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[Job opportunity] [MO] Full time Bench Jeweler


#1

Jeanne Taylor
Taylor’s Jewelry, Rolla, MO

Taylor’s Jewelry has immediate opening for Full time Bench Jeweler.
Take home $27,000 - $32,000 per year depending on experience.
Taylor’s is a familyowned business in Rolla, MO, with 4,000 square
feet of showroom and large repair shop with 2 jeweler’s benches.
Owner is a master jeweler willing to provide additional training if
necessary. Job hours are Tuesday thru Friday8-5 and Sat. 8-3
(Mondays in December). Benefits include paid vacation, paid sick
leave, & retirement. Job includes jewelry repairs (ring sizing,
soldering, stone setting, re-tipping, etc.) working with customers,
taking in repairs, and repair shop management. Contact Daren at
573-368-9822 or Jeanne at 573-465-0582 or email at [taylors at
fidnet.com] Don’t miss out on this fantastic opportunity!


#2

Hi if I did the maths right that is less than $18 an hour.

My daughter gets more for making coffee here in OZ.

You guys do it tough in the US.

Makes my hourly rate of $40 look like a fortune.

Richard


#3

You got that right, my friend. But many Americans would be lucky to
make 30k so this is a good job to many people and will be appreciated
for now. I think my US of A is heading towards a revolution. I don’t
see how many jewelry customers will exist if we have another 30 years
of the middle and poor class Losing income while the top 1% have made
120% of the gains in the last few years. Not only is the minimum wage
in Australia over 18 dollars in u. smoney, they also have free health
care. Australia has avoided recessionsfor over 25 years by paying
their citizens a living wage and providing single payer health care.
USA now has the income inequality of a third world banana republic
while having one of the highest GDP’s. I’m ashamed of what has
happened to my country.

Could you imagine all of the jewelry sales we would have if one of
the richest nations in the world decided to make minimum wage to the
23 dollars an hour that our GDP easily supports while having a single
payer health care? But that makes too much sense so let’s just head
towards even more insane income inequality and widespread poverty.

Rick Powell


#4

Here in the central part of the US, our cost of living is lower than
that of our coastal cities, which makes this job sound not too bad.
If I lived just a bit closer, I would definitely consider it!

Janice Lea


#5

Rick

When you are done dumping this bilge, I have a bridge to sell you.
Jewelers in OZ are having the same tough times we are.

Sam


#6

Sam. It’s funny you mention a bridge since we refuse to invest in
our infrastructure. I was just pointing out that they have avoided a
recession forover 25 years. I want good fortune for all.

So yes, I will buy your bridge. :slight_smile:

Rick Powell


#7
Here in the central part of the US, our cost of living is lower
than that of our coastal cities, which makes this job sound not too
bad. 

Not so bad. Since when a goldsmith should settle for a job which is
not so bad? I have a short story to tell. I once worked with russian
goldsmith specializing in 19 century reproductions. Man of
tremendous talent. His diamond setting was absolutely breathtaking.

As good as he was, his father-in-law was even better, much better.
There was a manager in Cartier, literary stalking him, begging him to
come to work for Cartier. One day he got his wish and the old man
went to see the shop. He ask to show where he would be sitting and
was pointed to bench in the corner.

He turned around and asked manager not to bother him ever again.

I always give the same advice to beginners. The first priority must
be skill acquisition, because when you know what you are doing, you
do not have to accept “not so bad” offers. You do not have to accept
good or very good offers either. The acceptable offer must only be
excellent and only when you like the offerer. Always remember that
handcrafted jewellery can never be repeated. Each piece is unique and
priceless. Skilled goldsmith donates jewellery to a client in
exchange for money, but money only represent value of goldsmith time
and do not even come close to the real value of jewellery. Client
always gets the best deal, because one can alway make more money, but
nandwrought jewellery is irreplaceable.

When goldsmith accepts “not so bad offer”, goldsmith commits career
suicide. There is nothing to be learnt in places like that. The only
possible result will be a giant waste of time, and time is very
valuable.

Leonid Surpin
Studioarete.com


#8

Hi

yep in Oz it is tough but $18 an hour would not pay rent and food in
Sydney.

Rent $300 plus a room/week to live somewhere decent.

And no jeweller would work for less than a barista.

In capital cities jewellers charge $60 an hour for labour.

But then our banks did not lend 110% of a house’s value to some one
did not understand variable interest rates

and who could never pay it back and then the banks went bust, GFC
etc.

Our minimum wage is a lot more than the US.

Grand daughter wants wiggles.

TTFN

Richard


#9
Since when a goldsmith should settle for a job which is not so
bad? [snip] The only possible result will be a giant waste of time,
and time is very valuable.

Leonid, in essence I agree with you, but reality is a lot tougher.
Those here who know me know I have skills-- bench skills, creative
skills, teaching, leadership, writing, and others. But I am 62 years
old and was always self-employed until 2 years ago. I have a job,
but the pay is not really enough to live decently on, now that my
husband and I have split up and I’m pretty much on my own. I can’t
see trying to go back on the art fair treadmill that really wasn’t
working all that well even before the economy went south. I’m not a
bench jockey, and would go crazy trying to be one (no disrespect at
all-- I have my idiosyncrasies, and I cannot bear things I find
tedious, long term). I have to have creativity in my daily life–
it’s what I’m good at. What would you suggest I do?

I truly am open to suggestion. I tried uprooting and moving 2200 for
a job I thought would be the right thing for me. I came back to the
Chicago area to try to make it work with my husband. It didn’t work
out, but I tried.

There are only a few places I’d be willing to move again, at my age.

That may be too much but it’s the reality and not just
for me.

Life is hard, and good-- let alone excellent-- solutions do not
always materialize.

Noel


#10

Hi wiggles finished

apologies Sam et al just checked the award rates for jewellers in
OZ.

Top rate $17.30/hour

Guess that is why me and my mates work for ourselves.

My jewellery teacher told us to get a job as a cleaner and make
jewellery for friends and family and fun.

“But pay peanuts get monkeys!” as they say.

What you get paid depends on your skill level.

The owner of the shop makes the money and the workers get the
proverbial.

20 years ago I went for a job in a jewellers. He nearly had a heart
attack when I told him I wanted $25/hour.

He wanted to know why so much. I told him I can make an 18 kt bezel
set diamond solitaire in an hour and a half and you make hundreds

of dollars profit and you pay me $37. Would not let me talk to his
other jewellers. Did not get the job as I told him to expletive off.

This is a trade where people work for love not money.

Glad I am a top level trained high school teacher, 2 days a week $76
per hour.

Lets me make jewellery.

Richard


#11
I have a short story to tell... 

That was a great post Leonid.

I particularly appreciated and will remember, “Skilled goldsmith
donatesjewellery to a client in exchange for money, but money only
represent value of goldsmith time and do not even come close to the
real value of jewellery. Client always gets the best deal, because
one can always make more money, but handwrought jewellery is
irreplaceable.”

I agree with your ideals. Unfortunately I think it’s always a
struggle between survival and following your dream, whatever that
may be. Many have to take a job they would rather not and that sets
then back, or worse puts them completely off course from their
goals.

Mark


#12
Leonid, in essence I agree with you, but reality is a lot tougher. 

I remember watching a movie The Last American Virgin. While the
movie is basically idiotic, there was a short monolog, which was very
instrumental in my decision making. It goes like this:

" what the f. k is the most important phrase in American english.
The phrase gives one freedom ! And freedom brings opportunity ! "

I started my business not because I wanted to, but because I had no
choice. I was lured from Tiffany by a very attractive offer, which
turned out to be a scam. There was a watch manufactures who is no
longer in business. I was offered position of foreman of nonexistent
jewellery shop, that I was suppose to create.

To make the long story short, the owner’s son was getting married
and couple of managers wanted to give a nice present. But instead of
buying one, it was much cheaper to hire a dupe/jeweler to make one
under the guises of starting jewellery shop. My first and the last
order was a wedding parure. When it was finished, I was told that
plans have changed and I should clear out the premises.

In my job search afterward, I discovered that having Tiffany on
resume is more of a millstone around one’s neck than a benefit. Some
could not understand why I left Tiffany. Others had ideas that the
least of my skills should be walking on water and etc. So, I realize
that if I wanted a job, I had to create it myself. My childhood
friend was goldsmith as well, so we started a business as jewellery
contractors.

By the time we were done with all the logistics of starting a
business, we were so broke that a church mouse was wealthy in
comparison. We took any job that was offered, - engraving baby
bangles for 50 cents a piece, pave for 75 cents a stone, and so on.
I quickly learned that jewellery business was like swimming with
sharks. Slightest hesitation and you are eaten alive. We had a lot of
work, but we could barely pay rent, and when I tried to negotiate
better prices, I was told that it is impossible right now but may be
next year. So I said " what the f. k " If I am going to starve I can
do it watching TV and not working myself to death. I have promised
myself that if I ever touch gold again it will be on my own terms.

Nothing in life is easy. I know it very well how scary the prospects
of not been able to pay one’s bills are.

But there must be a realization that no matter how cheap one is
willing to work, someone will always try to make him/her work even
cheaper, and it never stops unless you put your foot down. Look
around yourself what people pay to other professionals. Why
goldsmiths think that they deserve less ? Just because jewellery is
not a necessity ? But it is nonsensical reasoning. Granted, not
everybody can afford fine jewellery, but so what? Not everybody can
afford fine wine either, but I do not see fine vineyards lowering
their prices. Luxury items are never on sale. Where this idea that
jewellery should be priced so everybody could afford it, comes from
? When I worked for Tiffany, they paid for our clothes. We were
reimbursed 90% no matter how expensive it was. The only requirement
was to wear it to work. Do you know why they were doing that ? They
wanted us to look like goldsmiths.

Leonid Surpin
Studioarete.com


#13
I started my business not because I wanted to, but because I had
no choice. 

I became self employed many years ago because I couldn’t find anyone
that I wanted to work for. It’s more work to be on your own for
sure, but much more satisfying. It’s better to make the decisions
that determine how you will spend your time and the work you will do
yourself. The money is also yours to handle and disperse based on
decisions you make. Your earning potential is no longer limited by
an hourly wage or salary. You get to deal with the big picture, the
whole enchilada, instead of just the jobs on your bench. That gives
you a greater sense of independence and control over you life in
what can be a very uncertain world.

Many people fear being self employed. I felt just the opposite, I
felt like working for someone else who could change my life without
my approval was very unsettling.

Mark


#14

Mark- I read a study a few years back that said that the stresses
from being self employed were different than those of the employed.
The self employed have more things to worry about. Taxes, book
keeping, ordering supplies, dealing with customers, drumming up biz,
etc. However the study found that it’s much more stressful to have
others make decisions for you that you have no control over.

Tim and I have a saying. “Why work 40 hours a week for the man when
you can work 100 hours a week for yourself”. We wouldn’t have it any
other way.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#15
Tim and I have a saying. "Why work 40 hours a week for the man
when you can work 100 hours a week for yourself". We wouldn't have
it any other way. 

Hahaha, isn’t that the truth! And you only have to work half-days,
that’s twelve hours.

Mark


#16

Thank you Leonid for your thoughtful post. It brought a smile to my
face and tears to my eyes. I have printed it as a reminder of the
ideal goal. One point has been missed in all this discussion
however. As you state in your post “…the first priority must be
skill acquisition…”. Following is a quote from the original posting
of this much talked about job offer.

Owner is a master jeweler willing to provide additional training if
necessary. You get to learn and get paid. Not so bad.

Janice Lea


#17

I have truly enjoyed this thread. A half a days work is a 12 hour
day. I live in the middle of no where with almost no population.
Nearest town with a population is Green Bay Wisconsin and it’s 30
miles away. I work my brains out. When I am not physically running my
business I am reading a tutorial to learn a technique. Have not
taking a vacation in three years and have worked pretty much everyday
since the end of last summer… weekends andholidays, no days off. I
get up at 5am. On weekends or holidays I do things I need to do
before the rest of my family is up and going and then even finish up
at night. Someone gave me a novel to read. I said I don’t have time
to read fiction. I have too much to learn. I really do not say no to
anyone. It’s my job to say, ‘Yes, I can do that for you.’ I do
repairs for a few stores. I have an online supply shop that is
amazingly successful to my surprise. I make custom jewelry which is
probably half my business. I makethings I love to make and then sell
them in an online shop which again is success to my surprise (read
about SEO if your online shop has no sales.) My own creations are a
small part of my work because the rest has to get done first. The
rest is bread and butter. I fixed some maple syrup machine the other
day. That was a first. Ido a few art shows in the summer and teach a
little bit. I love what I do and I get to stay at home with my
children and now they even help. I make agood living. Could I do it
without my spouse? It would be really hard. HEATH INSURANCE is a
doozy. We both run our own businesses and our health insurance is
like a mortgage. Our deductible is $10,000. We make a conscious
effort to stay healthy and trim to stay out of the doctors office. If
I did not have a husband I would have to have a roommate. I do love
what I do. I enjoy every single minute of it even when I’m
frustrated. Jeez, I dream about making stuff. Could I go back to
working a job with a schedule? Probably not (I am actually an RN.) I
have worked at home for 12 years andI don’t think I could go back to
a corporate rule book. So I work at home and work hard and take it
day by day. I praise my customer for thinking of me in the sticks!
and making it possible for me to do what I do and stay alive. I am
taking a vacation this year, Yippeee! I think my hands will be bored.
:wink: joy kruse


#18
Someone gave me a novel to read. I said I don't have time to read
fiction. I have too much to learn. 

Joy, if you haven’t you should give audio books a try. I love being
read to while I work. Some of the narrators are really fantastic.

Mark


#19

I have made my living working on jewelry in a small studio and
constantly learning, and teaching myself jewelry techniques. I did
that for about 40 years. I mastered, lost wax casting, sand casting,
hammering gold and silver jewelry from ingots, granulation,
reticulation, mokume’ gane’all kinds of stone setting, lapidary. I
can pretty much make anything. Now I spend most days painting
pictures, which is what I have wanted to do all my life. I listen to
books and movies while I work on my iPad.

Michael


#20
you should give audio books a try. I love being read to while I
work. 

Mark - What I fantastic idea. I never would have thought of that!
Being read to while I work. I would enjoy that. Thanks! :slight_smile: joy