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Japanese Chasing Hammers


#1

Hello everyone! When I was in college there was a wonderful hammer
that the jewelry lab had. It was a Japanese chasing hammer, however,
no one knew where it came from, thus no one knew where to get it. My
question is, does any one know where I can purchase a japanese
chasing hammer in the States or online? Thank you for any help or
knowledge.

Anastasia Macdonald


#2
that the jewelry lab had. It was a Japanese chasing hammer, 

Uh, could you describe the hammer?

Check http://www.leevalley.com, they carry a lot of Japanese tools.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#3

hey!

well, i am worried about suggesting this, but since i know she is a
caring person and teacher, i suggest contacting lori talcott for info
on this. i have a japanese chasing/engraving hammer that i got form
one of her fabulous classes, and i know she knows where to get them.
however, i also feel i must point out that the main difference
between the japanese chasing hammer i have and other hammers is
purely the way it is weighted…besides of course the cool way it
looks. so…if you are unable to find lori, as she travels a bunch,
perhaps you can experiment with differently weighted european/us made
hammers. :slight_smile:

joanna


#4

Anastasia,

Allcraft in NYC sells them, although they’re not always in stock.
Give them a call.

Doug

Douglas Zaruba
16639 Raven Rock Rd.
Sabillasville, MD 21780
301 241-3494
@Douglas_Zaruba


#5
    It was a Japanese chasing hammer, however, no one knew where
it came from, thus no one knew where to get it. My question is,
does any one know where I can purchase a japanese chasing hammer in
the States or online? Thank you for any help or knowledge. 

Might want to try the Japan Woodworker in Alameda, CA 800.537.7820 or
japanwoodworker.com. I don’t know if they would have it but they have
a catalog and have always found the people really helpful. (I don’t
work for them nor do I have friends or family working there. Just
someone who enjoys visiting and making minor purchases when I visit
back home.)

Delane Cooper


#6

I have been selling tools for the past 30 years yet to see a
Japanese Chasing hammer. We sold French Chasing hammers to Japanese
Tool dealers. So I would be very interested in seeing one made in
Japan. Like to know if the hammer face had flat sharp edges.

I think it could have come from Europe as the origin of the Chasing
hammer is France. The best of them were made by a company called FMX.
The hammer face edge was rounded so as not to mar the working
surface.

Should post an image may be we can reproduce these.

Kenneth Singh
46 Jewelry Supply Inc
46 West 46 St
New York, NY 10036


#7
It was a Japanese chasing hammer, however, no one knew where it
came from, thus no one knew where to get it. My question is, does
any one know where I can purchase a japanese chasing hammer in the
States or online?

bill fiorni (Koka )used to make some Japanese style chasing hammers
– he may be importing some now:

http://www.mwt.net/~bkmetal/Billhome.html

http://www.repoussetools.com/koka/repousse_hammer_page.htm

you might check Hida in Berkeley

http://www.hidatool.com

http://www.artmetal.com/brambush/forging/proj04/index.htm

jesse


#8

Marcia Lewis ( http://www.chasingmetal.com ) did study in Japan. She
has mentioned this in her courses. She did not mention any thing
about the hammers from Japan but did discuss treatment of the punch
faces.

From pictures of Japanese chasers at work – They use a large number
of punches and some hammers ( not all) seem to take the form some
Japanese forging hammers with one offset head such as those here

http://www.mwt.net/~bkmetal/Billhome.html

Otherwise the hammers seem to be more typical of chasing hammers see

http:// www.nihon-kogeikai.com/TEBIKI-E/4.html

a huge very worthwile file – wait to see all the photos- I didn’t at
first - not the typical european ones with a flat face and a small
balled one. You can find some other very small photos with google and
in

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/087011798X.htm

not enough to buy for chasing alone. I am in no way an authority on
this.

jesse


#9
bill fiorni (Koka )used to make some Japanese style chasing hammers
-- he may be importing some now:
http://www.mwt.net/~bkmetal/Billhome.html 

That forging hammer that is sideways is sure interesting. There no
mention of price or weight.

marilyn


#10

Hi Noel,

I don’t know if the orchid digest mis printed your advice on
tempering chasing tools, but you seem to have missed out the steel
hardening section. Tempering is a process of softening the steel tip
down after hardening.

Here is my method

  1. anneal the steel to a cherry red and let cool slowly on the
    firebrick

  2. form, or shape the tool, then clean it up and polish it

  3. re harden the tool by annealing the working tip to cherry red and
    quenching immediately in oil or water.

  4. re emery paper the tool and polish it so that you can see the
    temper colours easy

  5. use a small flame just below the tip of the tool and heat until
    the colors appear, heat gently until your required temper colour hits
    the tip, then quench quickly to hold that temper, then a final
    polish.

I hope you don’t mind me adding a bit to your advice Noel.

Best regards James
James Miller FIPG in the UK