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How to make liner for stone ring?


#1

Hi, all-

A customer brought me a stone ring, the kind you usually see selling
for $5 and made out of hematite. Hers, though, was her grandmothers,
who recently passed away. She states the stone is black jade,
although the luster seems wrong for this, almost like plastic. I
touched the inside of the ring with a hot pin, and there was no
smoke, smell or deformation, so I can rule out jet or plastic.

There is a crack which runs all the way through the ring on one
side.

My customer wants me to fashion some sort of a protective liner for
this ring in gold. I would like also to have some bit of gold over
the fracture, so that the fracture does not show.

How can I best go about doing this?

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#2
    A customer brought me a stone ring, My customer wants me to
fashion some sort of a protective liner for this ring in gold. I
would like also to have some bit of gold over the fracture, so that
the fracture does not show. 

Hi lee, this is a bit late, but I wondered if you had thought of
making a setting like is used for a " spinner" ring. there were a
lot of posts on this idea last year - basically an open U shaped
ring that you could place the stone band in then push up the last
side of the U -hope this makes sense, Christine


#3
   Hi lee, this is a bit late, but I wondered if you had thought
of making a setting like is used for a " spinner" ring. there were
a lot of posts on this idea last year - basically an open U shaped
ring that you could place the stone band in then push up the last
side of the U 

Thanks, Christine-

One acquaintance suggested that I fashion an inner sleeve, along
with two rings of gold wire, one for each side of the stone ring,
that I epoxy the stone ring and both wire rings in place on the
liner, and burnish the sleeve up on both edges to retain the wires
and the stone ring. I am not over enamored of the epoxy, but may try
soldering one wire on the sleeve, adding the stone ring and the
second wire, and burnishing a lip up to hold the ring and second
wire in place. Some variant of this is probably the best way to go.

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#4

Lee;

When I make rings with a receiving area around the entire
circumference, the best way is to make a flat band, then use two
square pieces of wire, measure and hard solder so you have two bands
that fit around the flat band. Then solder, drill holes and add
prongs if not channel set. Don’t over engineer your work, it just
adds more ‘‘work’.’’

<edit - Message combined>

OPPS LEE:

I guess i didn’t understand at first, The best way to approach your
problem is to use pure silver on the inside band that you have done
as i instructed. cut an inner bevel on one side of the sterling
square band and make the square have a 5 thousands inset cut some
vertical groves in the inner edge and hammer the square in with the
flat band being hammered into the inset and grooves hammer flat
file square and give it a dose of tec solder to hold it from
spinning and fill any spaces. TEC solder will melt with little more
than match heat just don’t overheat!..

Ringman


#5
    but may try soldering one wire on the sleeve, adding the stone
ring and the second wire, and burnishing a lip up to hold the ring
and second wire in place. Some variant of this is probably the best
way to go 

hey Lee, just had another thought - how about lots of smaller U
shapes, like very wide jump rings that are only three quarters of a
circle that you could slip onto the stone ring and then squeeze into
place. This would give a totally different look I know, but it might
make your life easier if the customer agrees, have fun,

Christine