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[Info needed] Brass and copper


#1

hello , I neede to know if brass and copper are good if being used
as jewelry , and does it make any problem with the skin or do we
have to reat it befor , and thanx in advance


#2

Many people believe that copper has a theraputic quality for the
treatment of arthritis. Copper and brass will in time, depending on
the persons chemistry, leave a green/black mark on the skin from
oxidization. I don’t know what one should coat items with in order
to prevent the oxidization process. It is, however, not harmful. I
wouldn’t suggest it for use on earrings or items that will be close
to more sensitive areas of skin. I hope this info was helpful.

Gary


#3
Many people believe that copper has a theraputic quality for the
treatment of arthritis.  Copper and brass will in time, depending on
the persons chemistry, leave a green/black mark on the skin from
oxidization. 

G’day; whilst I don’t want to get into the realms of scientific
medicine v. folk medicine, I should mention that the stain produced
by copper and brass on flesh is not really oxidation, although that
may come into the equation later. Perspiration contains a wide
variety of substances, from common salt (sodium chloride) to fatty
acids; and a whole swag of other things. The action of salt on copper
will produce copper chloride. Some of the fatty acids include
acetic, butyric, propionic, and others and all of these react with
copper metal. Then there’s all the products made by bacteria
enjoying the warmth and moisture under copper and brass jewellery, a
very large number of which react with the metal. As to whether these
are harmful or not, I cannot say. Human skin is purported to be a
one way material, but some things can and do get in and react with
body fluids. It is the reaction of copper and the copper in brass
with the body to produce substances soluble in body fluids which
might cause problems.

Whatever one uses in the way of lacers and varnishes on jewellery,
will not last long, and will soon wear off. Which is why the ‘noble’
(precious) metals have lasted over the millennia as jewellery
materials.

Cheers for now,
John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#4

Mazen, I work almost entirely in brass, copper, and nickel-silver
because I enjoy making larger jewelry pieces and the cost of the
material in base metals is negligible. It also has the advantages
of making experimentation a lot of fun, and the three contrasting
colors of the metals can be used in designing.

If I did this full-time, I could probably make a modest living at it,
but, fortunately, I do not have to! I find that my best customers
are the same people who can buy much more expensive things but who
appreciate finding modestly-priced pieces as well. (My customers
often tell me I should raise my prices! I do, but I also remember
the days before I made jewelry when I couldn’t find anything I liked,
and if I did, I couldn’t afford it.) Such customers also appreciate
interesting and whimsical designs.

Of course, base metals go “off” in humid weather. I do not lacquer
my pieces because it will only wear off in places, leaving a
patchy-looking piece. More and more, I chemically “oxidize” my
jewelry (using, e.g., Jax Black), which produces nice shadows on the
surface and prevents much further oxidation. I offer my customers a
free list of suggestions for easily cleaning base metal jewelry.

HTH (Hope This Helps)
Judy Bjorkman