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Jewelry Design on Compu


#1

Reply to: RE>>Jewelry Design on Comput

Hi Jeffrey,

Thanks for the advise on stereo lithography.

I’m trying to understand the overall process of going from the design on
computer to finished piece. I think if you could step me through your
process I would get a foundation to proceed from.

Let’s say you are creating a simple 2-D item, can you walk through the steps
that you take to get from design on computer to finished product? Elaborate
on the photopolymer process and its limitations. Could you also describe your
process for a 3-D item? I think you are using a metal mold process for 3-D
items and a photopolymer process for 2-D items, am I correct?

Just for clarity, would you define a 2-D item?

Thanks,

Steve McCarthy

Hi Steven

I think you’ll want to steer away from stereo lithography for jewelry,
the photopolymer is too ineffecient to cast and it’s not accurate
enough. I HIGHLY recommend you look into the Sanders Prototyping Desktop
Modeler. It uses an inkjet type system to build up wax models in 3-d
space. It costs about $55K and I WANT ONE. :slight_smile: You can check it ou at
Gold Machinery’s web site. http://www.goldmach.com


#2

Steve McCarthy wrote:

    Reply to:   RE>>Jewelry Design on Comput

Hi Jeffrey,

Thanks for the advise on stereo lithography.

I’m trying to understand the overall process of going from the design on
computer to finished piece. I think if you could step me through your
process I would get a foundation to proceed from.

Let’s say you are creating a simple 2-D item, can you walk through the steps
that you take to get from design on computer to finished product? Elaborate
on the photopolymer process and its limitations. Could you also describe your
process for a 3-D item? I think you are using a metal mold process for 3-D
items and a photopolymer process for 2-D items, am I correct?

Just for clarity, would you define a 2-D item?

Thanks,

Steve McCarthy

Hi Steven

I think you’ll want to steer away from stereo lithography for jewelry,
the photopolymer is too ineffecient to cast and it’s not accurate
enough. I HIGHLY recommend you look into the Sanders Prototyping Desktop
Modeler. It uses an inkjet type system to build up wax models in 3-d
space. It costs about $55K and I WANT ONE. :slight_smile: You can check it ou at
Gold Machinery’s web site. http://www.goldmach.com

orchid@ganoksin.com

Okay my thinking on this is that a person could build a machine to
carve waxes or metal. The necessary robot arms and servos are less than
$1000 complete with the computer program.So okay get a Cad program plus
a handpiece plus a few robot arms and it would seem to me a person could
make there own…add more than one flex shaft and make two or three
possibly different designs at once…Another thing I had thought of
was conversion of an old dot matrix printer’s mechanism to carve waxes
but I am not enough of a computer expert to make anything along these
lines…Anyone think there might be a cheaper way…Gesswein sells
computer and all for about $10,000 but never have spoken to anyone
actually running it…Gavin


#3

Okay my thinking on this is that a person could build a machine to
carve waxes or metal. The necessary robot arms and servos are less than
$1000 complete with the computer program.So okay get a Cad program plus
a handpiece plus a few robot arms and it would seem to me a person could
make there own…add more than one flex shaft and make two or three
possibly different designs at once…Another thing I had thought of
was conversion of an old dot matrix printer’s mechanism to carve waxes
but I am not enough of a computer expert to make anything along these
lines…Anyone think there might be a cheaper way…Gesswein sells
computer and all for about $10,000 but never have spoken to anyone
actually running it…Gavin

It seems simple enough until you actually start building one. You need
ridigity to cut metal, and any deflection at all will ruin your design.
I don’t think you’ll be able to find a decent set of ways and acme ball
screws (let alone recirculating ball screws) for under a thousand
dollars, a good set costs about 3K. and you need one for each axis.
Ink jet, not dot matrix, Sander Prototyping did just that, and it costs
$55,000.
Yes Gesswein sells a Light Machines 3 axis mill, MasterCam software, and
a computer to boot, for $65,000. I’ll sell the same thing for less and
make a healthy profit! :slight_smile:
I started out thinking along the sames lines Gavin, and eventually just
went out and bought a mill, it was sooo much easier, and the amount of
time it would have taken me to build one would have cost me far more in
the amount of lost work.

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#4

Steve McCarthy wrote:

Hi Jeffrey,

Thanks for the advise on stereo lithography.

I’m trying to understand the overall process of going from the design on
computer to finished piece. I think if you could step me through your
process I would get a foundation to proceed from.

This is exactly what I’m writing a book about, how to go from a design,
either hand or computer drawn to a finished piece of jewelry.

Let’s say you are creating a simple 2-D item, can you walk through the steps
that you take to get from design on computer to finished product?

A simple 2-D design, a flat backed object with a recessed area defining
design, lettering and the like, could be pierced out. I spent years
developing photopolymer techniques for producing 2-D patterns for
casting in metal. The process goes like this for photopolymers:

Once your computer assisted design is finished, you can do two thing

(1) print your drawing at about 400% and take it to a photo shop that
can reduce it 25% (for sharpness and smoothness) as a film negative.
(2) send your file via modem or hand deliver it to a service bureau than
can produce a film negative (usually Linotronic) at 2400 dpi which is
great for photopolymer etching.

Use the negative as a mask for generating the photopolymer pattern.
etc…

Elaborate
on the photopolymer process and its limitations. Could you also describe your
process for a 3-D item? I think you are using a metal mold process for 3-D
items and a photopolymer process for 2-D items, am I correct?

With photopolymer or magnesium printing media, you are limited to
(usually) a single etch depth, very fine detail is lost or very shallow
and disappears when finishing. Casting is much the same as with wax with
some fundemental differences. The photopolymer expands and boils and can
break down the investment, so you need an investment that will withstand
that. I suggest ringleww casting investment sold through dental
suppliers, you’ll need a solution that will dissolve the investment
caught in the details, I forget the name right now, your dental supplier
can tell you. The photopolymer can also be attacked by the steam
generated during the initial phases of the burnout process causing loss
of detail and other complications. I did some pretty amazing things with
photopolymers involving pierced-out lettering especially. Unfortunately,
I don’t have the time right now to get into an in-depth discussion.

Just for clarity, would you define a 2-D item?

See Above

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#5

Jeffrey Everett wrote:

Steve McCarthy wrote:

Hi Jeffrey,

Thanks for the advise on stereo lithography.

I’m trying to understand the overall process of going from the design on
computer to finished piece. I think if you could step me through your
process I would get a foundation to proceed from.

This is exactly what I’m writing a book about, how to go from a design,
either hand or computer drawn to a finished piece of jewelry.

Let’s say you are creating a simple 2-D item, can you walk through the steps
that you take to get from design on computer to finished product?

A simple 2-D design, a flat backed object with a recessed area defining
design, lettering and the like, could be pierced out. I spent years
developing photopolymer techniques for producing 2-D patterns for
casting in metal. The process goes like this for photopolymers:

Once your computer assisted design is finished, you can do two thing

(1) print your drawing at about 400% and take it to a photo shop that
can reduce it 25% (for sharpness and smoothness) as a film negative.
(2) send your file via modem or hand deliver it to a service bureau than
can produce a film negative (usually Linotronic) at 2400 dpi which is
great for photopolymer etching.

Use the negative as a mask for generating the photopolymer pattern.
etc…

Elaborate
on the photopolymer process and its limitations. Could you also describe your
process for a 3-D item? I think you are using a metal mold process for 3-D
items and a photopolymer process for 2-D items, am I correct?

With photopolymer or magnesium printing media, you are limited to
(usually) a single etch depth, very fine detail is lost or very shallow
and disappears when finishing. Casting is much the same as with wax with
some fundemental differences. The photopolymer expands and boils and can
break down the investment, so you need an investment that will withstand
that. I suggest ringleww casting investment sold through dental
suppliers, you’ll need a solution that will dissolve the investment
caught in the details, I forget the name right now, your dental supplier
can tell you. The photopolymer can also be attacked by the steam
generated during the initial phases of the burnout process causing loss
of detail and other complications. I did some pretty amazing things with
photopolymers involving pierced-out lettering especially. Unfortunately,
I don’t have the time right now to get into an in-depth discussion.

Just for clarity, would you define a 2-D item?

See Above

             Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250

orchid@ganoksin.com

You can perhaps minimize the damage to the investment by going to 900
degrees right away and I have had good results when burning out plastics
this way many times…Gavin


#6

The name Gesswein has shown up on this list a few times recently, but I
haven’t seen anyone else post their e-mail address:

gessweinco@aol.com

If Gesswein has a web site, I haven’t been able to find it. If anyone has
better info than me, please share it with the list.

Disclaimer: neither I nor Maxon’s has any financial connection with
Gesswein, but our bench guy does buy from them frequently.

Joel Kahn <@Joel_Kahn>
Comptroller for Maxon’s Jewelers
Diamond Merchants & Estate Jewelers
Authorized Dealer for Rolex & Tag Heuer
2622 S Glenstone, Springfield Missouri 65804 USA
Voice: 417-887-1800 or 417-887-1809
Fax: 417-887-3422


#7

Joel,
Have purchased most of my “New” ‘Stuff’ from “Whoever”-- Gess… (You know
I can’t Type!!!)… Good Company relative to satisfaction with
stuff… never had a recall, so can’t say more… can look at the catalog
for possible Internet ID if required… Every one can get a 'NEW’
Catalog … What’s the problem!!!..???

Joel( Still doing the 3-D 'Thing, hopefully, + news, next week !!!

Da Jim

At 07:29 AM 10/15/96 -0500, you wrote: