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How to Eliminate Water Spots?


#1

After polishing our silver we clean in a ultrasonic unit and then
rinse our jewelry. We blow off excess water with an air hose and
finally use a hotair drying tank to complete the process. Is there
anything that can be done to eliminate spotting. This is done on a
large scale with our tanks being around 25 gallon size.


#2

No promises, naturally, but do an experiment with adding a touch of
20 Mule Team Borax (available at many grocery stores) to your rinse
water. I add this borax to my dishwasher and my glasses are spotless
regardless of which dishwasher soap I use. When I added a bit of
borax to a basin in which I was hand-washing some glasses, I found it
nearly impossible to hold onto them because they were so slippery!

Barbara


#3

Watch makers dip their parts in denatured alcohol after washing.
Perhaps that would work.


#4

Hi Dennis,

When I clean my vintage crystal beads in my ultrasonic, I give them
an additional dip in a mix of cool water and a little Jet Dry
(spot-free rinse liquid for dishwashers).

I don’t know if it would work for silver, but it sure works on glass
beads. For best results, I put them (strung on fishing line) on a
rack to air dry.

Tracy


#5

Tracy,

When I clean my vintage crystal beads in my ultrasonic, I give them
an additional dip in a mix of cool water and a little Jet Dry 

Be careful here. The MSDS sheet on this stuff says it is quite nasty
as it contains ‘Sulfamic and Citric acid’.

MSDS:

  Danger. Corrosive. 

  Contains Sulfamic and Citric acid. Causes burns to eyes. Skin
  irritant. Harmful if swallowed. Avoid contact with eyes and
  skin. Avoid breathing dust or mist from this product. Wear eye
  protection and rubber gloves when handling. Do not take
  internally. Remove and wash any contaminated clothing and
  clean shoes before reuse. Store in original container in a
  secure, dry area, inaccessible to children and pets. Keep out
  of reach of children. 

The thing is, its probably safe used in a dishwasher where it is
totally enclosed but taken out of its intended environment it may be
a hazard.

Ian
Ian W. Wright
Sheffield UK


#6
a little Jet Dry Be careful here. The MSDS sheet on this stuff says
it is quite nasty as it contains 'Sulfamic and Citric acid'. [snip
MSDS] The thing is, its probably safe used in a dishwasher where it
is totally enclosed but taken out of its intended environment it
may be a hazard. 

Agreed, Ian.

And even in its intended environment it’s a dangerous liquid. Any
drops on the shelf under the sink where we keep our dishwasher
’finish’ product have eaten away the paint. The small print in our
dishwasher warrantee excludes damage from the product.

Brian

Brian Adam
Auckland NEW ZEALAND
www.adam.co.nz


#7

After polishing and cleaning in the ultrasonic the object should be
sommersed in an alcohol bath and then thrown into a container of wood
chips (shavings, grains, dust). Agitate the container so that the
object is totally impregnated and covered. Generally in half an hour
the object will be dry and spot free.

Lois


#8

Hi Ian,

Ack! Well, if I run the stuff in my dishwasher and then drink out of
the glasses after they dry, then just what the heck am I exposing
myself to? I guess instead of wearing a mask while I’m soldering, I
should pay attention to my own kitchen, first ;-D

I’ll have to go back and read the label next time I pick up a
bottle. I just use a little squirt in a bowl of water to dip the
beads in. It does, however, work like a charm.

Thanks for the heads up,
Tracy


#9

Hi Ian,

Is it possible that in the UK there is a different material sold as
Jet Dry? I went to several MSDS databases and all of them list Jet
Dry as non hazardous:

http://www2.itap.purdue.edu/msds/docs/1672.pdf
http://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id01003
http://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id=18001132

Jim

James Binnion
@James_Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


360-756-6550


#10
Is it possible that in the UK there is a different material sold as
Jet Dry? I went to several MSDS databases and all of them list Jet
Dry as non hazardous 

James, I found that the manufacturer’s MSDS sheets were indeed
generally as you stated, but a wider search found that the active
ingredients were 60% citric acid and 40% sulphamic acid (sulfamic in
the States) approximately.

Sulphamic acid is an interesting compound (Wilkipedia does a good
article on it) but for metal-smithing purposes can be regarded as a
strong acid - stronger than citric or phosphoric acid, but not as
strong as the three main mineral acids (hydrochloric, nitric,
sulphuric). The toxicity appears to put it somewhere in the same
class as these latter three acids.

I use it as a tarnish remover for metals, 5% in water with 5%
thiourea added. This is a similar formulation to various ‘Silver
Dip’ agents.

Paul Jelley
London


#11

Paul,

What is your reference to the formula for Jet Dry? I did a pH test
on the bottle in my kitchen cabinet and it is ideed quite acidic
(2.1). I am always a little leery of Wikipedia as a source as I have
found some bogus there but I did some other reading on
sulphamic acid and it is indeed a close, slightly weaker relative of
sulphuric acid Did your reference list a percentage by volume? I
assume that the numbers you give are active ingredient percentages
not absolute percentages as 60 percent citric acid would be darn
near a paste. The citric acid content would not worry me as it is a
common food ingredient. The sulphamic is of a little more of concern
but it all depends on concentration. Acetic acid will burn you
severely in its glacial form but most folks like it on their salad in
a more dilute concentration. So the concern is what is the
concentration. The original poster said she diluted it for use so I
might want to refrain from putting my hands in it I would not
necessarily stop using it and I certainly will treat it with more
respect when I pour it into the dishwasher :slight_smile: Thanks

Jim

James Binnion
@James_Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


360-756-6550


#12

When I wrote with my initial caution note I didn’t anticipate that I
would be poking a hornets nest ;-)…

Whilst the fact that Jet Dry appears to be a mixture of acids is a
concern, the more important point is that, when it is used in a
manner other than that for which it is intended, other factors come
into play. In the dishwasher, the substance is fully enclosed and,
before the door is opened, has been flushed away. When it is used on
the bench there is a distinct possibility of spray and mist from the
substance, particularly if it is used in something like an ultrasonic
bath and so one must be wary of inhaling the mist or of where any
spray or splashes might fall and dry, condensing into much stronger
acidic droplets.

Ian W. Wright
Sheffield UK


#13

James,

What is your reference to the formula for Jet Dry? 

This link is for “Jet Dry Dishwasher Cleaner Powder” manufactured by
Reckitt Benckiser, Inc.;

http://tinyurl.com/yb9sh6

Did your reference list a percentage by volume? I assume that the
numbers you give are active ingredient percentages 

It did not say; I assume by weight since the analysis is for the
product presented as a dry powder. No ingredients other than citric
and sulfamic acids are listed, at 60% and 40% respectively.

However the same manufacturer also lists the following liquid Jet
Dry formulations;

-Jet Dry Sparkle Liquid Rinsing Agent no hazardous ingredients
-Jet Dry Rinse Agent with Baking Soda Liquid unspecified surfactants
-Jet-Dry with Shine Boost 8.45 Fl. Oz. unspecified surfactants

Paul Jelley
London