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I have a weakness for bangle bracelets


#1

Hi Everyone!

I am a newbie, well I am a Goldsmith’s Apprentice, and I have a
weakness for making bangle bracelets. Does anyone know of different
twisted wire patterns that I can use??

Also too, does anyone have any tips on making an I.D. Band? I am
having a rather hard time.

Thanks,
Giancarlo.V.


#2

Giancarlo,

I am a newbie, well I am a Goldsmith's Apprentice, and I have a
weakness for making bangle bracelets. Does anyone know of
different twisted wire patterns that I can use?? 

Herbert Maryon (1864-1975) wrote a wonderful book, METALWORK AND
ENAMELING, which is still published in the 5th edition (Amazon and
others). In chapter 16 he shows photos and describes 72 different
patterns of twisted wire suitable for cuff bracelets. So many
ideas… so little time.

Jamie


#3

Giancarlo,

There is a wonderful, older and inexpensive book, with great
twisting wire patterns. The Author’slast name is Maryon, Herbert
Maryon, Metalwork & Enamelling. I paid $8.95 for it from Dover
Publications. It was originally published in 1912, and the fifth
edition was 1971.

Really a wonderful book for anyone.
Hug,
Terrie


#4

There is a book by Herbert Mayron, Metalwork and Enameling that has a
center section that has several pages with many examples of different
twisted wire and how to do it. It is available at this website.

http://kitkraft.biz/product.php?productid=3685&cat=280&page=2

Richard Hart G.G.
Denver, Co.


#5
I am a newbie, well I am a Goldsmith's Apprentice, and I have a
weakness for making bangle bracelets. Does anyone know of
different twisted wire patterns that I can use?? 

Beg, Borrow, Buy, or (well, don’t steal. the first three are
options…) a copy of Herbert Maryon’s classic book, “Metalwork and
Enamelling”. First published in 1912, it’s now easily available as an
inexpensive Dover reprint. Amazon shows it at 13 dollars, I think…
This is one of those books that EVERY jeweler should have on the
shelf somewhere. And for you, it’s got a whole section on twist wire
patterns. You’ll be busy for a while…

Peter Rowe


#6

Giancarlo, take a look at the old but classic work by Herbert
Maryon, Metalwork and Enamelling. On pp. 135-139 (of the Fifth
Revised Edition), there are descriptions and six pages of photos of
different twisted wire patterns.

Enjoy!
Judy Bjorkman


#7

Cool!! Thanks guys. I’ll get cracking on getting this book pronto.

Now as for my sanity… any tips on ID Bands? This thing is making
me go grey.

Masha Danki folks!


#8

Herbert Maryon in his book “Metalwork And Enamelling” has the
largest number of twisted wire designs I’ve seen along with
descriptions of each.

Mike DeBurgh, GJG
Henderson, NV


#9

“Herbert Maryon (1864-1975) wrote a wonderful book, METALWORK AND
ENAMELING…”

So many people raved about this book I went to Alibris and purchased
it for only $4.95 plus found a couple more books I’ve wanted at a
good price and used a money off coupon from Deals Plus/Alibris to
save a little more.

Thanks for the suggestion, can’t wait to get the book!
Pam
Newburyport


#10
any tips on ID Bands? 

Sure, if you tell us what you mean by ID Band…

I’ll expand a bit on Maryon’s book, too. It’s a little book with
much to learn on each and every page - it should be in everybody’s
library, twisted wires or not. My copy is at home, so I can’t refer
to it here and now, but somebody said 72 twisted wires… It’s about
4 pages of photographs of actual twisted wires - “right twisted
square, with a left twisted square twisted together with a small
round…” To that effect, anyway… The book is essential for that
reason alone, but it has much more than that, too.


#11

Giancarlo -

Here in the US we normally have ID bracelets, not bands. So, ours
have a thick metal ‘slab’ connected by links to a clasp. The slab has
a name, medical insignia sometimes (special medical needs: diabetic,
blood type, etc), maybe a date engraved on the obverse. I have not
seen one that is a ‘cuff’ or solid, non-linked type…except for the
Vietnam War POW cuffs that were engraved with the names of those
missing and not accounted for.

What aspect of the ID band/bracelet is causing you problems?

best regards,
Kelley Dragon


#12

Hi Kelly,

ID Band / ID Bracelet, down here it is more commonly called an ID
Band for some reason ro another.

Making the Gourmet Chain [Curb Link] was easy enough, but my main
problem is the soldering of the links to the plaque itself. Should I
cut the end links in half and solder them onto the ends of the
plaque [which is equal in gauge and width] or Is ther another
alternative to doing this?

Also too, I have seen that Goldsmiths usually make a superior box
lock to clasp the ends together. But I have also briefly seen a clasp
where one link locks into another link and there is a hinge and a
clasp. Do you know the name for this one?

Thanks,
Giancarlo.


#13

Giancarlo -

you wrote: But I have also briefly seen a clasp where one link locks
into another link and there is a hinge and a clasp. Do you know the
name for this one?

KD: I’m not sure I have the same idea as you, but there’s a clasp
called a ‘sister clasp’ or ‘sister hook’ that has identical elements
connected by a tube hinge that is very secure and easy to use. Is
that what you are interested in?

http://www.ottofrei.com/store/product.php?productid=15576

Or something else?..
Kelley Dragon


#14
but my main problem is the soldering of the links to the plaque
itself. Should I cut the end links in half and solder them onto the
ends of the plaque [which is equal in gauge and width] or Is ther
another alternative to doing this? 

My own medical ID bracelet has a semi-circular hole in each end,
which is part of its design. Through each hole is quite a thick,
oval, soldered jump ring. Each jump ring is then linked to the curb
chain. The two halves of curb chain are closed with a lobster clasp.
See the following link:

http://westons.com/acatalog/Online-Catalogue-HOO-B01.html

This shows the stainless steel version. I have the sterling silver
version where the design is a little more complex, but it’s still the
same design as the one in the link, with regard to construction.

I don’t know if that helps, but it shows another option.

Helen
UK


#15

If anyone is interested in getting a medical ID, I’d be happy to
work with you. Although trained as a bench jeweler, I’m now working
for American Medical ID (Universal Medical ID in Canada, the UK and
Australia.) We can also set you up with a wholesale account if you
think it’s something you’d be interested in carrying in your store.
Not trying to push sales, just want to let people know the resource
is out there. The website is identifyyourself.com or you can contact
me directly off line or by phone: 713-600-6720. Thanks for all the
invaluable bench insight!

Warmest Regards,
Holly Sabia


#16

Hello Everyone!

Ok, I go my copy of Herbert Maryon’s book today and it is FANTASTIC!
Thank you all very much for pointing me toward this book.

His works are truly masterpieces.

Do you guys know of other good books like these to add to my
library?

Kindest Regards,
Giancarlo.