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Ideas on Lifting Tables for Booth Display


#1

Hello all -

I would like to lift my tables up 1-1.5 feet. The ones I am using
are folding tables with two U-shaped aluminum legs (at the ends) that
lock into place when opened.

Does anybody have any ideas about how to do this with minimal
weight.

I have looked at the archives and have not been able to find
anything so, apologies in advance if I missed something.

Any ideas are welcome.

Thanks -
Debby


#2

the most safe way would be to have a welder add some rod that is
split at the bottom ( an inverted y) and mitered to be level and
accept rubberized slip-on tips/ or coat in plasti-dip or a similar
product for waterproofing and skid resistance, to the legs-- to
raise,steady and add balanced support.Other contraptions are not as
sturdy,don’t follow the form of the legs and can be quite heavy and
add more to break down at the end of a show…A welder that can then
powder coat the legs is even better!

R.E.R.


#3

Debby,

I would like to lift my tables up 1-1.5 feet. The ones I am using
are folding tables with two U-shaped aluminum legs (at the ends)
that lock into place when opened. 

Get a piece of PVC pipe that is just large enough in diameter to
slip over the legs and cut four equal length pieces. First slide it
on and hold it all the way up against the cross piece, to measure how
far to cut to get the height you need, then make four of those. You
can get four end caps for the bottoms, to make it look somewhat
neater, and, incidentally, to keep from bringing home plugs of grass
from outdoor shows.

I had the same kind of table and that worked out well for me. If you
want to make it permanent you can put something in that will set up
around the leg (resin, glue, cement?), but it’s simpler to just
drill a very small hole through both and slip a nail or something
through it. That lets you disassemble it for transport.

Loren
http://www.golden-knots.com


#4

Hi Debby,

We made table leg extenders years ago… If your table legs are
hollow tubes… Go to your favorite home store and get PVC pipe
to fit INSIDE the legs. Make sure you push the pipe all the way in as
far as it will go. Saw the pipe off at your measured length to
create your desired height. Get some of those rubber protector feet
to fit over the bottom ends of the PVC pipe. You now have four new
"legs" that you can take out and carry with you when you need to
raise your table. You can also label the new legs and table legs say
1 thru 4 if you find that the table legs are a little different
inside from each other. I have two tables and two sets of legs. Been
using these for many years! Dab a little glue in the protector feet
before you stick them on the bottom of your pipes. Email me off list
if you have questions…

Karen


#5
I would like to lift my tables up 1-1.5 feet... Does anybody have
any ideas about how to do this with minimal weight. 

Absolutely, PVC pipes. Cut them to length such that they are the
added height you want, plus the height they will slide up your
current table leg. Make sure, too, that they are of a diameter that
will slip over the current table leg. I did that with my previous
setup, and I used 1-1/4" pipe. Depending on what your tables will be
sitting on, you might not want little circles being imprinted from
the pipe, or potential scratching caused by uneven pipe ends. To
avoid either of those situations, I duct-taped baby food jar lids to
the bottom of my pipes, but any such round, rounded-edged thing could
work.

Lisa
Designs by Lisa Gallagher
www.lisagallagher.com


#6

Hi Debbie. I have seen in catalogs a set of black plastic cone-like
risers to do just that. Sorry I can’t tell you where.

Allan Mason


#7

A very tall friend of mine showed me a trick for raising the height
of the table, using sturdy cardboard tubing cut into one foot
segments. Since we both sewed we had a number of thick cardboard
tubes 48" to 60" long, the sidewall was thicker than 3/8", that had
been used for fabric roll cores. They were easy to cut with a saw,
and the opening was large enough to slide over the end of the leg,
and the cardboard was stiff enough that they stopped at the bend in
the leg of the table. Using these tubes you can easily add 8 " to
the height of the table. If you can’t find cardboard PVC pipe would
probable work just as well, if you got the stiff kind.

Louise
Woodsholme Handworks


#8
Does anybody have any ideas about how to do this with minimal
weight. 

Many people use PVC pipe, cut to length, and jam them on the ends of
the legs. I don’t know how folks get them to stay, but I do know that
lots of people do it, either for shows or for a better work height
while standing.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#9

Hi,

I sue 4 pieces of Copper Pipe that fit at the bottom of the legs.
Just slip it on and it stays, rain or shine!

Best of Luck,

Vera
Vera Battemarco
Couture Artisan Jewelry ™


#10

The PVC pipe, 1.5", works great on my “Lifetime” tables. Very
sturdy. I cut them w/ a hacksaw.

Regards, Audie Beller


#11

A very simple way to raise a table is to cut lengths of PVC pipe that
fit closely around the legs of the table. Cut the pipe long enough to
slide up the leg to wherever it bends or runs into something that
will block the pipe. This system works best when there is enough
straight leg at the bottom to be stable with the PVC sleeve. I put
end fittings (like endcaps in PVC) on the bottom of the pipes. A
little flat black paint, and you’re on your way. Carry the pipes to a
show with you bound in that Velcro one-wrap or in a bag or box.


#12

Hello Debby,

Loren’s idea of the PV C pipe “boots” for the table legs is good.
However, if the legs fold in under the table, don’t permanently
affix the boots. You won’t be able to completely fold everything
flat.

Start with PVC pipe with an inner diameter as close to the table
legs as possible. Each pipe boot should be about 12 inches longer
than your increased leg length. Example: you want to add 12 inches -
12 inches + 12 inches = 24 inch long pipe boot.

After you glue a cap on the pipe boot, cut equal lengths (12" long)
of the next size smaller PVC pipe and drop the small pipe into the
larger pipe. Put the boots on the table legs and make sure you have
the correct height, and the table is level. Adjust as necessary. THEN
put some glue on the small pipe before you drop it into the larger
pipe, allow the glue to cure, and the boots are all in one piece.

Judy in Kansas


#13
I have seen in catalogs a set of black plastic cone-like risers to
do just that. Sorry I can't tell you where. 

I’ve seen such at Bed-Bath-& Beyond, online and Mall Stores.
Probably also at similar household specialty outlets? Cones and
blocks, white and Black (+?).

On the other hand, my first thought to this inquiry, was to think of
making a table sized, 6" - 8" tall riser, open only on the back, to
give a convenient, out of sight / mind, storage place, for POP
supplies and over stock, handy and out of sight, and rapidly packed
up after a show, ready for next time.

Ed


#14

I suppose the folks suggesting the PVC are also suggesting you get a
new table, since you’ve described your table legs as being a U shape
at the ends, and I’m picturing the two legs on each end being one
piece of tubing.

This being the case, PVC won’t work, and I can’t imagine a way to
make extenders that would be stable. The tables that you’re
descibing, in my experience, are cheap and wobbly to begin with. I
would invest in decent, lightweight folding tables, then the PVC
extenders will work great.

Charlie Wyckoff
Klamath Falls, Oregon
www.charlieschaincraft.com


#15
I have seen in catalogs a set of black plastic cone- like risers to
do just that. Sorry I can't tell you where. 

I had these in college to rise my bed up so I could store things
under it. They weren’t very high, though.

I would go the pvc route. They are very easy to cut with a simple
saw at the show incase you need to adjust. Easy, but messy!

Amery Carriere Designs
Romantic Jewelry with an Edge
www.amerycarriere.com


#16
I use 4 pieces of Copper Pipe that fit at the bottom of the legs. 

Have I lost my few remaining brain cells, or did the original poster
say she had tables with U-shaped legs? In which case, the 47 emails
saying to slide something tubular over them will not be much help!

I’m afraid I don’t have a solution-- just a reality check for my
sanity.

Noel


#17

I have a table with U shaped legs at the end and I use PVC. Make
sure it fits snugly on the legs, no wiggle room and it’s completely
sturdy. I even use the table in my studio when not at a show. it
works great.

My table is somewhat new, from Office Depot. I think I paid about
$50 for it. It’s cheaper for me to buy it than to rent it once at a
trade show. As long as I can drive to the show, I take my own table.

amery


#18

I know raising the table is so much easier on us, after 4 back
operations i sure understand that. when doing a show, however the
problem is disabled customers, and i know this because i’m in a
wheelchair, and as such, cannot easily see what is on a table. so i
just roll past. I feel like a little kid looking in a candy store
window…not a great feeling for an adult who tries to be self
sufficient.

i do get thru shows faster these days.

pat
http://imageevent.com/patmcaudel


#19

There seems to be some confusion about whether the U-shaped legs in
question are orientated in the normal way or an upturned U shape. If
they are an upturned U then the pvc pipe idea will obviously work
well but if they are in the shape of a normal U then pvc pipes or
pipes of any kind won’t work.

In the case of a normal U, would cutting grooves into some large
fire bricks or breeze blocks do the trick?

Helen


#20
problem is disabled customers, and i know this because i'm in a
wheelchair, and as such, cannot easily see what is on a table. so i
just roll past. 

What would be a good solution? Having one section that is lower?

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools on Metal Clay