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Influence of poison on silverware design


#1

We often use things surrounding us without much thinking of their
origin, and why they are this, or that particular way. I have always
been interested in old techniques and very frequently the best way
to decipher a manufacturing method is to understand the reasons
behind it. Silverware design in general and shape of drinking
vessels in particular, is an area of exploration of this writing…

Read full article:
http://leonidsurpin.ganoksin.com/blogs/2010/03/06/


#2

Leonid,

Thank you for this It is absolutely fascinating! The
photos of goblets present art work I have never seen and am thrilled
to see. Do you know where the goblets pictured that still exist are
now housed?

One of the benefits of Orchid, IMO, is the from artists
from different education and cultural backgrounds. Methods may change
but there is always something to learn in different processes.

Gratefully,
Mary A


#3

Leonid,

We often use things surrounding us without much thinking of their
origin, and why they are this, or that particular way. I have
always been interested in old techniques and very frequently the
best way to decipher a manufacturing method is to understand the
reasons behind it. Silverware design in general and shape of
drinking vessels in particular, is an area of exploration of this
writing.... 

Then you should know the real reason why a Cellar Master would have
a silver vessel to check the wine. Seeing as you did not mention a
"Tastevin" by name, I figured I would point you in the right
direction.

Have you ever eaten in a fine restaraunt where the Sommelier might
actually wear one of these around his neck?

Nothing to do with poison by the way.

Very Best Regards.
Neil George


#4
Do you know where the goblets pictured that still exist are now
housed? 

They used to be a part of main exhibition of the Armory in Kremlin.
Most of it is presentation pieces to Russian Tzars. I am sure they
still their, but may or may not be displayed.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#5
Have you ever eaten in a fine restaraunt where the Sommelier might
actually wear one of these around his neck? 

This whole discussion started with my mentioning tastevin. And
original intend of them was to indicate presence of poison, but I do
not want to restart the discussion, so please no responses to that
one.

As far as restaurants, if I would walk in a restaurant and saw
someone wearing this thing, I would leave. There are no reason for it
now, and I do not like gimmicks. Good restaurants do not have to
resort to cheap tricks.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#6

Leonid,

This whole discussion started with my mentioning tastevin. And
original intend of them was to indicate presence of poison, but I
do not want to restart the discussion, so please no responses to
that one 

Ok I will not mention poison :slight_smile:

However, if you knew anything about wine and the necessary
preservatives required to age a wine, then you would fully comprehend
where there might be a very good chance as to why a tastevin would
turn black.

Further to the point. Sulphur candles where used to seal and
sterilize oak barrels to prevent oxygen from entering the solution.
Another reason why a silver tastevin could turn black.

As far as restaurants, if I would walk in a restaurant and saw
someone wearing this thing, I would leave. There are no reason for
it now, and I do not like gimmicks. Good restaurants do not have to
resort to cheap tricks. 

Cheap tricks?. A Master Sommelier is worth his weight in gold in
pairing fine wine with food. That individual is the one who will
assemble a fine wine list for a restaraunt.

The tastevin is not used to impress you, it’s a mark of respect to
those who have travelled the road before them. Look up how many
Master Sommeliers there are worldwide, and you will see that they
are quite rare in comparison to lets say a master plumber :slight_smile:

Best Regards.
Neil George