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I'm new to diamond jewelry


#1

Hi All,

I was introduced to this list by “Peter W. Rowe” admin at
rec.crafts.jewelry

I am a professional marketing consultant, but I am new to jewelry. I
need to know details for selling mid sized and big diamonds. Also
needed to know what customers generally look out for when buying
Diamond Jewelry, and the various questions they ask etc.

Since I am new to this industry I am eager to know all the little
things you all are already good at. Kindly please let me know if it
would be ok for you all if basic questions related to Jewelry and
Diamonds are introduced by me to the list.

Sincerely,
Ganesh J. Acharya


#2

Ganesh, By all means please do ask basic questions. I for one know
nothing about diamond jewelry, and the questions you ask and the
answers you receive from experts in that area will be most
informative for people who are unfamiliar with that aspect of
selling. Also, asking basic questions about jewely in general, is
always welcome.

Alma


#3
but I am new to jewelry. I need to know details for selling mid
sized and big diamonds. Also needed to know what customers
generally look out 

Ganesh, as Alma said, Ask Away…! Somebody here knows something
about anything ;}

Hmmmm. Mid-sized and big diamonds… You mean 2cts. to 35 cts. A one
carater is considered “average”. That’s a whole giant subject, but I
will say that the secret to selling 5 carat diamonds of quality is
simple - reputation and integrity. A great many of the truly "big"
diamonds are sold by Harry Winston, Cartier, etc. because people
don’t hand over a million dollars to someone they don’t know. Plus
there’s all the retail hand-holding and champagne and caviar that
goes with those houses…


#4

Boy, Ganesh, if that’s not the 64,000 dollar question! (That’s a
reference to a 1960’s TV game show here in the States) If you ever
get the answer to that question, write a book and you’ll make
millions!

Seriously, the best thing for you to do is to immerse yourself in
learning all you can about diamonds. This is a study that can last a
lifetime if you so desire. I would recommend the Gemological
Institute of America’s Diamond Course, for starters. GIA.com will
answer all of your questions concerning the course. It is offered as
a resident course in California and also as a correspondence course.
That would be step one.

Next or maybe concurrently, I would recommend that you get a job in
sales at a jewelry store or maybe with a diamond wholesaler. This is
really the only way to learn how to sell diamonds and diamond
jewelry, you must learn by doing.

Good luck and welcome to Orchid! Oh, and by the way, ask any
questions you want. That’s what Orchid is for.

Dave Phelps
precisionplatinumjewelry.com


#5
Seriously, the best thing for you to do is to immerse yourself in
learning all you can about diamonds. This is a study that can last
a lifetime if you so desire. I would recommend the Gemological
Institute of America's Diamond Course, for starters. GIA.com will
answer all of your questions concerning the course. It is offered
as a resident course in California and also as a correspondence
course. That would be step one. 

Thanks for the great info. I do have notes from my colleagues here
at my office. I’ve got a “Diamond Grading Manual - Lab Manual” from
GIA which I am referring to. I’ve also referred to various other
organizations’ grading manuals as well. But, the funny thing is none
of these follow the same standards. So, there seems so tbe lot of
ambiguity as far as the benchmarks are concerned. Also, the
benchmarks seem to vary a lot world wide.

Next or maybe concurrently, I would recommend that you get a job
in sales at a jewelry store or maybe with a diamond wholesaler.
This is really the only way to learn how to sell diamonds and
diamond jewelry, you must learn by doing. 

Currently I am responsible to sell these diamonds online. And the
biggest hurdle I’ve only seen these diamonds only on photographs. But
again I have to build a list of FAQs those are frequented. I am
wondering do you know anyone here who has already sold diamonds.


#6

Ganesh, I learned a great deal about what people want in stones
while I worked at Fast Fix Watch and Jewelry Repair. I’m sure if you
stopped by one of their counters when they are not busy, someone
working there would be happy to explain the diamond clarity and color
scales for you, and the about inclusions and color
teatments/heat treatments. I would go so far as to say that any
jewelry store that sells diamonds or diamond jewelry would be happy
to explain everything to you. Just make sure to wait and drop by
when no one is at the counter, or when someone working there looks
particularly bored.

Anna


#7
to explain everything to you. Just make sure to wait and drop by
when no one is at the counter, or when someone working there looks
particularly bored. 

Anna, that’s a great piece of advice, I would surely keep that one in
mind. Again you said you worked for a jewelry shop, and if you can
let us know what queries you encountered from customers it will be a
wealthy resource for all us here.


#8

Ganesh,

Currently I am responsible to sell these diamonds online. And the
biggest hurdle I've only seen these diamonds only on photographs.. 

None of my job descriptions had selling diamonds as a major feature,
mainly just a custom jeweller or bench jockie.

The only way to learn about diamonds is to handle them. Roll them in
your fingers, loupe the hell out of them etc. But pictures just won’t
work. Your fingers, loupe the hell out of them etc. But pictures
just won’t work. Your customers have looked at lots of pictures, you
have to be at least a step ahead of them.

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#9
The only way to learn about diamonds is to handle them. Roll them
in your fingers, loupe the hell out of them etc. But pictures just
won't work. Your fingers, loupe the hell out of them etc. But
pictures just won't work. Your customers have looked at lots of
pictures, you have to be at least a step ahead of them. 

That made me so weak! I’ve seen diamonds and other stones in real as
I belong to family of traditional Goldsmiths, but again I’ve not seen
the ones I am selling so far in real. All I have is a well presented
online catalog where anyone can order online.

Also, I will need to somehow find a way out to sell these, that’s my
job and there’s an inventory of over 60,000 diamonds. It is not
possible for me to see all of them in real. Also, the people I am
dealing with are well known for selling diamonds for decades.

Also, I’ve read the 4cs using GIA grading manual and I did understand
it a bit. The hurdle is where I start? From the experience I have, I
know there are buyers who specially look out for BIG stones and make
their fortunes with them. But, how do I find these people online and
that too in the US?


#10
Also, I've read the 4cs using GIA grading manual and I did
understand it a bit. The hurdle is where I start? 

Ganesh, A goldsmith, and successful diamond setter, and diamond
seller I knew (he died about two years ago) had a saying. “Knowledge
is power”. That’s the starting point.

You say you understand it “a bit”. so that’s where you start. “a
bit” is not enough. Either take the GIA diamonds courses, or find
equivalent and equally in depth training. The GIA courses can be
taken by correspondence from anywhere in the world, including India,
and are well worth every dollar they cost.

If you want to be a step ahead of your potential customers, to be
able to impress them, gain their trust, and sell to them, you have to
understand the subject in depth. You can’t do this very well in a bit
by bit, hit or miss fashion. You’ve been trying to get little bits as
you go, but you’re doing it like a blind man trying to find his way.
It’s the slow way. Take the courses. GIA isn’t the only one. The
British Gemological Association’s “FGA” training program is also
excellent. There may be others. But there are no good shortcuts
around doing it right in order to become the expert you need to be in
order to do what you wish. There’s no other good way to say it,
Ganesh. Take the courses. Gain the knowledge and understanding of the
subject, and become a properly trained expert in diamonds. If you do
that, with your family background and the contacts available to you,
I think you’ll then find that achieving your goals will fall right
into place.

The GIA courses, or others like them, offer an in depth
understanding of diamonds and other gems (personally, I think you
would benefit from the whole gemology program, not just the diamonds
courses, but the diamonds courses should be at least the minimum) You
learn not just how they are graded, by why they are graded that way.
You learn not just what the numbers on a certificate REALLY mean, but
you also learn what can not be known by just seeing a certificate.
This is true whether you’re trying to sell a single stone in your
hand to a customer sitting across the counter from you, or if you’re
at a computer terminal or on the phone trying to sell a stone in an
inventory list to a customer a thousand miles away. From that base of
real understanding will flow the knowledge of what’s important about
diamonds, what is NOT important, and how to gain the customer trust
that will sell the stone(s).

The courses are NOT difficult. Almost anyone can take them,
understand them, and complete them. The knowledge is out there in
other books too, but it’s difficult to know, before you learn it,
just what you need. The courses organize it, find the
background you otherwise wouldn’t have known to look for,
and will make sure that what you learn is the correct version of the
knowledge, rather than myths and hearsay and misconceptions and
mistaken traditions that can make the field confusing. And the
certificates you earn for completing the courses also can help assure
your customers that you do indeed know what you’re talking about.
Again, it’s the issue of them trusting you. Some of your past
postings, especially on rec.crafts.jewelry where I first “met” you,
or on your blog, have demonstrated my impression that you’re trying
hard to learn this but are running into obstacles and
mistaken impressions, and blind alleys. Learning like that, even with
the help of a wonderful group like Orchid, will take you a lot
longer, and won’t be as complete or work as well, as getting actual
formal training. If you were taking a trip on an airplane, would you
want a pilot who had properly complete flight school and gotten his
pilots license the right way, and had proper training and experience
flying the actual type of jet you were on, or would you be just as
happy with a pilot who’d learned to fly from Microsoft Flight
simulator (computer simulation/game) plus what a friend had told him
plus what he’s sort of managed to figure out on his own?

It’s pretty simple really. What you’re asking to be able to do, is to
become an expert, and highly successful in a field where you have
many competent competitors. If you want to compete with them, you
have to also become an expert just as many of them have done. Better
still, you have to become even more knowledgeable than they are.
Google may be powerful, and this group helpful, but they aren’t the
tools you really need. Formal training is.

Hope that helps.
Peter Rowe


#11

Ganesh,

That made me so weak! I've seen diamonds and other stones in real
as I belong to family of traditional Goldsmiths, but again I've not
seen the ones I am selling so far in real. 

It dosen’t matter how big the stones are, handle the 1 pointers and
the 5 ct ones. Nothing quite like reality. The 4 c’s and other stuff
has to be known, and you have to be able to identify them even
without letters after your name.

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#12
I will need to somehow find a way out to sell these, that's my job
and there's an inventory of over 60,000 diamonds. It is not
possible for me to see all of them in real. Also, I've read the 4cs
using GIA grading manual and I did understand it a bit. 

Forgive me for being blunt, and I’m not being personal, but unless
I’ve completely misunderstood what you’re saying, this job needs
someone with a great deal more experience in the diamond industry.
I’ve read about the four C’s over and over again in many different
books, and I understand it a lot, but I would not dream of applying
for a job where I was responsible to selling diamonds.

From what I gather, selling diamonds is quite a complex field of
expertise, which takes years to learn, and often centres around
family businesses, so that the skills are handed down from generation
to generation, with the youngsters growing up into the business.
That’s how long it takes to get a feel for it. I don’t think the
questions you’re asking can be answered on a forum like this. It
really is a business you need to immerse yourself into for a number
of years.

Are you personally responsible for grading and valuing these stones
or are they already done for you and you just have to market them?
Even then, you’d need to be able to answer customers’ queries about
the stones they wish to purchase, and chances are, many of your
customers might know more about diamonds than you do at the moment.
Rather than asking how you can sell the stones, perhaps some more
basic questions about what you don’t understand might be more helpful
to you. What is it about the four C’s you don’t understand?

Incidentally, does your company own the diamonds (in which case why
can’t you see and handle them), or are you trying to sell the same
inventory as many other online companies (which seems to be
happening a lot), such that whoever sells a stone first, then has to
order it in themselves from whoever owns it, before sending it on to
the customer?

Helen
UK


#13
Are you personally responsible for grading and valuing these stones
or are they already done for you and you just have to market them?
Even then, you'd need to be able to answer customers' queries about
the stones they wish to purchase, and chances are, many of your
customers might know more about diamonds than you do at the moment.
Rather than asking how you can sell the stones, perhaps some more
basic questions about what you don't understand might be more
helpful to you. What is it about the four C's you don't understand? 

Helen, that’s a good question you’ve asked. I do not certainly grade
or value the stones. I’ve been given a selling price, the photograph
of the stone, and a GIA lab report accompanied with each of the
diamond. So, majority of the work is already done for me. Now the
next hurdle for me is to identify buyers, and the reasons they buy
these stones.

Once I am aware of these 2 questions things would be easier for me.

I’ve already identified 1 big domain of buyers, that is, the
diamond-sellers themselves. The next step is to identify customers
who wear these diamonds, and other type of investors who are involved
in buying diamonds big time.

I do not have to study much about the diamonds as far as
diamond-sellers are concerned as I assume they are diamond experts
themselves.

What is it about the four C's you don't understand? 

The diamond grading manual is a big book. I’ve not done reading all
of it yet. Again all little things are pretty illustrated so I’ve
understood what ever they have mentioned.

I would like to know about perfect diamonds and their reflection
patterns.


#14
Incidentally, does your company own the diamonds (in which case
why can't you see and handle them), or are you trying to sell the
same inventory as many other online companies (which seems to be
happening a lot), such that whoever sells a stone first, then has
to order it in themselves from whoever owns it, before sending it
on to the customer? 

The main reason is we are marketing these from India and the main
company is in US. So, there’s no question of us handling these
diamonds. It is not that we cannot handle them. If required I can
certainly visit the diamond manufacturing unit here in India and see
these in real. But that would certainly not suffice the main problem.
“Identifying the buyers online” this currently, seems a tougher
problem right now in front of me than grading a diamond.


#15

I think I missed the first few post on the topic…

but If anybody is interested in selling diamonds as there own on
there web site there is a company out of Canada called polygon
(http://www.polygon.net) they do give out their whole database of
diamonds as a feed which I think is about million pieces.

Polygon is group of retail jewelers who are more into selling
jewelry and watches ( I know many of you are already members )

If you need to list colored Stones for sale on your web site email
me I know another company which does that too.

best regards

Ahmed Shareek
http://www.finegemsonline.com


#16

Dear All,

Sorry, I couldn’t resist. Forgive me for being too “light” or worse,
did I hear this one here?

Keep having fun guys, and for goodness sake, let’s all remember to
laugh,

Eve.

And there was the time Larry died. His will provided $100 000
for an elaborate funeral. 

At the funeral, as the last guests departed, the widow, Sarah,
turned to her oldest and dearest friend, Jodie, and said, "Well,
I'm sure Larry would have been be pleased with that." 

"I'm sure you're right," said Jodie. She then lowered her voice
and leaned in close. "How much did this really cost?" 

"All of it - all $100 000." 

"You can't be serious!" Jody exclaimed. 

Sarah said, "Well, the funeral was $9 000. I donated $1000 to
the church. The drinks and snacks came to $3 000. The rest went
for the memorial stone." 

Jodie computed quickly. "You spent $87 000 for a memorial stone?
For heaven's sake, how big is it?" 

"Five carats," said Sarah. 

Keep having fun guys, and for goodness sake, let's all remember
to laugh, 

Eve


#17
"Identifying the buyers online" this currently, seems a tougher
problem right now in front of me than grading a diamond. 

Ganesh, this is purely personal; but I would not deal with a person
whose only identity is a generic name.

KPK


#18

“Gems & Gemology”, the magazine published by GIA, published a series
of articles a few years back about diamonds and light. They published
articles on:

Brightness - Fall 2004 issue
Fire (Dispersion) - Fall 2004 issue
Scintillation - Fall 2004

There have been other articles that addressed diamonds and light as
well. You can find an index of Gems & Gemology articles for 1981-2008
here: http://tinyurl.com/yagsq9q

For further you can find Gems & Gemology contact
here: http://tinyurl.com/y8g6j4u

Mike DeBurgh, GJG
Henderson, NV