorite local
hardware store, such as Ace or True Value. Johnson’s is a furniture
wax.

Turtle car wax also works.

If you want to get fancy, use Renaissance Wax.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#8

Hi Miachelle,

I don’t know if this will be harder to find than Johnson’s Paste
floor Wax but I have used “Mothers” Carnuba wax, for fine automotive
finishes, with great success on holloware, sculptures, and jewelry. I
think it is harder than floor wax, you use less - so not as great a
chance for build up, and the smell is wonderbar (carnua wax is from a
tree). Try looking in a large hardware store or any place that stocks
automotive supplies.

Good luck,
Donna
Donna Hiebert Design


#9
I was told recently that you could use Johnson's paste wax to coat
copper and prevent it from tarnishing. 

It is true, except I like consevators wax much better. I also use
Flitz to polish and coat.

Jerry


#10

wax, well I buy carnuba wax in a bar form, apply it to a new muslin
buff and keep only for the wax. Then I buff my silver with it. I also
buff my finished enamels with it. It doesn’t take much. I learned
this from a wood turner.

Jennifer Friedman
Ventura, CA


#11

Miachelle wrote asking for a source of Johnson’s paste wax. I would
look at auto parts stores. It has been a while since I bought any
but that was my source at the time.

Hope this helps,
Francis


#12

As this topic has kind of run its course I’ll throw in another
thought.

I have, as is my way, gone another route. I have in the past bought
the very finest clear lacquer I could afford.

Then cut it to water thin and gently air brush the work. The lacquer
appears to be absorbed into the oxides and or sulfides. It seals
thing

up. There is little change in color and I feel it is more stable
then wax. You will need a little spray booth and ventilation. Food for
thought.

Bill
Thank you, Bill, Deborah, Michele & Sarah
Reactive Metals Studio, Inc.


800/876-3434, 928/634-3434, F928/634-6734


#13

I like using ACF-50, it works great and you only need to spray it on
once every couple years if its worn a lot. A 13 oz can is $13.00 US
and you can protect a heck of a lot of jewelry with this stuff.

  ANTI-CORROSION,13OZ AEROSOL An ultra thin compound, ACF-50
  will penetrate tight lap seams, around rivets and screws,
  between spars and skins. Effective on all metals, cables,
  switches and avionics. Actually displaces corrosion causing
  moisture. Then it acts as a barrier, keeping moisture away and
  terminating electrolysis for about one and a half years.
  MIL-C-81309 E type II & III. Minimum flash point 140 degrees F.
  ORM-D Requires ground shipping only. 

I get it from Wickaircraft.com


#14

I’d like to thank everyone for their responses. The one
consideration I have to make is my necklace is a finished product,
and includes red suede leather. I need to be very careful regardless
of what product I use, so I do not stain the red leather I used in
the necklace. I’m guessing that applying with a fine brush will aid
in this issue.

Thank you all! You’ve been a tremendous help.

Miachelle


#15
Miachelle wrote asking for a source of Johnson's paste wax. I
would look at auto parts stores. It has been a while since I bought
any but that was my source at the time. 

I bought some last year at a large hardware store. It came in a
yellow metal can, about 5 inches in diameter by 2 inches high.

M’lou Brubaker, Jeweler
Goodland, MN
www.craftswomen.com


#16

A certain very large home improvement store did not carry it, but a
different brand. I was concerned as to whether the brand made a
difference.

Thank you,
Miachelle


#17

I have been using Renaissance wax which seems to be a standard for
conservation. It is a bit more expensive than the floor and
automobile waxes which are probably fine for jewelry. Any silicone in
the regular commercial waxes are potentially a problem on furniture
and wood objects that may need refinishing someday. SEE:
http://www.restorationproduct.com or just google Renaissance wax

jesse


#18
I have had good long term success with Krylon Clear Acrylic spray
on some large copper fold form wall relief sculptures. It is
available in both matte and gloss finishes. 

We use Krylon clear Matt acrylic fixative on cupric nitrate patina.
It gives a harder more scratch-resistant finish and doesn’t look
quite as ‘chalky’. Because it’s matt - it still somewhat maintains
the patina finish.

Sandra
Sandra Noble Goss
Owen Sound, On Canada