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Inlaid bezels


#1

This is one of those annoying things I haven’t mastered yet and
could use some input here. ONce in awhile I make thick bezels
that just frame a stone, basically inlaying the stone in the
frame with epoxy. I know enough to file notches in the bezel so
it will bend into an “L” shape then solder the notch. So I end up
with two “L’s” then position them to fit the stone perfectly.
This is where i get into trouble. I haven’t yet figured a
foolproof way to hold down the two pieces on a charcoal block so
that I end up with a perfect fit around the stone. Usually I drop
the stone in and then try not to move the pieces and hold them
with straight pins. But when removing the stone the pieces always
shift and its difficult to position the pieces perfectly again.
Any suggestions? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#2

Dave Stephens wrote:

…But when removing the stone the pieces always
shift and its difficult to position the pieces perfectly again.
Any suggestions? Dave

There are a couple of things that you might do. Set everything
up on a charcoal block, measure with a pair of callipers and
solder only one corner. Clean it up then check using your stone.
If it doesn’t fit just right you can remelt the joint and move
it one way or the other. Finally when you have the proper fit,
solder the other corner. Another thing you might do is to use
slightly heavier stock, make the bezel slightly small and file it
to size after soldering. Steve Brixner


#3

Dave, Use binding wire around the outside of the two “L” shapes
you have made to hold the pieces together. Also make your "L’"
shapes a little longer than you need and notch the ends so the
shape will not move during soldering. Just file off the excess
material when you are finished soldering. Steve Allison


#4

Dave, We have a way.It is a device called an electro-tacker.It
uses an electric current to make a weak weld between peices.The
weld is easily broken.This lets you position the peices
precisely.Then you solder them.Since it is a weld, it does not
shift when soldering.This allows us to assemble large numbers of
small parts without fear of them shifting as we work on the
peice.
Scott Hepner


#5

I haven’t yet figured a foolproof way to hold down the two pieces
on a charcoal block so that I end up with a perfect fit around
the stone. Usually I drop the stone in and then try not to move
the pieces and hold them with straight pins. But when removing
the stone the pieces always shift and its difficult to position
the pieces perfectly again.

Hi Dave, You could try to pin them down with steel needles, the
ends bent into a right angle or an uneven u-shape, the longer
shank pinned into the charcoal touching the bezel, the angle or
short shank over the upper edge of the bezel. Use a piece of
soft wax to place and remove the stone. Markus


#6

I haven’t yet figured a foolproof way to hold down the two pieces
on a charcoal block so that I end up with a perfect fit around
the stone. Usually I drop the stone in and then try not to move
the pieces and hold them with straight pins. But when removing
the stone the pieces always shift and its difficult to position
the pieces perfectly again.

Hi Dave, You could try to pin them down with steel needles, the
ends bent into a right angle or an uneven u-shape, the longer
shank pinned into the charcoal touching the bezel, the angle or
short shank over the upper edge of the bezel. Use a piece of
soft wax to place and remove the stone. Markus


#7

I haven’t yet figured a foolproof way to hold down the two pieces
on a charcoal block so that I end up with a perfect fit around
the stone.

I forgot to mention my tried and true and proven high tech
technique.

I use a staple gun. I staple the pieces to the charcoal block.

Hey, it works…

JE