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[Improve Content] Please be a bit more international


#1

Hello everybody,

It is often difficult to follow what some people are saying, for
instance what is Pewter sheet. Please try to be more international in
mentioning materials, dimension according ISO. Or if you don’t want to
do this, or have some lack of knowledge, give at least an extension.
Not only 40 degrees, but say Fahrenheit or Celsius. Than also other
people in other countries know what you are talking about. We have to
overcome first a language problem than we have to recalculate. You
know why the voyager projects to mars have failed. One group was
calculating according ISO in N/mm2 and some old fashion Americans in
Pound per square Inch. and they forgot to look at extensions.

Martin Niemeijer

( A Dutchman who hates gauche, Pounds, Fahrenheit so on. Dit you know
that even English people work according International standards.)


#2

Thanks Martin,

Yes, it’s always a chore and a worry to have to convert the
’imperial’ to metric and the US to the international. Thanks for your
reminder about this common Net problem in this the most international
of jewellery/jewelry fora.

Brian
(16 deg ourside today) :wink:
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r
http://www.adam.co.nz/


#3
Dit you know that even English people work according International
standards.)  

Yes but we still think in inches and fahrenheit - it’ll take another
60 years to change that. Andy (metricated for 33 years and it still
hurts)

Andy Parker, Agate House Lapidary
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
@Andy_Parker
www.agatehouse.co.uk
Tel: 01229 584023


#4

Brian, Is that 16 degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius ??? It’s true that we
Americans assume that since everyone communicates in English they must
also communicate with our standards of measure. We’ve been fighting
the more logical/uniform metric system for years. I am grateful for
the global input. I’m sure we can all give a little and learn alot.
Martin, thanks for the reminder! Patty (from Alabama where the
dogwoods are in full bloom)


#5

Hi Martin!

I certainly see your point about communicating in a way that people
will be able to understand in different parts of the world. I am in
favor of giving translations of measurements, etc, where possible.
But, speaking as a human being, (I have trouble speaking as a
chipmunk, although it’s fun trying! [On this note, check out
http://www.hamsterdance.com ]) I feel very strongly that often the
things that make us different are precious just as our similarities
are. I feel a little sad when I travel to different parts of the U.S.
and I see the same old chain stores that I left behind in New York,
and I really yearn to see different sights and meet different kinds of
people from those I know from home, and I am pleased when I do. Often
the quirky elements of a particular culture - language, decoration,
clothing, art, architechture, legends, customs, even feet and inches,
tell interesting stories about the history of a particular place and
the people who live there, if we look a little more deeply into them.
I think it would really be a shame if we all did things the same way.
As the world keeps shrinking, I think people will give increasingly
more thought to preserving the unique elements of their oun cultures,
and I hope that this happens in a way that incorporates respect and
appreciation for the wonderful variety of ways of doing things of
people around the world. (I hereby officially exclude - as a matter
of conscience - practices which harm people or animals!)

Anyhow, I had better get going, I have a bushel of work to do, and
all my excuses won’t be worth a farthing 'cause a miss is as good as a
kilometer, and I’ve just been centimetering along all day. :o) - Dan


#6

G’day all; We in New Zealand changed from the British Imperial system
well before the British did - but we oldies also still think in
miles, etc. I was brought up in laboratories where measurements of
weight, volume, temperature have long been metric, even in England.
So I still think of room and body temperatures as degrees F but
melting and boiling points in Centigrade - not even Celsius, although
they are (for most purposes) the same. Distances in miles and time,
but speeds in Kilometres per hour! I have a litre of pickle but a
gallon of water and a 6000 gallon rain water tank under the patio!!! As
we would say were I still in London, 'proper bloody mess, ain’t ‘e?’ –

	John Burgess;   @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ

#7

To Patty from Alabama, Ron from California and all and sundry
worshippers of the True Metric Faith: Andy from England is right.
Metric is NOT an intuitive measurement system. (Take heart Andy, if
the Brits haven’t killed off the Welsh and Irish despite a thousand
years of attempt they won’t have any better luck with the remaining
measurement traditionalists.) Aside from the fact that we, most of us
that is, have ten fingers and toes, there is no redeming value for the
use of a decimal system. In my opinion the rational ones of us who
insist on other measurement systems have nothing for which to be
ashamed.

Ten is only divisible by two integers, two and five and forms
fractions otherwise. On the other hand twelve is evenly divisible by
two, three, four and six, with an inch being customarily divided into
half, quarter, eight et cetera.

The human mind works to divide things into halves, et cetera and not
to calculate decimals and then try to remember the exponential
qualities. So while we may easily remember 3/8 of something we forget
and make mistakes when we have to calculate 0.375 of something. Place
holding becomes a major problem so when we calculate 4/3pixxxmm^
cubed we have no intuitive concept to tell us what is the proper
magnitude of answers in cm^cubed, just a string of zeros and a decimal
point somewhere in the middle…

Does anyone ever wonder why computer calculations sometimes don’t
work both ways doing metric/decimal calculations? This is because the
computer’s “mind” is patterned in a fashion after ours, recalling
things as a series of binary decisions. Any decimal number is merely
an approximation. This is recognized by assembly language programmers
who commonly use hexadecimal (base 16) to code. (It also takes a
significantly longer time for the computer to perform decimal
calculations.)

We need to mention but not dwell on the fact that when the eighteenth
century French were popularizing the Metric system (also trying to
stamp out other vestiges of tradition, killing people and burning the
history books) they miscalculated the basic length of the meter basing
it on a flawed estimate of the diameter of the earth. Trying to
correct things modern worshippers have recalculated the damned thing,
basing it on an odd number of wavelengths of a specific frequency of
light. Which of course has nothing whatsoever to do with intuitive
measurement, natural measurement nor measurement with easily
remembered fractions.

On the other hand the nautical mile, which was based on a specific
fraction of that diameter, happens to fit perfectly with trigonometric
calculations of distance traveled on the surface of the globe. We all
should know the derivation of the grain, the caret and the
pennyweight, so I won’t belabor them.

As Kipling once said “There are nine and sixty ways of constructing
tribal lays and every single one of them is right.” So I will
continue doing my calculations using the RIGHT system for the purpose
and ignore the ravings of the people who would have us all stamp out
everything in neat little Metric cookie cutter sameness.

G.


#8

Dear George, What a beautiful and erudite essay arguing for the status
quo! I am afraid, however, that it misses the point in the sense that
my argument supports the need for better and more efficient
communication amongst needlessly disparate parochial entities. As
long as people mindlessly cling to narrow points of view and choose
to battle with those who differ, we will continue to slaughter one
another in appalling warfare and the streets will run with blood.
Politicians have always exploited these provincial attitudes; they
are the basis for “divide and conquer” or, you might say, foment
discord and exploit. ( Yugoslavia, Ireland, Angola, Burundi,
Chechnya, etc. etc.) To borrow a popular cliche’ , “Frankly my dear,
I don’t give a damn” Any system of measure can work, but a thousand
systems at once are chaos and counter productive! Ta Ta, Ron at
Mills Gem, Los Osos, CA.


#9

Ron, Apologies for anything I wrote which would make you tense. I
feel obligated to point out that I was raised on metric, having seldom
used anything else in my day job. (I’m not a professional jeweler but
a dedicated hobbyist working towards competency so I can retire into
the business). Learning jewelry making I was initially surprised that
using the traditional weights and measures worked better for mental
calculations and started asking myself why.

It was at that point I started recalling many metric mistakes, all
dealing with its lack of intuitive value. Most of these were just
laboratory errors but I recall one instance where a gentleman died
because two doctors, a pharmacist, a nurse and a handful of students
all missed the fact that he’d been given a solution of potassium
measured in milligram per deciliter instead of millequivalents per
liter. (Or vice versa? Can you tell immediately which is the lethal
dose?) And NOBODY caught the mistake until the pathologist doing the
autopsy double checked on his calculator.

Yes, metric is a convenient way to measure stones, bezel wire and so
forth, but its superiority occurs primarily in keeping up with large
inventories and interchangable parts. Its efficient use gives
advantage to the high volume manufacturer who masters is sufficiently
to debug his processes. For the artist who hand rolls each bezel and
then cuts it to fit the individual stone it does nothing. (given of
course the fact that once tooling is complete there is no innate
superiority of metric over English)

It may be superior for the theoretician who wishes to calculate, say
the amount of grams alloy with specific gravity of 14.385 contained in
an 11.2 mm ID band of 1.75mm x 4.2mm plus a 2.5mm sprue of 10mm length
multiplied by 226 per flask times plus a 8mm x 80 mm central spue per
flask… but I challenge you to sit down and come up with the right
amount of metal needed quicker than you could by popping the prepared
tree onto your old pennyweight scale. And I challenge you to
intuitively know that your calculation is right without checking it
the old way unless this is a thing you do a dozen times per week.

Speaking as an artist who might make six dozen laboriously hand
carved, hand modeled castings per year, I don’t need mistakes based on
a calculation system which hasn’t been used and refined for a hundred
generations. And I really don’t care if Wal Mart or K Mart gains a ten
cent per casting compeditive advantage, allowing them to gain more
market share.

My final answer is that a chaotic system allows the small time
operator the chance to develop their own niche just as easily as does
an uniform system. And if that chaos turns out to be sand in the gears
of progress towards a global monolithic society, well, let us drop in
a little mud as well to make it stick harder.

Geo.


#10

G’day; I use both Imperial and decimal units for most things. I
hate apothecary’s measures, and pennyweights. But when I make a
cabinet I use none; I go back to the methods used by woodworkers long
before most of the methods were invented. I take a piece of thin
flat wood and mark one end with an arrow. I then mark off the length
of the sides, and write ‘Sides’ by the mark. I mark of width and write
that word alongside. And so on, and even mark off timber thickness’ so
I can allow for joints, etc. When all these dimensions are complete, I
write on the stick what it is for and who asked for it. Finally I
drill a hole at the non-arrow end from which I can hang it on a nail.
If you go into my workshop you will find a whole swag of these
measuring sticks hanging there. I don’t need drawings or rules. I
just mark off on the timbers and cut. No mistakes (Oh dear [read
!@#$%^&*] I must have used my Imperial instead of my metric measure!)
I was recently asked if I still had the sketches for a set of
kindergarten chairs and tables I made 10 years ago. It took me no more
than 60 seconds to find the stick, and I made replica kid’s furniture.

Jewellery? Forget measuring callipers and pi. I wrap a piece of
masking tape around a stone and cut it with a razor blade, then lay
the tape on a bit of wood. That’s the length of bezel wire I need +
the thickness of my metal. I place a piece of florist’s iron wire
around a wrist or finger or even neck, cut it, (the wire, not the
neck, silly) mark it off on a bit of wood. And so on.

I confuse easily, especially these days but I don’t confuse
measurements. However, if you want to make one of my chairs, I can’t
email you my measuring sticks; you’ll have to jump on an albatross or
something… Cheers,

John Burgess at Mapua, NZ.


#11

A supplier speaks:

Indian Jewelers Supply enjoys a great relationship with many
customers from Japan, Germany, Canada, Australia, and other
countries. A big thanks to these people outside the United States,
who propped us up when things were slumbering locally.

As to units of measure, we sell in the units we buy in. Cut stones
purchased by the carat are sold by the carat. Likewise for grams of
rough material, troy ounces of silver, pennyweights of gold, and
pounds of base metals. We reckon buyers are smart enough to consult
tables of conversion if needs be.

Dan Woodard, Indian Jewelers Supply Co.


#12

Having listened to this conversion . . .er . . .conversation for a
while now I feel obligated to insert my two bits. (and I challenge
you to define two bits) Having been raised in a mix of the two
systems, in modern schoolrooms of my day (I am 27) both side of this
argument were there to be learned. It is only in recent years that I
have come to a grasp of what fractions of an inch really are in terms
of size. . . and what a bloody reeking pain in the neck it has always
been to me. I still think in terms of miles per hour and that I am
5’7-1/4" tall. But I can figure faster with mm and cm than with 3/32"
and 1/64". Why? Ten fingers and ten toes. Now as to why America has
been so slow to adopt it? Easy. Those with money do not want their
factories having to spend all that cash re-tooling (especially
auto-makers). It would make things much simpler . . . ever tried to
stick an English bolt into a metric nut? Catastrophe on mis-threads
on mein VW engine.

Ben Silver


#13

G’day John! I feel that I have a kinship with you…I have enjoyed
your postings now for nearly a year and I find myself agreeing with
nearly everything you say. I especially relate to your latest posting
regarding woodworking and measuring habits. While I strongly espouse
the use of metric measurements in fabricating jewelry, I cling to the
old habit of using inches when working with lumber,largely because
our system of specifying dimensions for construction and
cabinetworking accord with the system of processing lumber, ergo,
inches. Furthermore, while I often use measurements to determine the
requirements of a given project, I too toss aside the ruler and use a
measuring stick. I never use a plan to make anything. I size up the
project, evaluate the possibilities within my lumber stash and
proceed to butcher the wood. I make all my own cabinets, benches and
fixtures. My favorite source of lumber is cast-off futon bed frames.
The Japanese appreciate quality lumber. The joy of creating wooden
artifacts is a marvelous antidote for the stress of setting stones.
Then too, wood is organic and each piece has its’ own identity and
feel. As for the rigors of quantification, I say to hell with it
whenever possible ! I never measure investment or water and it always
comes out perfectly. My burnout oven has a timer, but I never use it.
I start off with a slow heating rate until the wax melts out and then
turn over the flask and crank the hell out of the temperature gauge
until the top of the flask is glowing slightly red and has no color
residue. I really think that a blind person could go through the
whole casting and finishing process after a bit of practice and
coaching. Ta Ta! Ron at Mills Gem, Los Osos, CA. P.S. Let me
know when you come across a nice piece of Inanga jade…Cheers


#14
I recall one instance where a gentleman died because two doctors, a
pharmacist, a nurse and a handful of students all missed the fact
that he'd been given a solution of potassium measured in milligram
per deciliter instead of millequivalents per liter. (Or vice versa?
Can you tell immediately which is the lethal dose?) And NOBODY
caught the mistake until the pathologist doing the autopsy double
checked on his calculator. 

No, and they were both metric, so I don’t see your point here!
Couldn’t it have happened with apotecharies weights as well? And
hasn’t it?

       Yes, metric is a convenient way to measure stones, bezel
wire and so forth, but its superiority occurs primarily in keeping up
with large inventories and interchangable parts. 

Yes, and metric also is an easy way to measure thicknesses of plates
and diameters of wire. And by the way, when you have measured a wire

  • and not ‘guessed’ its proportion by a gauge measuring tool - it is
    very easy to calculate the weight or how long it will be if you pull
    it down to half the diametre. You wouldn’t be needing tables, - but
    indeed you have to learn how to calculate in the first place. What
    about calculating ring sizes? Easily done when you measure a ring to
    be e.g. size 54. It simply means inner circumference is 54 mm. I
    don’t understand how you go with your fancy numbers here. And - by
    the way - how do the English calculate their 'A’s and 'G’s etc?
   It may be superior for the theoretician who wishes to calculate,
say the amount of grams alloy with specific gravity of 14.385
contained in an 11.2 mm ID band of 1.75mm x 4.2mm plus a 2.5mm sprue
of 10mm length multiplied by 226 per flask times plus a 8mm x 80 mm
central spue per flask... but I challenge you to sit down and come
up with the right amount of metal needed quicker than you could by
popping the prepared tree onto your old pennyweight scale. And I
challenge you to intuitively know that your calculation is right
without checking it the old way unless this is a thing you do a
dozen times per week. 

Yes, here you are right, indeed it is easier to use the scale, be it
in grams or in pennyweights (whatever that is). So I don’t think any
’metrician’ would even consider calculating instead of weighing in
this case.

   Speaking as an artist who might make six dozen laboriously hand
carved, hand modeled castings per year, I don't need mistakes based
on a calculation system which hasn't been used and refined for a
hundred generations. And I really don't care if Wal Mart or K Mart
gains a ten cent per casting compeditive advantage, allowing them
to gain more market share. 

No. Okay. It certainly is up to you, but by the way, when your eyes
wear a little out and you want to use those very easily readable
electronic calipers, you will not have the possibility of reading
them in 1/8 or 1/128 parts of an inch, - but you will have to cope
with hundredths of a millimeter or thousands of an inch. Ho - ho.

   My final answer is that a chaotic system allows the small time
operator the chance to develop their own niche just as easily as
does an uniform system. And if that chaos turns out to be sand in
the gears of progress towards a global monolithic society, well, let
us drop in a little mud as well to make it stick harder. 

So, Geo, if you perfer a chaotic system, go on and use it, but
PLEASE, when you want to communicate worldwide, don’t stick to your
US/UK gauges and when you mention temperatures, tell us if it is F or
C. Please!!!

Kind regards
Niels L�vschal, Jyllinge, Denmark
@L_F8vschal
phone (+45) 46 78 89 94


#15

Hey Ben!

Two bits is a quarter dollar…but what is one bit? (The US, by the
way, was the first country in the world to adopt a metric system for
its currency.)

When I went to school (I’m 35) most Americans were incensed that the
rest of the world wanted us to convert to the metric system of
weights and measures. I think the prevailing theory was that the
metric system was a communist plot to confuse the US
Military-Industrial Complex. Either that, or it was an
Imperialist plot to destroy American Folk Music. "2.5 centimeters by
2.5 centimeters, row by row, I’m gonna make this garden grow…"
Peter, Paul & Mary would have been out on the street! Give 'em 2.5
centimeters and they’ll take 1.6129 kilometers! :wink:

There’s no longer any practical value in fighting this battle. Today
we have PDAs and calculators which can convert any unit of measurement
to any other unit of measurement in a few seconds. When I buy a pound
of lapidary rough I have no trouble determining the price per gram,
per kilo, per ounce, per carat or per grain. The incentive to choose
either one system or the other has been removed by the speed of the
microchip. :slight_smile: -Peter-


#16

Hello all I would like to add one little and small point about
measuring here. I have lived in the USA, and am a USA citizen, and
have lived in the UK. I have been a professional silversmith for over
10 years now, and have been working in metal for over 20… When I
finally “discovered” metric, I have to say it made my life a whole LOT
easier!!! One twelfth of an inch, vs one millimeter… and the
calipers in metric centimeters and millimeters allow for much easier
measurments for me, since I don’t have to sit around writing my
dimensions in fractions. It isn’t that it is any better or worse, or
more or less intuitive… For my trade and practices, it is just simply
more strait foward, doesn’t require as much time calculating and
figuring out and makeing everything have the same common denomonators,
and because of this it is increadable simple and strait foward. Now, I
currently life in the USA, and I tell people the measurments of my
final work be it a bird bath, a candle holder, or a service set, in
inches and feet… But I have to admit, when working in the studio,
my metric caliper is the most used tool in the studio… heck, I know my
inches, feet, and yards, and I know a meter, centi and mili… I know
temperature in C and in F… and depending on where I am, I swich…
but in the studio, almost all of my measuring of the actuall metal is
metric. (though my ring sizes are US standard for ease of trade)

Alex Austin
Austin Creations
PO Box 1109
Rimrock Az, 86335

(520) 567-3044
fax (520) 567-3345
www.austincreations.org


#17

G.,

I had to sit with this one for a while before I replied, lest my tone
be scornful. Hence, let me preface my reply with the statement that
I’ll defend your right to believe as you will but, as an engineer
[BSME & BSCS], I’m truly pleased that your belief is among the
minority.

To Patty from Alabama, Ron from California and all and sundry
 worshippers of the True Metric Faith: Andy from England is right.
 Metric is NOT an intuitive measurement system. 

Tell that to millions of engineers, scientists, etc., that use it
every day and would rather slit their wrists than be forced to use
the English system.

     (Take heart Andy, if the Brits haven't killed off the Welsh and
Irish despite a thousand years of attempt they won't have any better
luck with the remaining measurement traditionalists.)  Aside from
the fact that we, most of us that is, have ten fingers and toes,
there is no redeming value for the use of a decimal system. 

You mean, aside from the fact that our entire numbering system is
base-10!?

     In my opinion the rational ones of us who insist on other >
measurement systems have nothing for which to be ashamed. I don't

recall anyone saying that people who use the English measurement
system (a misnomer since we Americans are one of the few remaining
nations to use it) should be “ashamed.”

     Ten is only divisible by two integers, two and five and forms
fractions otherwise. On the other hand twelve is evenly divisible
by two, three, four and six, with an inch being customarily divided
into half, quarter, eight et cetera. 

If we follow this line of reasoning, then a natural improvement of
the system would be to use 60ths [divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6] or,
better yet, 420ths [divisible by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7] or …

     The human mind works to divide things into halves, et cetera
and not to calculate decimals and then try to remember the
exponential qualities. So while we may easily remember 3/8 of
something we forget and make mistakes when we have to calculate
0.375 of something. Place holding becomes a major problem so when we
calculate 4/3*pi*xxxmm^ cubed we have no intuitive concept to tell
us what is the proper magnitude of answers in cm^cubed, just a
string of zeros and a decimal point somewhere in the middle.. 

Out of curiosity, how do you perform calculations using pi without
using its decimal approximation or without decimals in your results?
How would you go about getting a usable figure for 3/7ths of a foot?
While expressing the result as 36/7ths inches is unquestionably
precise, it’s also far from intuitive or usable.

    Does anyone ever wonder why computer calculations sometimes
don't work both ways doing metric/decimal calculations? This is
because the computer's "mind" is patterned in a fashion after ours,
recalling things as a series of binary decisions. Any decimal number
is merely an approximation. This is recognized by assembly language
programmers who commonly use hexadecimal (base 16) to code. (It also
takes  a significantly longer time for the computer to perform
decimal calculations.) 

Binary code is not “patterned in a fashion after ours.” It’s
dictated by the fact that digital gates have only two states: on and
off. There’s also a reason why assembly is one of the least favorite
programming languages except in cases where the code needs to be as
compact as possible … it’s a pain in the $%^#^$, and anything but
"intuitive."

         We need to mention but not dwell on the fact that when the
eighteenth century French were popularizing the Metric system (also
trying to stamp out other vestiges of tradition, killing people and
burning the history books) they miscalculated the basic length of
the meter basing it on a flawed estimate of the diameter of the
earth. Trying to correct things modern worshippers have
recalculated the damned thing, basing it on an odd number of
wavelengths of a specific frequency of light. Which of course has
nothing whatsoever to do with intuitive measurement, natural
measurement nor measurement with easily remembered fractions. 

Defining measurements in terms of physical constants has nothing to
do with it being intuitive, it has to do with precision,
standardization and reproducibility.

     On the other hand the nautical mile, which was based on a
specific fraction of that diameter, happens to fit perfectly with
trigonometric calculations of distance traveled on the surface of
the globe. We all should know the derivation of the grain, the caret
and the pennyweight, so I won't belabor them. 

Why should we all “know the derivation of the grain, the caret and
the pennyweight”? I’d venture to say that, if you randomly polled
1000 people here in the US, even being charitable, less than 5% would
be able to accurately define the terms much less derive them. Those
measurements are simply not commonly used anymore except by a very few
industries. Likewise, the start of this thread was based on the
concept that, since most of the world uses Metric, our use of the
English system interferes with clear communication with the rest of
the world.

     As Kipling once said "There are nine and sixty ways of
constructing tribal lays and every single one of them is right."  So
I will continue doing my calculations using the RIGHT system for the
purpose and ignore the ravings of the people who would have us all
stamp out everything in neat little Metric cookie cutter sameness. 

In spite of my poking at the points of your argument, I rejoice in
our differences and, as I said earlier, will defend your right to
believe as you wish. I’m glad that it works for you.

Regards,
Shawn


#18

G’day; I had intended to let this matter drop and gently fade away,
but felt the urge to add a final word (from me) Imagine you are
making a chest of drawers with different drawer heights. So you have
to calculate at precisely what distance to put the runners up the
sides for the drawers. You also have to allow a little between each
drawer or they’ll jam. So you get nonsense like, (in inches) 10 1/2 +
1/2 + 8 9/16 + 1/2 + 4 19/32… Oh, gor blimey guv, where’s me
measuring stick?

Even without that; bring me my rule of burnished gold. Bring me my
calipers of desire. Bring me my square, O clouds unfold; Bring me my
chariot of fire. I shall not cease from mental strife, nor shall my
torch sleep in my hand, till I have builded here jewellery in
NooZillun’s green and pleasant land.

(Famous [well, sort of, only I mucked it about a bit] British
patriotic hymn sung with cathedral organ accompaniment by a chorus
of thousands every year in the Royal Albert Hall as a finale to the
Prom concerts) –

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#19

If I said that then it isn’t what I meant (language can be unhelpful
as well!). I just think it is ‘first learnt thing’ and will take
until everybody who ‘thinks’ in imperial measure to retire/die before
we have uniformity. Of course if the kids are still taught feet/inches
that could be a while. I believe we think in whatever measurement
system we are first taught. I have worked in metric measure for over
30 years but if you ask me how big a CD case is I’d say about 5" by 5"
because I think in imperial.

From a jewellery (there we go with language again) point of view I
don’t know a gauge from a penny weight and work in millimetres. But I
can still picture 25 thou or 16 thou spark plug gaps. Imperial can be
efficient - I worked with a quantity surveyor whose mental arithmetic
in base 12, 12 and 16 was as quick as anybody in base 10 - practice
and necessity.

That’s more than 2 'pennorth - I’ve gone!
Andy

Andy Parker, Agate House Lapidary
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
@Andy_Parker
www.agatehouse.co.uk
Tel: 01229 584023


#20

Hi, As a “Yank”, I was “raised” with the English System but I am also
a first generation American of German ancestry who ‘grew-up’ in a
house with both my U.S. born father (himself a first generation
’Ami’) and my German born Mom and Grandparents. Additionally I am a
Dental Tech by profession where we use metrics for measurements.
This dichotomy runs very deeply!!! My Oma would, by using x number
of grams of this and that along with x number of cups of y and z,
bake 4 dozen cookies. Get the picture? My Dad, a tool and die
maker, would swear at the metric system while spending $150 (metric $
system) to buy a micrometer that measured in inches only to express
the dimension in 64 ths of an inch which he promptly converted to
thousandths (!!!) to earn a paycheck measured in tenths of a dollar.
Go figure! Amazingly enough, I have no problem with the systems. I
just do not convert and I have no problem dealing in both systems
simultaneously and there you have my 3/64th’s or should I say my
.046875ths worth!!!:o)

Skip

Skip Meister
@Skip_Meister
Orchid Jewelry Listserve Member
A day without sunshine is like night!
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Five out of four people have trouble with fractions.