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Job Seeking


#1

hello all can any body help me to find a good site to put my resume
on line for a jewlery position and willing to relocate?

thanks in advance Ata


#2

www.jobs4gems.com is a site in the industry.
What are your skill levels, maybe I can direct you to some people.

David Geller


#3

Hi Ata; I’d recommend http://www.Cgroup1.com the Christiansen Group.
They are probably the most highly regarded placement service in the
trade, from what I’ve heard. You could also try
http://www.jobs4gems.com and while you’re there, take a look at some
of the positions offered. I know of at least one of our members who
has a position listed there. By the way, there’s a position offered
at http://www.russellsofcamden.com/. I’ll forward you the posting.

David L. Huffman


#4

It isn’t online but you could try SNAG News to place a small
classified ad. It is free. Email Nancy Monkman, the editor, at
nanman@earthlink.net

Don Friedlich


#5

Hi Ata, The jewelers that I know don’t look for employees on line.
Here are some of the things I have done when looking for new staff:
A/ I call the state Unemployment Commission and let them know what
skills I am looking for. They add that request to the ir database,
which lets ANYONE looking for a job search the database to look for
prospective employers. This costs no on e a dime. B/ I place an ad
in the nearest large city newspaper. You can go to a library in most
places and search these newspapers, or often you can search them
on-line. C/ I keep my eyes and ears open when I visit other stores,
any store, looking for good attentive sales people who smile a lot
and don’t seem confused or half-asleep. No backward baseball caps,
if you get my drift. If I like what I see I give them my card and
ask them to call me if they ever hear of someone with skills as good
as thei rs who might consider changing employment.

Generally, I have found that folks who take the time to call ME or
visit ME get my attention. Even if they just send me their resume
with an attached letter, I feel they are aggressive enough to go
after what they want. Frankly, someone loo king for just a paycheck
and benefits, doesn’t interest me much. I want to know how they will
be a GREAT addition to our business. I also NEED to know their
skill level. For instance, we make one-of-a-kind pieces, often using
unusual metals or stones. This calls for a higher skill level than is
often seen, and I need to have some way of verifying that skill
level. The person who brings in examples of their work, not
pictures, gets my attention quickly.

Also, and maybe it’s just a typo (I’m a good speller but a lousy
typist), but re-read your post and look at how you spell ed
"jewelry". When I get a resume and words pertinent to our trade are
incorrectly spelled, guess what sort of first imp ression that
makes? When you’re competing with others for the prize (a job), you
hardly ever get a second chance to make a good first impress ion.
Polish it. You gave nio clue as to what sort of employment you are
looking for, but why don’t you send ME a resume anyway…include a
complete description of previous employment, if any,
responsibilities, training, time in the profession, your goals, wh
ere you’d prefer living, etc. I know that it is popular to creat
one-page resumes today, but ignore that.

Good luck,

Wayne Emery
Jewelry Design Studio
Tacoma WA
wmemery11@attbi.com


#6

Hi Ata,

I am looking for a job myself. The best sites to post your resume
depend on what position you are looking for. For any type of
position, http://www.monster.com and http://www.hotjobs.com are
widely used and good to have your resume on.

If you are looking for a bench jeweler/repair/soldering/polishing
position, the NY Times has more of that type then any of the other
sources I’ve seen,

and you can post your resume there. I would recommend checking them
daily since I think you need to pay to register in order to search
resumes and some places may not bother to do this. Also check
National Jeweler magazine,

http://www.national-
jeweler.com/nationaljeweler/business_resources/classifieds.jsp,

AJM magazine (under Resources, AJM Marketplace)

http://www.ajm-magazine.com/mainframe.html, GIA

http://www.gia.org/careers/cagradpositions.cfm, America's Job Bank

http://www.ajb.org/ny/key.html, and USA Today,

http://careers.usatoday.com/service/usa/national/EndUser/?srv=EndUser&act=Ho
mepage

If you are looking for a job in the jewelry manufacturing industry -
designer, model maker, etc. there are a number of sites and head
hunters devoted to the fashion industry. A few of these that you can
send resumes and/or search for jobs aRe:

http://www.wwd.com/classified/wwdads.htm
http://www.fashioncareercenter.com/
http://www.apparelstaffing.com/cgi-bin/jobs.cgi
http://www.karlyn.com/
http://www.gromwell.com/

A lot of this is in the New York area (where I am). If you want to
tell me specifically what position you are looking for maybe I can
tell you if I’ve seen anything or where your best place to look would
be. Feel free to email me if you have any questions.

Jill
http://www.jjewelry.com


#7

I think most of what Wayne had to say was pretty much on target and
should be common sense for any adult who is seriously looking for a
job or an opportunity to advance their career. However, I also had
the feeling (possibly mistaken) that Ata was asking if anyone had
suggestions for job hunting which might be more productive rather
than coaching on how to impress a shop owner.

Secondly, (not trying to start anything here, just my opinion) if a
colleague is mercenary enough to come into MY shop and blatantly
attempt to poach MY best employees by handing out business cards,
that person would not be welcome in MY shop for very long. As a shop
owner, I would be wondering if that individual might be coveting
other aspects of my business besides the employees with whom I have
invested time, money and in some cases…emotional energy? More
importantly, as a potential employee, is this really someone I want
to work for? Are they someone who is going to look out for me when
times are tough?

Just my .02. Ata, good luck with the job hunt. Keep your eyes and
ears open, life brings marvelous treasures where you least expect.

-Mike


#8

Mike, I agree with your .02.Unfortunately it is suprisingly common
for managers and district managers of large chains to go head hunting
at competitors stores.I do work for six stores that have had managers
and jewelers and sales associates all jump ship in fact the VP’s and
upper crust have all come from other stores and much of the time are
recruited in this manner.Basically you get the same teams that worked
for zales or other chains working in other stores it is a revolving
source of employment and when one of thesre large chains and their
upper management burn up profits for the stock holders they file for
chapter 11 and everybody jumps ship again.I have seen this happen on
three occasions.It is like the same pirates are sailing the ships
over and over again.As a former indi shop owner I was amazed by it
all .The upper management does not even have a budget for advertising
for employees.They encourage this type of behavior.Such is
life.Regards J Morley


#9
  Basically you get the same teams that worked for zales or other
chains working in other stores it is a revolving source of
employment and when one of thesre large chains and their upper
management burn up profits for the stock holders they file for
chapter 11 and everybody jumps ship again.I have seen this happen
on three occasions.It is like the same pirates are sailing the
ships over and over again.As a former indi shop owner I was amazed
by it all .The upper management does not even have a budget for
advertising for employees.They encourage this type of behavior.Such
is life.Regards J Morley 

Hi J. Morley, I fully agree with you… The same story is true with
the larger jewelry Manufacturers that are left in the USA… In the
70’s and 80’s, There was a large number of highly skilled employees
in RI. … people with lots of experience due to the tremendous
volume being manufactured. Part of the loss in jewelry manufacturing
jobs was in directly created by poor management in large companies
… I’ll explain.

When a very skilled caster/foreman or stonesetter… basically any
job requiring many years of knowledge to be able to handle any
circumstance, achieved a financial position that the company
managers deemed to be too high, the managers had them train people
to do some of the jobs they did… then , perhaps a year later, they
would lay them off… After a few years of this, skilled people in
the area became disgusted with this practice and found other
employment… Now, The big shots/ managers who did this type of
practice are still employed today , and the result is a bunch of
larger companies that no longer have the skills they used to have…
this is the “old Buddy Sindrome” . I have been asked occasionally
to be a consultant for a few of them and told them that before I do
any consultant work , to realize that I’m in the business for many
years and that it will cost probably about $1300/day ( yes,
Expensive, but… realize that I would be leaving my company
unattended for a few days and this will cost me!) What I have usually
found is employees that don’t have the training … and managers who
have been in the field for many years with no knowledge other than
being able to push paper around and make themselves look good. Don’t
get me wrong… There are some people who are very knowledgeable and
skilled in the field… But not many . Daniel Grandi

We do casting finishing and a whole lot more for designers and
people in the trade. Contact off list at Sales@racecarjewelry.com